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Found 25 results

  1. As I have mentioned in numerous previous posts over the years, the Ultimate Big 5 Safari has proven to be the very best introduction to African wildlife for photographers that you can get. Our most recent edition (the 6th one) underlined this with some amazing photo opportunities presenting themselves for our guests. The fact that our 2017 edition is already 50% sold before we even left for the 2016 edition simply reinforces this. It’s one heck of a photo safari. Everybody loves it. The 2016 Edition was our largest in terms of number so far. We hosted 10 guests, of which 5 were repeat visitors, who brought with them 2 family members who were on safari for the first time, plus we had another family of 3 first timers who have already begun making arrangements for a follow up safari in 2018 with us. The thing that makes our UB5 safari so unique is that unlike our competitors who focus on selling their guests “education” in the form of workshops, we focus on providing a social experience that you don’t get with other safari planners who do the workshop thing. Our trips are about fun and making sure you are in the best positions for great photos. People who join this trip end up becoming our friends and they then go on to explore other parts of Southern Africa with us later. This year our UB5 safari was much the same as previous editions but for the first time we used three vehicles instead of the usual two. This made a big difference to the seating arrangements because we were able to spread out a lot more. The third vehicle we used was a specialised photographic safari Land Rover that has two swivel seats as well as two elevated seats in the rear, all with an arm in front of them onto which you can mount your big rigs, such as the popular 200-400mm lenses, or even 600mm f/4 lenses (one of which made its first appearance on this year’s outing). Also, unlike previous years where the two vehicles would generally stay together on drives, this year we all split up when we left camp and would only meet up on some sightings, but always for our morning coffee stops or evening sundowners. This slight change in the group dynamic meant that we all had different photos to compare later, which was great. OK, so how did this year’s sightings compare with previous years? Well, it was definitely up there, that’s for sure. It’s never easy to compare safaris because each time we have been to Sabi Sabi we have experienced different things that have made the trips there so special. We’ve had cheetah chases, leopard kills, lion hunts, wild dog hunts and even newborn rhinos, but this year for the first time we got lion cubs that were only 6 weeks old. Seeing as lions are my favourite animals this was for me the ultimate sighting. I could have spent days watching these playful little cats and not bothered about any other sightings. They were amazing to watch and photograph. On one of the cub sightings we had there was a really comical moment that I managed to get on video. You gotta check this out. Apart from the incredible sightings we also enjoyed a significant upgrade to Little Bush Camp. The returning guests were all very impressed with the changes to the suites. The changes to the lounge and dining areas were also very nice. However, while we were on this safari we stopped off at Selati Lodge for a bathroom break and I became quite enamoured with that camp. Prior to this trip it was the only one of the 4 Sabi Sabi Lodges I hadn’t seen inside. I like the layout of the camp and also there is a huge watering hole right in front of the lodge, so you can sometimes skip a game drive entirely and just watch the watering hole at sunset as animals come to indulge in sundowners of their own. It’s definitely on my radar as a possible host for UB5 in the future. Speaking of future UB5 safaris, the 2017 edition is set to happen between 27 August and 3 September. As mentioned we are already half full for that trip, so if you are thinking about joining us please get in touch ASAP. We have space for 5 more people to join. We will also be offering extensions to UB5 2017 and will send out a newsletter from Photographers.travel once we have details for you on that one. If you aren't on that mailing list please head over to the site and click on the sign-up button at the bottom of each page. In the meantime please enjoy some of the photos I took on the most recent safari. My equipment was really simple this year. I had two Olympus E-M1 bodies, the Olympus 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO and the Olympus 50-200mm f/2.8-3.5 SWD. There were also a few other lenses, such as the 75/1.8 and my 7.5mm fisheye, but they didn’t get out much this time around. I would have liked to try out the new Olympus 300mm f/4.0 PRO on this trip but a loan copy wasn’t available. Maybe next time.
  2. As I have mentioned in numerous previous posts over the years, the Ultimate Big 5 Safari has proven to be the very best introduction to African wildlife for photographers that you can get. Our most recent edition (the 6th one) underlined this with some amazing photo opportunities presenting themselves for our guests. The fact that our 2017 edition is already 50% sold before we even left for the 2016 edition simply reinforces this. It’s one heck of a photo safari. Everybody loves it. The 2016 Edition was our largest in terms of number so far. We hosted 10 guests, of which 5 were repeat visitors, who brought with them 2 family members who were on safari for the first time, plus we had another family of 3 first timers who have already begun making arrangements for a follow up safari in 2018 with us. The thing that makes our UB5 safari so unique is that unlike our competitors who focus on selling their guests “education” in the form of workshops, we focus on providing a social experience that you don’t get with other safari planners who do the workshop thing. Our trips are about fun and making sure you are in the best positions for great photos. People who join this trip end up becoming our friends and they then go on to explore other parts of Southern Africa with us later. This year our UB5 safari was much the same as previous editions but for the first time we used three vehicles instead of the usual two. This made a big difference to the seating arrangements because we were able to spread out a lot more. The third vehicle we used was a specialised photographic safari Land Rover that has two swivel seats as well as two elevated seats in the rear, all with an arm in front of them onto which you can mount your big rigs, such as the popular 200-400mm lenses, or even 600mm f/4 lenses (one of which made its first appearance on this year’s outing). Also, unlike previous years where the two vehicles would generally stay together on drives, this year we all split up when we left camp and would only meet up on some sightings, but always for our morning coffee stops or evening sundowners. This slight change in the group dynamic meant that we all had different photos to compare later, which was great. OK, so how did this year’s sightings compare with previous years? Well, it was definitely up there, that’s for sure. It’s never easy to compare safaris because each time we have been to Sabi Sabi we have experienced different things that have made the trips there so special. We’ve had cheetah chases, leopard kills, lion hunts, wild dog hunts and even newborn rhinos, but this year for the first time we got lion cubs that were only 6 weeks old. Seeing as lions are my favourite animals this was for me the ultimate sighting. I could have spent days watching these playful little cats and not bothered about any other sightings. They were amazing to watch and photograph. On one of the cub sightings we had there was a really comical moment that I managed to get on video. You gotta check this out. Apart from the incredible sightings we also enjoyed a significant upgrade to Little Bush Camp. The returning guests were all very impressed with the changes to the suites. The changes to the lounge and dining areas were also very nice. However, while we were on this safari we stopped off at Selati Lodge for a bathroom break and I became quite enamoured with that camp. Prior to this trip it was the only one of the 4 Sabi Sabi Lodges I hadn’t seen inside. I like the layout of the camp and also there is a huge watering hole right in front of the lodge, so you can sometimes skip a game drive entirely and just watch the watering hole at sunset as animals come to indulge in sundowners of their own. It’s definitely on my radar as a possible host for UB5 in the future. Speaking of future UB5 safaris, the 2017 edition is set to happen between 27 August and 3 September. As mentioned we are already half full for that trip, so if you are thinking about joining us please get in touch ASAP. We have space for 5 more people to join. We will also be offering extensions to UB5 2017 and will send out a newsletter from Photographers.travel once we have details for you on that one. If you aren't on that mailing list please head over to the site and click on the sign-up button at the bottom of each page. In the meantime please enjoy some of the photos I took on the most recent safari. My equipment was really simple this year. I had two Olympus E-M1 bodies, the Olympus 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO and the Olympus 50-200mm f/2.8-3.5 SWD. There were also a few other lenses, such as the 75/1.8 and my 7.5mm fisheye, but they didn’t get out much this time around. I would have liked to try out the new Olympus 300mm f/4.0 PRO on this trip but a loan copy wasn’t available. Maybe next time. View full article
  3. We arrived yesterday and are having a total blast here at the revitalised Little Bush Camp in Sabi Sabi. On our first drive we came across the huge male leopard Maxabeni who was lying in the shade of some palm trees. He's a very chilled out cat and we got really close to him to make some great shots. He's got damage on his nose from a fight he had with another leopard a few weeks ago. I'll update this thread with more shots as we go and hopefully some of the other Safarians will also chip in with some of their contributions @Chris Wahl @Greg Drawbaugh @Ann @fredazinger @Pepe Jones
  4. Franscois does a masterful job of placing the new for 2016 Photo Rig Land Rover into position for a leopard sighting. Fred, Ann and Chris were "armed" and ready for the action to start.
  5. Dallas

    Vultures

    White-backed vultures scoping the horizon at Sabi Sabi.
  6. Dallas

    (not) Maxebeni

    Maxebeni is the dominant male leopard at Sabi Sabi. He took over from the 1-eyed Sandriver male a couple of years ago and has proven to be quite a formidable cat. You can see a fresh battle wound on his left shoulder.
  7. Usually I am quite relaxed in the bush and I even have some stupid trust in the various cats but when Elephants and Rhinos are present I am rather attentive and prefer a little safety distance ... The mere mass of these animals is a clear indication that there aren't a lot of options when they get angry ... Knowing how fast they are doesn't help at all ... What actually helps with Rhinos is to know that they have very poor eyesight and if you are a few metres away from them they certainly don't see you any more. This allows for getting out of the car (not on the side of the Rhino of course) and shoot from underneath the car to get eye level with the Rhino ... they don't see it and the smell doesn't change so they don't bother ... but don't even think about doing this with Elephants! Hope you like them Chris #1 This is one of the "under the car" shots ... #2 and another one with a slightly different angle ... #3 oh those happy loving couples make it look so easy, happy loving couples always talk so kind. 'Til the time that I can do my dancing with a partner ... those happy couples ain't no friends of mine ... *scnr* #4 and a final one "600 style" ... I'd love to have some more space on the right side but well ...
  8. From the album: 2016 Sabi Sabi

    © Dallas Dahms

  9. Although we spent a lot of time in the Terrapin Hide at Madikwe we also did a couple of game drives and during one of them we had really nice light. We were lucky enough to meet two cheetahs (brothers) who hang around together after a meal they had somewhere else ... at least this is what i assume if I look at the reddish appearance of his fur ... Well it is a rather safe assumption ... With both images I am yet undecided whether I give them a tight "portrait crop" or whether I go with the version that leave them more space to "breathe" ... I posted both versions of each and all comments, opinions and proposals are highly appreciated! Hope you like them Chris #1 Tight crop #2 This is the full frame ... #3 the tighter crop ... I cropped even more on the right side but didn't like the result ... this might however change tomorrow ... #4 90% of the frame, most of it got lost due to tilt correction
  10. All below images were taken at Sabi Sabi where the drought really pushed the buffalos (and most of the other herbivores) to their limit. I hope I am not over the top with the processing, if yes please let me know ... and I am also looking forward to your opinions regarding what works better for you ... colour or b/w Here is the post with b/w versions of below images ... Cheers Chris #1 Another version of this shot was already posted in another thread but I like this one slightly better and it is of course post-processed now. This guy actually "climbed" on a termite mound in search for food. He wasn't very successful as you can see ... #2 Seeing a Buffalo standing up is quite impressing ... and I like the oxpeckers #3 Being on a safari with a 600mm is sometimes challenging and requires a different approach ... Sometimes we were too close to the action so the 70-200 was first choice but sometimes I forced myself to stick with the 600 and see things in a different way. I learned a lot!
  11. Chris Wahl

    Buffalo - B/W

    All below images were taken at Sabi Sabi where the drought really pushed the buffalos (and most of the other herbivores) to their limit. I hope I am not over the top with the processing, if yes please let me know ... and I am also looking forward to your opinions regarding what works better for you ... colour or b/w Here is the post with the colour versions of below images ... Cheers Chris #1 Another version of this shot was already posted in another thread but I like this one slightly better and it is of course post-processed now. This guy actually "climbed" on a termite mound in search for food. He wasn't very successful as you can see ... The b/w version also has a slightly tighter crop. #2 Seeing a Buffalo standing up is quite impressing ... and I like the oxpeckers, which in b/w loose some of their "impact". #3 Being on a safari with a 600mm is sometimes challenging and requires a different approach ... Sometimes we were too close to the action so the 70-200 was first choice but sometimes I forced myself to stick with the 600 and see things in a different way. I learned a lot! that last one might be a bit too dark on the sRGB jpg ... it is just right on screen in ProPhoto and the printer softproof ...
  12. Here are a few of Mi-Anne's shots (and a couple of mine) from our UB5/Madikwe trip. 1 - Golden Tailed Woodpecker: 2 - Lilac Breasted Roller: 3 - Fluffy Roller: 4 - Bataleur: 5 - Little Blue Waxbill: 6 - Little Bee Eater: 7 - Swallow Tail Bee Eater: 8 - Juvenile Owl: 9 - Lord and Lady D.: 10 - Red Headed Weaver: 11 - Blue Eared Starling? (Greg can you confirm this identification?): 12 - Crimson Breasted Shrike:
  13. Dallas

    The Azingers

    Fred, Mi-Anne & Morgan.
  14. Here are some images of the not so spectacular birds that live in the bush. The only exception is probably #4 (see below). These aren't the most brilliant images but these birds often where around when there was not much else to photograph so I felt that it is only fair to present them I am not really sure whether I got all the names right so please correct me if I did it wrong ... Cheers Chris #1 The Grebe of the Madikwe waterhole ... whenever we waited for mammals or the kingfisher couple it got our attention #2 The southern yellow-billed hornbill ... a very common sight. This particular guy is sort of tame and always waits for Safarians at one of the sundowner places at Sabi Sabi ... #3 A starling which waits together with above hornbill at the sundowner place. Always ready for a fight to get some of the goodies from the Safarians ... #4 A ground hornbill at Sabi Sabi ... this is actually a very endangered species since the breeding process is particularly protracted. Generally flocks (typically 4-5 birds) produce a chick once every 6 years. The chick is fed by the members of the flock for 2 years. Contrary to my introduction in this post, this bird is indeed spectacular and not a very common sight. #5 The next candidate is a green-backed heron ... at least I think so ... he was one of the birds that made our hours in the Terrapin hide. #6 Well ... we also had vultures ... important birds they are but no matter how important they are they remain ugly ... Whether the processing is to everybodies liking remains to be seen ...
  15. Chris Wahl

    Cape Weaver

    Like two yeary ago I started the whole Safari business with some cape weaver stalking at Tladi Lodge in Johanesburg. I really like these birds and considering that the males build their nests just to have them destroyed again by the females is sort of ... well ... Actually the following images (with one exception) are taken in the morning before we left for a visit to a small reserve not far from the lodge. When we came back in the afternoon, the nest was history and the boy was already busy building a new one on a different twig. When we came back to Tladi Lodge one week later he was still bulding a nest ... but again ... different place ... consider this Here are my best images from the series (at least the ones I like most). Cheers Chris #1 This is my favourite image of the lot. It took me quite a while to figure out where to prefocus and to identify a pattern in the behaviour of the weavers. Not that there is much of a pattern ... #2 The snowball approach ... this is the comical component of the series ... #3 I do admire the persistence of the weavers ... that whole nest building over and over again ... wow ... #4 and finally an image where the weaver inspects the outcome of his efforts ... He seemed to like it but well ... Lady W. didn't #5 the final image is the one taken a day earlier in the afternoon --- I like the colours and the way the background somewhat frames the bird
  16. Sounds like a rock group. John, Greg, Kay & Bill.
  17. Dallas

    The Taste Test

    Not sure if it was the coffee or the rusks, but something didn't quite pass go here.
  18. Dallas

    Trees Of Africa

    Here are some images of trees I photographed on our most recent safari. There was a storm threatening during one of our drives. It looked very ominous and we heard lots of thunder, but alas the rains didn't come as expected. Not sure what kind of tree this is but it was huge. Look what's standing underneath its lowest branches. Here's a shot I am really happy with. Shot on the evening of "elephant dung smoking" (a topic I will leave open for the Safarians to post photos of!) this shows how barren things have become in some parts of the reserve.
  19. Early on in the safari we came across a white rhino with a youngster (actually we saw several of these). Our ranger suggested that we might be able to get a good low angle shot of the baby if we got off the vehicle on the opposite side and shot through the undercarriage. This is one of the shots I got that I am quite happy with - the rest saw quite a bit of grass in the way. Shooting with the tilting LCD screen of the Olympus E-M1 in this situation saved me from having to lie down in the grass and risk getting myself bitten by ticks. Also, this advantage of not having to lie down in the dirt to get the shot meant I was able to get back on the vehicle faster if something should have gone wrong.
  20. Dallas

    Standing Ground

    Standing his ground. This image shows the good bokeh of the Olympus 50-200mm f/2.8-3.5 SWD. I would love to get my hands on the Olympus 90-250mm f/2.8 for next year's safari. I think that lens on an E-M1 would rock. Be sure to click for the larger version.
  21. Dallas

    Bateleur

    I now have exactly 2 birds in flight images for my wildlife portfolio. This is a Bateleur eagle.
  22. Dallas

    They got me...

    First they sense me... Then they obliterate me!
  23. Seemingly just as chilled out as Mike's friend Dave.
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