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fafield

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fafield last won the day on 20 May

fafield had the most liked content!

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5 of my posts have been liked

About fafield

  • Rank

  • Birthday 01/01/1

Profile Information

  • Real Name
    Frank Field
  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    The Sea Ranch, California, US
  • Interests
    Landscape photography
  • Edit my pics?
    Ask Me
  • Fav. Camera
    Nikon
  • Fav. Lens
    Any of the AI-S circa 1980s primes!
  • Fav. Editor
    LIghtroom user since release 1.0 in 2007
  1. fafield

    Lean On Automation, Rely On Manual

    For landscape images, most of what I shoot, I shoot in fully manual mode with spot metering or mostly manual in aperture priority with center weighting nearly all the time including manually focusing my lenses, usually with live view. I should be shooting a view camera. I've been shooting Nikon cameras since the 1980s. I owned the FA, Nikon's camera that pioneered matrix metering, several other film-based cameras with matrix metering and now several DSLRs with MM. Try as I might, I have never warmed up to matrix metering. Nikon's algorithm is heavily biased to set exposure based on what is under the focus point. I frequently want to focus and recompose which causes MM to fall apart. If using flash, I do take advantage of Nikon's creative lighting system -- it is a big help with managing multiple flashes and getting the exposure pretty much where I want it the first time. If there is any action in the scene, then of course I will move to auto-focus with aperture priority. I have found that Nikon's newer cameras with 90k pixel RGB sensors (D750 and up) do a fabulous job of focus tracking. Earlier and lower-end cameras with 2k pixel RGB sensors are much less capable of focus tracking. Some of my habits come from the film days when I shot transparency film nearly all the time. You simply had to set exposure based on the highlights or be faced with a slide with annoying texture and color-free highlights. While digital sensors today have far better latitude and range, I still do much of my metering for the highlights. My initial Nikon camera, the FG, had Program mode. I did not use it then and believe I've never used it.
  2. fafield

    Websites For Photographers: The Best Approach

    Dallas -- I, too, use WordPress as the basis for my website. I have been impressed by its ever-growing capabilities as a content management system. And, I've been even more impressed by the quality and functionality that open-source development by a gaggle of volunteers has been able to deliver. Frankly, the very low regression defect rate of the WordPress team puts some of the major vendors of photo software to shame. (A regression defect occurs when a change to the software, say for a new feature, breaks some other feature that used to work.) One caution about WordPress. It is the most popular content management system on the internet. I have seen reports suggesting something well above 25% of the websites on the internet are based on WordPress. That's both a tribute and a caution. The hackers of the world are thus attracted to WordPress-based sites. Any website based on WordPress MUST have a security management strategy and framework. There are good tools available, such as WordFence, for little or no cost that can be quite effective in warding off ill-intended visitors to your site. Many of the popular hosting companies provide free tutorials on security strategy and some offer low-cost services consulting on security for WordPress. I've been running on WordPress for three or four years now and would never consider going anyplace else. Regards, Frank
  3. fafield

    Daily Grind, Workflow & Luminosity Masking

    Dallas - Sounds as though the real estate photography is doing well. Hope you are able to find both enjoyment and a dependable addition to your income stream. As for Photoshop, I could not agree more. While the evolution of Lightroom has been very good and enabled less use of Photoshop, that same less use makes it more difficult to use when you must resort to it! Photoshop is definitely one of those skills that atrophies rapidly if not used frequently. Regards, Frank
  4. fafield

    The Design Of Things

    Dallas -- These images are a huge step-up from what I see our local realtors using. The majority of the houses for sale in our area have asking prices of USD 800k to USD 3M. Yet, all but a few of the listings are marketed with images clearly shot with a point and shoot (1" sensor at best). Too, the local RE community seems to have discovered the "clarity" control (or unsharp mask) and just simply push that slider to 100%. Gives the images a unique look -- loads of sharpening artifacts. All this for commission rates usually set at 6% of selling price. Any work a professional can do is bound to make the marketed home stand out. Good luck to you in this endeavor. Frank
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