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Hazy Day


Alan7140

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Hazy scene yesterday on Woodspring Rd, Central Highlands, Tasmania.

 

yoWkPft.jpg

 

Thornton-Pickard half plate, Rodenstock Apo-Rodagon (1935), 6 sec @ f/45, Ilford Multigrade IV paper neg.

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Alan, I _really_ like this photograph! The composition is perfect in my eyes. And the tonal gradations - sigh...

Congrats!!!

 

Markus (a little bit jealous ;-))

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Thanks, Marcus. 

 

I was following my tried and trusted method of "finding" a photograph - I always make an effort to travel any road I recently travelled a second time, but in the opposite direction.

On my first trip a few weeks ago I returned home without taking a single photo, but yesterday, travelling the opposite way, this vista presented itself just 6km from the end of the journey down that road.

The scene itself was probably just an ordinary rural scene under normal circumstances, but the light was simply prefect and made things glow, rendering nicely in a monochrome photograph shot through an 85-year-old lens onto UV-blue-green sensitive emulsion to accentuate the haze, and therefore depth.

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Hi Alan,

that´s a good practice, retravelling in the opposite direction! I like revisiting known places but I did not yet explicitely try to approach them from a new direction. I´ll keep that in mind...

 

Maybe I have a soft spot for "ordinary" rural scenes, but I think it takes considerable skill to arrange the composition in the way you did it. The depth and balance are extraordinary. Of course your mastery of that special equipment you used may have helped, too...

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10 hours ago, Markus said:

Hi Alan,

that´s a good practice, retravelling in the opposite direction! I like revisiting known places but I did not yet explicitely try to approach them from a new direction. I´ll keep that in mind...

 

Maybe I have a soft spot for "ordinary" rural scenes, but I think it takes considerable skill to arrange the composition in the way you did it. The depth and balance are extraordinary. Of course your mastery of that special equipment you used may have helped, too...

 

Part of the attraction to me in returning to film and antique equipment has been the familiarity of seeing and composing photographs before even unpacking the camera, instead of machine-gunning everything in sight and then sifting through hundreds or thousands of digital files on a monitor looking for the "good" ones.

 

The cost of materials makes taking the photographs this way a deliberate, considered action, particularly with an old view camera where the image is displayed upside-down and reversed, making it easier to compose with the eye rather than through a viewfinder, and only taking the photograph when everything is as good as it can be.

 

This exposure was one of only two variations I took over about 30 minutes, some of which was standing around waiting for the light to be even rather than broken up by shadows from the few clouds moving overhead. I used just four sheets of paper neg, although one was lost when a darkslide failed to close properly (a hazard of using century-old equipment), and one where I noticed the camera shudder when a gust of wind hit it during the exposure. So just two exposures, one included the road in the foreground, the second was this one which I preferred for its keeping the tree as the main point of interest rather than having an added foreground distraction of the road, which then becomes secondary as, along with the fence, it helps guide the eye into the scene as it appears intermittently in the middle distance.

 

I think it's pretty easy to see that even though I'm working with very different landscapes, my influences stem from the 18th-19th Century English School of Landscape Artists (Constable, Turner etc) rather than any landscape photographers.

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Yes, the influences clearly show!

I love Turner, too. And I agree that thinking in advance helps - but since working digital I found out that for me that using the first exposures as a scetch helps me to get nearer to a better framing, if that makes sense? But I try on the other side to previsualize more, like in the old slide days 😅.

Very interesting to hear the story behind your shot! I like the way you work, real craftsmanship. 👍👍👍

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