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Found 14 results

  1. Yesterday Adobe announced their new Lightroom CC and Lightroom Classic CC programs. Basically it goes like this: Lightroom CC, which many of us have been using for a few years is now being called Lightroom CC Classic. Lightroom CC is a new cloud based editing program and subscription that gives you 1TB of cloud storage and lets you edit those images across all your devices using their mobile apps and (I think) the desktop app too. It's not the same as Lightroom CC that we have been using since it was first released. Lightroom standalone has now reached its final release. The Lightroom CC Classic falls under the $9.99 a month pricing plan that includes Photoshop and is apparently now a LOT faster than before. I am busy downloading it as I type this, so I will report back on that a little later on. However, if you want the new Lightroom CC you will have to subscribe to a different $9.99 a month package that provides you with 1TB of cloud storage. Or, if you want the new Lightroom CC and the old Lightroom CC Classic you are in for $19.99 per month. Or, if you want to stick with your existing photography plan for $9.99 per month, you will now also get Lightroom CC (the new one) for free and get 20GB of cloud storage (which we already have). Or, if you only want to use the Lightroom Mobile CC you can get it for $4.99 with 100GB of cloud storage. Confused yet? So am I. Why on earth couldn't they just name their products Lightroom Mobile, Lightroom Desktop and Lightroom Cloud?
  2. I bought an iMac over the weekend (couldn't resist the deal). Now I am trying to install my Adobe CC apps onto it and OMG. It's like trying to suck honey through a straw in Siberia in the dead of winter. Just to install the Desktop app required a live intervention by Adobe support who took remote control of my new Mac to download something from a different place to where I was trying to d/l it from. I removed all the Adobe apps from my old Mac Mini manually, as per instruction from them, then I installed Photoshop on the iMac and it worked. Lightroom? No chance. It got to about 28% of the way after 5 hours of downloading before I lost my patience and stopped it. Now the Desktop app tells me that Photoshop is not installed and I can't even sign out from the bloody thing. Seriously, this is absurd that they still can't get this right after over 2 years of the Cloud becoming the only way to get these programs.
  3. I upgraded a few days ago and I have noticed that this program is now even slower to launch than it was before (which was pretty slow). Is this a subtle hint from Adobe that my hardware needs upgrading or is there some kind of magic handshake I need to perform to get it to run faster?
  4. There’s an old saying that you get what you pay for. Usually it means that if you buy cheap, you buy twice because the first thing you buy will let you down and you’ll never get back your money. I’ve experienced this over and over in my life, from clothing to hardware and everything inbetween. But this year I discovered that you can actually get good value for little money - the Adobe Creative Cloud Photography Package. In the past I’ve never been keen to shell out money for software and I will admit to being somewhat peeved when Adobe announced their plan to make the software they sell available only as a rentable service in the form of the Creative Cloud suite. What? How could they do this? I was even more appalled at what they were asking for the CC subscription at $50 per month. To make it even worse the bloody thing wasn’t initially available where I live. I thought they had totally lost their minds. As you will recall the entire photographic industry was up in arms because now we were effectively paying for stuff we didn’t really want, like Illustrator, InDesign, Flash, Dreamweaver, etc. $50 a month in South African terms is pretty expensive. It’s more than half of what I pay for my vehicle each month (yes, I don’t drive a fancy car anymore, as a struggling photographer I have resigned myself to a small Ford pickup who’s only “luxury” feature is power assisted steering - even the windows have manual winders!). After a few months of enduring loud internet photographers jumping around like a legion of men and women with fire ants in their pants, Adobe did something to calm the waters. They introduced the Photography package for the Cloud, which comprises a full version of Bridge, Photoshop and Lightroom. The initial pricing of $29 for new users and $20 for existing Photoshop licensees didn’t go down well at all either. More jumping around ensued until eventually we were offered the Adobe Photography package for the very reasonable price of only $9.99 per month. With this option you get the latest versions of Lightroom, Bridge and the full Photoshop, provided you commit to a year’s subscription. Now even me, who is more tight-arsed than any other when it comes to buying things you can’t physically touch, sat up and took notice. This is actually a very good deal. Here’s why: Low Cost What can you buy for $10 a month? OK, yes, a subscription to Fotozones costs less and is infinitely more enjoyable, but seriously, $10 is nothing. Even I can afford that. In South African terms its about the price of 2.5 regular Big Mac Meals. If you’re a monthly consumer of that rubbish you could rather spend the money on the Adobe Photography package and save your health. In the old days you would spend a considerable amount of money on Photoshop alone. The local price was astronomically high for me which is why I never bought it. I think it was almost as much as a decent laptop computer and definitely more than an excellent desktop PC. And then when the new version came out you’d have to pay an upgrade fee that was not all that cheap either. Let’s put it this way: it cost way more than $120 a year to own Photoshop and that figure is not much more than you would pay for an annual upgrade to Lightroom on its own. You Get The Latest Versions As I mentioned in the point before, with the old perpetual subscription to Photoshop and Lightroom you would get an upgrade maybe once every year or 18 months. And you had to pay for it. With this deal you get the latest version as it becomes available via a download, apparently every 6 months. I’m not big on using Photoshop, I tend to use Lightroom for 99% of my edits purely because it is more suited to convenience than Photoshop is, but if I do need to use it, I have the latest version available to me. Just the other day the Creative Cloud Desktop app installed Photoshop CC 2014 onto both my Apple computers. Yes, you can run two copies of each program, so if you’re like me and you use a desktop as well as a laptop you’re covered. It doesn’t matter what platform either. It Runs Smoothly There’s been a lot said about performance issues of other software and I can relate. Before I joined the wonderful world of mirrorless cameras I used Nikon’s Capture NX2 on occasion to process RAW files. Running to the shop down the road and back was faster than that program when it came to batch converting my RAW files. I could probably also run to the beach, have a swim and get back before it had finished processing about 1000 images. The same thing can be said for other software I have tried, including Olympus’ ridiculously slow Olympus Viewer 2 application, as well as a few others I have tried along the way. Yes, those other programs do work and they can produce excellent results, but unless you have a super computer they can be extremely frustrating to use, especially if you want quick previews of changes you’re making. The Olympus Viewer 2 program never shows you a high quality preview with anything resembling speed, nor do a few others I have tried. If you’re not viewing the best quality preview how can you possibly make a call on what needs editing? The Lightroom and Photoshop HQ previews load instantly on my pretty old Mac Mini (2010) as well as my 13” MacBook Pro (2013). When you make a change to the images you get an excellent preview of what they’re going to look like. I’m just not getting that on any of the other programs I have tried, so the Adobe solution is a good one for me. It’s A Tax Deductible Expense If you’re a professional photographer who is running a business a monthly overhead like this comes off your taxable earnings as a legitimate deduction. It doesn’t appear on your balance sheet as an asset that you have to depreciate over a set number of years (which varies from taxman to taxman depending on how hard they like to screw you), so you get the full tax deduction benefit immediately and there is no huge capital expenditure outlay upfront. This is a very big positive that may not immediately be obvious to many professional photographers. OK, it doesn’t help the photography enthusiasts who can’t deduct it as a legitimate business expense, but hey, it’s $10 a month. Are you really, really going to miss that? I’m very happy that I have the Adobe Creative Cloud Photographers package. I don’t think that there is better value out there for what it provides. Sure, there are some disadvantages for users of exotic sensors like the Fuji X-trans so it’s understandable that there will be a sense of injury should the Adobe engine not be demosaicing your RAW files properly. But for the rest of us this represents a truly wonderful opportunity to get the industry’s gold standard image editing software for what amounts to peanuts. I think it’s great.
  5. There’s an old saying that you get what you pay for. Usually it means that if you buy cheap, you buy twice because the first thing you buy will let you down and you’ll never get back your money. I’ve experienced this over and over in my life, from clothing to hardware and everything inbetween. But this year I discovered that you can actually get good value for little money - the Adobe Creative Cloud Photography Package. In the past I’ve never been keen to shell out money for software and I will admit to being somewhat peeved when Adobe announced their plan to make the software they sell available only as a rentable service in the form of the Creative Cloud suite. What? How could they do this? I was even more appalled at what they were asking for the CC subscription at $50 per month. To make it even worse the bloody thing wasn’t initially available where I live. I thought they had totally lost their minds. As you will recall the entire photographic industry was up in arms because now we were effectively paying for stuff we didn’t really want, like Illustrator, InDesign, Flash, Dreamweaver, etc. $50 a month in South African terms is pretty expensive. It’s more than half of what I pay for my vehicle each month (yes, I don’t drive a fancy car anymore, as a struggling photographer I have resigned myself to a small Ford pickup who’s only “luxury” feature is power assisted steering - even the windows have manual winders!). After a few months of enduring loud internet photographers jumping around like a legion of men and women with fire ants in their pants, Adobe did something to calm the waters. They introduced the Photography package for the Cloud, which comprises a full version of Bridge, Photoshop and Lightroom. The initial pricing of $29 for new users and $20 for existing Photoshop licensees didn’t go down well at all either. More jumping around ensued until eventually we were offered the Adobe Photography package for the very reasonable price of only $9.99 per month. With this option you get the latest versions of Lightroom, Bridge and the full Photoshop, provided you commit to a year’s subscription. Now even me, who is more tight-arsed than any other when it comes to buying things you can’t physically touch, sat up and took notice. This is actually a very good deal. Here’s why: Low Cost What can you buy for $10 a month? OK, yes, a subscription to Fotozones costs less and is infinitely more enjoyable, but seriously, $10 is nothing. Even I can afford that. In South African terms its about the price of 2.5 regular Big Mac Meals. If you’re a monthly consumer of that rubbish you could rather spend the money on the Adobe Photography package and save your health. In the old days you would spend a considerable amount of money on Photoshop alone. The local price was astronomically high for me which is why I never bought it. I think it was almost as much as a decent laptop computer and definitely more than an excellent desktop PC. And then when the new version came out you’d have to pay an upgrade fee that was not all that cheap either. Let’s put it this way: it cost way more than $120 a year to own Photoshop and that figure is not much more than you would pay for an annual upgrade to Lightroom on its own. You Get The Latest Versions As I mentioned in the point before, with the old perpetual subscription to Photoshop and Lightroom you would get an upgrade maybe once every year or 18 months. And you had to pay for it. With this deal you get the latest version as it becomes available via a download, apparently every 6 months. I’m not big on using Photoshop, I tend to use Lightroom for 99% of my edits purely because it is more suited to convenience than Photoshop is, but if I do need to use it, I have the latest version available to me. Just the other day the Creative Cloud Desktop app installed Photoshop CC 2014 onto both my Apple computers. Yes, you can run two copies of each program, so if you’re like me and you use a desktop as well as a laptop you’re covered. It doesn’t matter what platform either. It Runs Smoothly There’s been a lot said about performance issues of other software and I can relate. Before I joined the wonderful world of mirrorless cameras I used Nikon’s Capture NX2 on occasion to process RAW files. Running to the shop down the road and back was faster than that program when it came to batch converting my RAW files. I could probably also run to the beach, have a swim and get back before it had finished processing about 1000 images. The same thing can be said for other software I have tried, including Olympus’ ridiculously slow Olympus Viewer 2 application, as well as a few others I have tried along the way. Yes, those other programs do work and they can produce excellent results, but unless you have a super computer they can be extremely frustrating to use, especially if you want quick previews of changes you’re making. The Olympus Viewer 2 program never shows you a high quality preview with anything resembling speed, nor do a few others I have tried. If you’re not viewing the best quality preview how can you possibly make a call on what needs editing? The Lightroom and Photoshop HQ previews load instantly on my pretty old Mac Mini (2010) as well as my 13” MacBook Pro (2013). When you make a change to the images you get an excellent preview of what they’re going to look like. I’m just not getting that on any of the other programs I have tried, so the Adobe solution is a good one for me. It’s A Tax Deductible Expense If you’re a professional photographer who is running a business a monthly overhead like this comes off your taxable earnings as a legitimate deduction. It doesn’t appear on your balance sheet as an asset that you have to depreciate over a set number of years (which varies from taxman to taxman depending on how hard they like to screw you), so you get the full tax deduction benefit immediately and there is no huge capital expenditure outlay upfront. This is a very big positive that may not immediately be obvious to many professional photographers. OK, it doesn’t help the photography enthusiasts who can’t deduct it as a legitimate business expense, but hey, it’s $10 a month. Are you really, really going to miss that? I’m very happy that I have the Adobe Creative Cloud Photographers package. I don’t think that there is better value out there for what it provides. Sure, there are some disadvantages for users of exotic sensors like the Fuji X-trans so it’s understandable that there will be a sense of injury should the Adobe engine not be demosaicing your RAW files properly. But for the rest of us this represents a truly wonderful opportunity to get the industry’s gold standard image editing software for what amounts to peanuts. I think it’s great. View full article
  6. A few months ago Adobe introduced us to another of their innovative products, namely Lightroom Mobile, which now comes bundled with their Photography subscription package that I wrote about in my previous article. Lightroom Mobile seems like a very good idea. The basic premise is that you can use Lightroom Desktop to sync collections of images across the internet and into your iPad or iPhone. You can also import images from your device’s Camera Roll into a collection you make in the iPad, which is then synced back to your Desktop app. Sounds good, doesn’t it? So why has its reception been so lukewarm? To get an answer to this question I set out on a quest to find a good use for Lr Mobile in my current workflow. How can I use this innovative product in a way that makes sense and is actually useful to me? Here’s what I found out. Scenario: using the iPad as an image presentation tool As anybody who uses an iPad will tell you, getting images into the thing from your desktop requires a bit of digital hopscotch. You have to do it via iTunes sync and choose a folder on your Mac/PC that you want to sync photos from if you’re not using the abysmal Apple iPhoto app. So if I wanted to have collections of images to show prospective clients on my iPad I would have to export them from Lightroom into folders on my Mac, then instruct iTunes as to where they are and run a sync. It’s not difficult, but it’s not exactly convenient either. With Lr Mobile I can bypass the step of exporting jpg’s to the sync’ed Mac folder completely just by creating collections in Lr Desktop and syncing those collections with Lr Mobile. When I open my Lr Mobile app I should see them there on the front page. To display them for clients I open the collection and tap on the thumbnails. This opens a bigger image and I can slide between them when presenting to a client or use the built in slideshow feature of the app. Upside? If you’re sitting with your client and selecting images you can flag or star rate images as you go just by swiping up or down. These get synced back to Lr Desktop so when you’re ready to do a full editing of that shoot you have got a subset to work from. Downside? It can sometimes take a while for the images to sync across the internet, depending on how fast your internet connection is. What would be nice in this workflow situaion is if you could annotate the images as you were going through them. Sometimes when I’m sitting reviewing images with a client they will make a suggestion like “Can you make my arse look not so big in this shot?” to which I would usually reply with a clever chirp and make a note somewhere to do the impossible to image number X123. If I could type notes to myself in the app that would be a great feature. Conclusion: if you’re a Lr Desktop user this is a neater, more intelligent way to show your images to clients - and the hopscotch steps are fewer too. Scenario: sharing images In Lr Mobile this is done very much the same as it’s done in most i-device apps these days. With an image open you look for the icon of a square with an upwards arrow pointing out of it and on tapping it there are a number of options you can chose from, including Airdrop, Facebook, Twitter, Email and iMessage. I was disappointed to see that there is no Airplay option. It’s always impressive to transmit images from your device to a large screen TV. I’ve never done it in a workflow situation, but I imagine that if you were to take along your little Apple TV device to a client’s house or office you could plug it into their flatscreen and view the images on there instead of on the device. I guess colour issues might become something to worry about if you did that since most TV’s are not calibrated. Upside? It’s easy to share using the technology. Downside? It’s not so easy to share outside of the Apple ecosystem, except via email. Apple really need to give us the ability to Bluetooth files to nearby devices that don’t have technologies like Airdrop. Conclusion: it’s good for sharing, but it’s unlikely that you’re going to sync things to your iPad just so that you can post them to Facebook or Twitter when you can do the same thing from your full featured desktop Lightroom. Scenario: editing images in Lr Mobile This is where the cookie breaks down. In its current offering Lr Mobile is very limited in terms of what it can edit. You have access to the usual basic editing sliders that you have in Lr Desktop, such as exposure, highlights, shadows, etc, but you don’t have access to the more advanced features, such as adjustment brushes, gradient, spot removal and all those other things that make Lr Desktop such a great program to use. Why would you want to edit your images in a mobile device that for all intents and purposes is more for consumption of media than production of it? The only thing I can think of using this for is in the aforementioned situation where I’m sitting with a client and we’re going through some images and I might need to do a rough edit of exposure, white balance, or something like that. Other than that I can see no good reason to ever want to edit seriously on my iPad (which is a Mini so my screen real estate is few). Upside? You can also make minor exposure adjustments or apply a Lightroom Preset to your images. Downside? You can’t apply any of the presets you create or use any of the advanced features of Lightroom Desktop. Conclusion: it’s not something you can use effectively for image editing. Applying presets overlays your displayed image, which is not ergonomically good. Some Other Observations Something I was curious about is what exactly LrMobile is storing on your iPad when you sync a collection? Once a collection is synced to the app you don’t see any new images in your iPad’s Camera Roll, so where does the data reside and what data are you actually bringing onto the device? According to the Adobe website when you sync a collection between Desktop and Mobile all it does is transfer the smart previews between your Lr catalog and the mobile device, not the actual images, so storage on your device shouldn’t be an issue, unless you’re syncing some very large collections. It is possible to download the images to the iPad for offline editing but then you definitely start to eat into your storage space, so if you’re using the iPad for a lot of images you’ll need to invest in a pretty large one. I did have a bit of a mind spark in thinking that I could shoot wirelessly directly into Lr Mobile using my Olympus E-M1, but alas that isn’t possible. What I was able to do, however, is use the Olympus Image Share app to shoot wirelessly, save my images to the camera roll on the iPad and then import them to Lr Mobile from there. It works, you can do that, but the problem is that OIS doesn’t bring your RAW data into the iPad, it only brings a jpg, so there’s not a lot you can do with it in Lr Mobile editing wise. Hopefully in the future we will be able to use Lr Mobile as a tethering app for advanced cameras with wifi in them. I’d love to be able to do that and I don’t see why it isn’t possible, so please Adobe, make it happen for all cameras that have wifi and not just a select few. Will I be using Lr Mobile in real world workflow? It’s unlikely because all the good editing you can only do on the desktop version and to be honest, when I am off on safari having the necessary bandwidth to transfer images from desktop to mobile apps is highly unlikely. My real world use will probably be limited to creating small portfolios of work to show prospective clients, as described above. An image imported from my iPad's Camera Roll.
  7. A few months ago Adobe introduced us to another of their innovative products, namely Lightroom Mobile, which now comes bundled with their Photography subscription package that I wrote about in my previous article. Lightroom Mobile seems like a very good idea. The basic premise is that you can use Lightroom Desktop to sync collections of images across the internet and into your iPad or iPhone. You can also import images from your device’s Camera Roll into a collection you make in the iPad, which is then synced back to your Desktop app. Sounds good, doesn’t it? So why has its reception been so lukewarm? To get an answer to this question I set out on a quest to find a good use for Lr Mobile in my current workflow. How can I use this innovative product in a way that makes sense and is actually useful to me? Here’s what I found out. Scenario: using the iPad as an image presentation tool As anybody who uses an iPad will tell you, getting images into the thing from your desktop requires a bit of digital hopscotch. You have to do it via iTunes sync and choose a folder on your Mac/PC that you want to sync photos from if you’re not using the abysmal Apple iPhoto app. So if I wanted to have collections of images to show prospective clients on my iPad I would have to export them from Lightroom into folders on my Mac, then instruct iTunes as to where they are and run a sync. It’s not difficult, but it’s not exactly convenient either. With Lr Mobile I can bypass the step of exporting jpg’s to the sync’ed Mac folder completely just by creating collections in Lr Desktop and syncing those collections with Lr Mobile. When I open my Lr Mobile app I should see them there on the front page. To display them for clients I open the collection and tap on the thumbnails. This opens a bigger image and I can slide between them when presenting to a client or use the built in slideshow feature of the app. Upside? If you’re sitting with your client and selecting images you can flag or star rate images as you go just by swiping up or down. These get synced back to Lr Desktop so when you’re ready to do a full editing of that shoot you have got a subset to work from. Downside? It can sometimes take a while for the images to sync across the internet, depending on how fast your internet connection is. What would be nice in this workflow situaion is if you could annotate the images as you were going through them. Sometimes when I’m sitting reviewing images with a client they will make a suggestion like “Can you make my arse look not so big in this shot?” to which I would usually reply with a clever chirp and make a note somewhere to do the impossible to image number X123. If I could type notes to myself in the app that would be a great feature. Conclusion: if you’re a Lr Desktop user this is a neater, more intelligent way to show your images to clients - and the hopscotch steps are fewer too. Scenario: sharing images In Lr Mobile this is done very much the same as it’s done in most i-device apps these days. With an image open you look for the icon of a square with an upwards arrow pointing out of it and on tapping it there are a number of options you can chose from, including Airdrop, Facebook, Twitter, Email and iMessage. I was disappointed to see that there is no Airplay option. It’s always impressive to transmit images from your device to a large screen TV. I’ve never done it in a workflow situation, but I imagine that if you were to take along your little Apple TV device to a client’s house or office you could plug it into their flatscreen and view the images on there instead of on the device. I guess colour issues might become something to worry about if you did that since most TV’s are not calibrated. Upside? It’s easy to share using the technology. Downside? It’s not so easy to share outside of the Apple ecosystem, except via email. Apple really need to give us the ability to Bluetooth files to nearby devices that don’t have technologies like Airdrop. Conclusion: it’s good for sharing, but it’s unlikely that you’re going to sync things to your iPad just so that you can post them to Facebook or Twitter when you can do the same thing from your full featured desktop Lightroom. Scenario: editing images in Lr Mobile This is where the cookie breaks down. In its current offering Lr Mobile is very limited in terms of what it can edit. You have access to the usual basic editing sliders that you have in Lr Desktop, such as exposure, highlights, shadows, etc, but you don’t have access to the more advanced features, such as adjustment brushes, gradient, spot removal and all those other things that make Lr Desktop such a great program to use. Why would you want to edit your images in a mobile device that for all intents and purposes is more for consumption of media than production of it? The only thing I can think of using this for is in the aforementioned situation where I’m sitting with a client and we’re going through some images and I might need to do a rough edit of exposure, white balance, or something like that. Other than that I can see no good reason to ever want to edit seriously on my iPad (which is a Mini so my screen real estate is few). Upside? You can also make minor exposure adjustments or apply a Lightroom Preset to your images. Downside? You can’t apply any of the presets you create or use any of the advanced features of Lightroom Desktop. Conclusion: it’s not something you can use effectively for image editing. Applying presets overlays your displayed image, which is not ergonomically good. Some Other Observations Something I was curious about is what exactly LrMobile is storing on your iPad when you sync a collection? Once a collection is synced to the app you don’t see any new images in your iPad’s Camera Roll, so where does the data reside and what data are you actually bringing onto the device? According to the Adobe website when you sync a collection between Desktop and Mobile all it does is transfer the smart previews between your Lr catalog and the mobile device, not the actual images, so storage on your device shouldn’t be an issue, unless you’re syncing some very large collections. It is possible to download the images to the iPad for offline editing but then you definitely start to eat into your storage space, so if you’re using the iPad for a lot of images you’ll need to invest in a pretty large one. I did have a bit of a mind spark in thinking that I could shoot wirelessly directly into Lr Mobile using my Olympus E-M1, but alas that isn’t possible. What I was able to do, however, is use the Olympus Image Share app to shoot wirelessly, save my images to the camera roll on the iPad and then import them to Lr Mobile from there. It works, you can do that, but the problem is that OIS doesn’t bring your RAW data into the iPad, it only brings a jpg, so there’s not a lot you can do with it in Lr Mobile editing wise. Hopefully in the future we will be able to use Lr Mobile as a tethering app for advanced cameras with wifi in them. I’d love to be able to do that and I don’t see why it isn’t possible, so please Adobe, make it happen for all cameras that have wifi and not just a select few. Will I be using Lr Mobile in real world workflow? It’s unlikely because all the good editing you can only do on the desktop version and to be honest, when I am off on safari having the necessary bandwidth to transfer images from desktop to mobile apps is highly unlikely. My real world use will probably be limited to creating small portfolios of work to show prospective clients, as described above. An image imported from my iPad's Camera Roll. View full article
  8. I hope somebody here can answer a question I have about the Adobe Creative Cloud, since my question on their forums has gone unanswered for the past week. Since I joined the cloud they installed Photoshop CS6 on my system as well as Photoshop CC and Bridge. I wasn't expecting CS6, so I guess that's some kind of a bonus? Anyway, it's not the reason why I am making this post. I have noticed that all these programs receive pretty heavy updates on an almost daily basis. Sometimes twice a day and sometimes three times a day. I'm talking about gigs of updates at a time. Today I have updated CS6, CC and Bridge twice already. Why are we getting so many updates? Here's another weird thing, I have the CC running on both my Macs. The updates are sporadic between the two. I get updates on the MBP that don't happen on the Mini. Then a week or so goes by and I get updates on the Mini and not on the MBP. The details show different things being updated. Is this normal?
  9. The Lightroom 5 software from Adobe was released out of beta today and is now available as a new perpetual licence for $159 or as an upgrade for $85. If you don't want to buy the perpetual license you can rent it as a part of your Creative Cloud package for $49.99 a month (provided you commit to the suite for at least a year, otherwise you're in for $75 a month). Given the recent uproar over the move to monthly licensing from Adobe, I'm interested to see how many people will upgrade legally to the new Lightroom 5 on a perpetual license. Do you have any concerns that if you do decide to give them the licence fee now that in the future you may be forced to move over to the Creative Cloud and pay for it monthly? Speaking for myself, I am tempted to upgrade for the $85, but yes, there are concerns that next year Adobe might have a change of mind and decide to only make Lightroom available through the very expensive monthly cloud subscription. It's a big concern. What's your feeling? Does your photography need Lightroom 5 and are you willing to run the risk of it eventually only being a cloud product?
  10. Yesterday the people at Adobe Systems announced that they are not going to be selling perpetual licenses (Creative Suite) for their products any longer. What that means is that you cannot download and pay for the newest version of (say) Photoshop and expect it to continue to work forever on your computer using a license code. Instead you will have to connect to the internet to use the program and pay them on a monthly basis for the privilege of doing so. There are some positives to be gleaned from this move, the most obvious being that if you subscribe to the full Creative Cloud (CC) for $50 a month you will have access to all the programs Adobe produces. On the other hand if you only want Photoshop you'll have to pay $20 a month. If you have a CS6 license they are offering the newer programs for $10 a month. For now. This week we're asking two questions from the users. What do you think about this move? Will it benefit you or is it just another greedy plot from a huge corporation to extract more money from your wallet?
  11. Well... mine does. The first time the problem was solved with a complete uninstall/reinstall of the entire Design Standard suite. According to the rep having various older versions of Acrobat on the computer might have caused some DLL clashing. A good theory, plausible, but as with all theories, not always correct. About a month later the problem recurred. This time I had the installation files at hand (from the last time), and it solved the problem. What I did not notice, was that the problem did not occur “about” one month later... It occured exactly one month later (those of you who already start saying ahaa... chapeau—I didn't get it yet) And now it happened again. Tired of yet another uninstall/install cycle, I decided to google the problem. Besides that, by now there are throngs and throngs of very pissed off Adobe users who encounter the same problem, and indeed Teh Googul revealed the mystery to me. It's a problem that occurs once every 30 days. What else is 30 days in Acrobat Pro? You guessed it! The trial period. Basically Adobe's DRM is foobarred and Acrobat Pro thinks it’s in trial mode, and shuts down after 30 days. Without bothering to tell you why, which would give you a f####g clue to solve the problem in the first place. I came across this on the Adobe forums and apparently this will solve the problem. It did for me, although I won’t really know until 30 days from now (and I am not willing to fiddle with the clock to find out right now). But according to the help desk rep in the pasted transcript this is a permament fix. Edit: the transcript looked great when I pasted it, and like crap after posting. So I'm fixing that right now. OFFICIAL FIX FOR THIS PROBLEM --- THIS IS WHAT I GOT DIRECTLY FROM ADOBE SUPPORT -- Please view transcript Raghu: Hi Matt . Raghu: I have received your query. Please allow me a moment to verify your account and to review the details of your request. Raghu: I understand that you are unable to open Acrobat X on Windows 7. Raghu: Am I correct ? Matt Lok: yes but it worked before Matt Lok: and all the other apps on the cs6 master suite works Raghu: Okay, I'll be glad to assist you with that. Raghu: Please navigate to C:\program files(X86)\Common files\Adobe\Adobe PCD. Matt Lok: ok Raghu: Open Cache folder. Matt Lok: ok i see 1 file - cache.db Raghu: Please move it to desktop. Matt Lok: ok done Raghu: Please open Photoshop from CS 6 suite. Matt Lok: ok i opened the x64 version of photoshop Raghu: Click on 'Help' > 'deactivate'. Matt Lok: ok it's deactivated Raghu: Please close it and open it back and activate it. Matt Lok: ok i signed in to the adobe account and then it launched photoshop Matt Lok: deactivated is greyed out Raghu: Okay fine, please open Acrobat X now. Matt Lok: ok i opened it and now it said 30 day trial Raghu: Do you have the option for 'License this software' ? Matt Lok: yes Raghu: Click on that please. Raghu: Any issues ? Matt Lok: i just did the activation Raghu: Okay please let me know if any issues. Raghu: Are we still connected ? Matt Lok: yes Matt Lok: just testing Matt Lok: it seems to be ok Raghu: Great. Matt Lok: but is this a permanant fix Matt Lok: or do i have to do this again later Raghu: Please close Acrobat X and open it to test once again. Matt Lok: seems to be ok now Raghu: This is a permanent fix Matt. Raghu: Acrobat X will work without any issues. Matt Lok: ok great Raghu: No need to worry about it. Raghu: Is there anything else I can help you with? Matt Lok: that's about it, everything else works 100%. Thanks again for helping
  12. I've had Lightroom for a few years but I have never really used it as a work flow tool, preferring to do things in my own uniquely old school way. Up until last week whenever I did a shoot I would copy the images I took from the memory cards onto folders in my hard drive and then process them from there using a variety of tools, including PS, Capture NX and various other things, saving the edits and conversions into their own sub-folders. I would rely on my own memory as a means of finding certain images. But, even being as ridiculously intelligent as I am (ahem) even I find the curse of middle age and its effect on my memory to be a burden. Finding images easily is a chore and then re-editing them an even bigger chore (because being who I am I do make different edits of the same image and finding the one I want sometimes really sends me rushing for the aspirin). So yesterday I decided to enlighten myself a bit about how this whole Lightroom thing actually works. I read some of Scott Kelby's excellent book on LR3 and OMG - I feel like an ass for not doing this earlier. Let's just say I have seen the light. In the past I was always annoyed with how when loading images into LR I would see a decent image at first, but then it would lose all it's shine and become something very flat and boring looking. I always thought that this was a deficiency of LR, but in reality all that's happening is that you're seeing the RAW file without any camera profile attached to it. He points out in the book that you can actually get the profiles (like Nikon's D2X Mode III which I use exclusively) in the camera profiles section of the develop module, and even create a preset for that so that when you import your images into LR, it will apply the profile to each one. Yay! Going through the book I found many other things that LR does that I would toil over needlessly in the past (hey, just remember, I got into digital photography long before anything like LR even existed). Needless to say I am now a Lightroom convert and will be investigating the possibility of upgrading to version 4 soon.
  13. I was in need of Adobe's customer service today; my acrobat reader pro had stopped working. The culprit turned out to be the regular reader that was preinstalled before installing CS6. Although I had joked to the customer service rep that I once had a Microsoft call of two hours, this one turned out to take just as long—uninstalling acrobat reader, testing, uninstalling acrobat pro, more testing, downloading the CS6 Design suite, installing it (with the various reboots of course) and finally testing everything. Unlike the help desk at work, whose only target is to close as many tickets as possible (preferably before the issue is resolved, that way they can close another ticket on it–the system is flawed), the rep insisted I would take my time and test everything thoroughly before concluding that everything was solved. Yes, you pay through the nose for Adobe products, but this is the second time I needed their assistance (the first one was migrating CS4/win to CS5/mac) and I'm very impressed with their customer service.
  14. A friend of mine uses Lightroom 3 at work and Lightroom 4 at home. She's asking me if it is possible to work with both versions (I assume sharing the same database). Does LR4 enforce a new database format or can it use the old format? (Just like Access 2003 can work with Access 97 databases - you might not be able to create a new one but you can work with an existing one. Then again Microsoft seems to take backward compatibility more serious than Adobe)
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