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danielm

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danielm last won the day on 29 August

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About danielm

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  • Birthday 27/01/1957

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  • Real Name
    Daniel Marchand
  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Montreal, Canada
  • Interests
    For sure photography but also I am curious by definition
  • Edit my pics?
    Ask Me
  • Fav. Camera
    MFT Compact System
  • Fav. Lens
    12-60, 20, 45-150, 42,5
  • Fav. Editor
    Photo (Apple), previously Aperture
  1. danielm

    Digital B&W Photography

    Digital Black & White Photography Since the invention of modern photograph black and white representation have played a key role into the evolution of the medium. For sure color reddition have been preferred over time for its own added pictural information that eventually partly if not almost completely submerge the black and white (B&W) image reproduction. But suffise to mention that still today color processing is using multi layers of B&W sensitive areas with added applied color to the get the final result. But the real question for the photographic enthousiasms of this world is that black and white stays a pertinent way of recording and later diffuse an image output? Because the digital media photo output is now so cheap and easy to obtain that can be very simple to skip the choice between color and B&W reedition and rely in post-processing to make your final decision. So why working in B&W during your picture taking session? Is it redondant? Yes and no because even if it is true that the post treatment possibilities offer the final choice it remains impossible to modifie certains basic photo parameters after the fact like your picture taken position (angle of view) or the moment of the exposure. Those critical element depend on the initial selection done on the very premises of the subject. I wont argue here the virtues of every way of doing photography because in fact they are all justified by the creativity involved in every different processes experimented by the auteur. My point is the following. With contemporary digital camera there is a big new window opened for the B&W photographs in a way that you can actually previsualize your result on screen before the final picture taking action. And that the most interesting aspect of it. No more imperfect (at the most) polaroid tests on the spot to rely. What you over your back screen or electronic viewfinder or your external screen is the "real" visual output. And the technical advancement give a capital advantage to work your B&W output right on the spot something ever dreamed during the traditional film photography era. Doing black and white pictures As for many others picture reproduction techniques doing B&W photography have its own requirements and limitations. A beautiful color scene doesn't always be translated in a magnificent B&W picture. Sometimes yes sometimes definitively not. Because in part of the fact that the color palette offer psychological contrast (between the colors) that BW gray scale is not able to reproduce totally or simply not at all. So different gray patches will blend each other and the final results will be dull and the image information will be difficult to decode. So as you can presume contrast is a key point in B&W photography. As for any photographic processes the exposure (the light levels distribution) is another critical aspect to consider. Because your own eye has a very larger dynamic light perception between the highlight and the lowlight it has been always a challenge to produce image captor that can be able to mimic human eye perception. Today our recent image sensor have revolutionized that frontier limitation at a point never dreamed a few decades ago. But still the exposure factor is another key to faithfully master in order to get the full palette of gray tonal you need. On the opposite side you can always redirect you exposure setting to discriminate voluntary part of the gray scale you don't want to register as for example in creating silhouette subjects. Toning voluntary or not B&W photograph is not a new feature in photography. In the past during the film photography era many paper supports were generating different white tonal renditions from cool to warm as for paper chemical developers that were able to "tint" the silver oxide of the black and gray areas of the picture. Those possibilities have been incorporated in the inboard camera image processors or/and the post processing image applications. It is up to you to decide to register an already (tone) altered image or to wait et the post processing stage of it. B&W photography enhance graphic value by concentring the attention of the looker on the lines, on the forms and the texture of the subject. Tridimensional perception in B&W depends greatly of the composition of your picture. It rely also on the previous visual experiences of the people who will look at it. So selecting, positioning and exposing your main subject are important tasks to fulfill in the creation of a B&W image that will show impact and got a story to tell. Foreground and background will contribute to let the eye to prior focusing on the first glimpse then to voyage over all the picture but they can also play as a distraction of the main message of your picture. The expression of your main living subject will create a major impact to the first perception of the image because as human we will be attracted especially in B&W by the "face" of the subject. So interaction between the photographer and its model or subject is basically what we apprehend at first. Eyes, mouth and facial expression may be the most difficult photographic aspects to master a spontaneous or not portrait. (Partial B&W photography and special effects) Another interest optional feature present in some digital photographic camera is the possibility to remove the entire color palette in profit of only one selected. In that way we create a kind of B&W picture with added color. These studies can be interesting if you carefully compose your image and most important don't forget to still focus on the impact and story of the subject. An array of different "special" and easy photographic effects is now available in digital photography. The danger is that you can distract your auditoire from the main subject as many people can simply skip it. Finally I cannot emphasizes more the importance to explore the medium. Your (documented) research will help you to raffine your quest of a better picture that will suit your own visual expression. Because at the end B&W photography is just another way to communicate your perception of your living surrounding.
  2. danielm

    12-40mm f/2.8 PRO M.Zuiko

    Get in the "pro" side with the Olympus M.Zuiko 12-40mm F2.8 Olympus M.Zuiko 12-40mm F2.8 We know already all the big advantages of using a so-called "Pro" lens. Better construction, larger controls and grip, better quality glasses, constant aperture (most of the time), all weather protection, etc. But "pro" lenses are also larger, heavier and... more expensive. Usually their variable focal length latitude is narrowed compare to the "amateur" counterparts.So it can be tricky to suggest or moreover to recommend such an exclusive product. And I am not a big fan of "bazooka" lenses that are intimidating the subject by their lack of discretion. The only add credibility you can expect from other people when using this type of lenses usually came from persons without real knowledge of photography (especially press credential personal). So you can be rightly suspicious when I decide to bring you this specific and modest personal review about the Olympus M.Zuiko 12-40mm F/2.8 lens. On the Run (Olympus OM-D E-M5 II / M. 12-40mm F2.8) The Olympus M.Zuiko 12-40mm F\2.8 is in fact a big lens. It is true to say that it is a smaller lens compare to its equivalent in larger image actor format such as APS-C or 24X36mm so-called "full" frame format. Its focal length latitude offers a practical range starting with an interesting wide angle up to a modest telephoto setting. Its constant maximum aperture of F/2.8 is the usual standard for this kind of "pro" product. Olympus OM-D E-M5 II W/Grip / M.12-40mm F2.8 The Olympus M.Zuiko 12-40mm F/2.8 is an impressive piece of glasses in particular if you apply the compactness standards of the m4/3 format. To properly use it you may need a camera model with a greater potential handle grip to be able to handle it with confidence and confort. But I must add that the lens is still usable without add-on grip. As a "Pro" design lens its primary destination is without a doubt the Olympus OM-D E-M1 (in both variations). With the OM-D E-M5 (again in both versions) the optional grip will help you in certain situations like studio or action shooting sessions. That can be said also when you are using the OM-D E-M10 (again and again ... original or Mark II models). The feeling of the 12-40mm F/2.8 lens reveals its high class all weather construction especially in comparaison with the kit zoom lenses such as the M.Zuiko 12-50mm or the diminutive 14-42mm. Control rings for zooming and focusing are fairly larger and can be easily distinctive by the touch. On the spot manual focusing operation is possible by pulling the focus ring very conviently (that specific option is also present into the 12-50mm lens). We appreciate that the lens hood is part of the included accessory packaged with the lens. One of the big advantage of the M.Zuiko 12-40mm F/2.8 is surely its focal length variation starting with a real wide setting of 12mm (84 degrees of angle of view) up to an extended normal angle of view ( 30 degrees) at 40mm. I really consider that telephoto designation should start at 60-75mm focal length in M4/3 format which represent an angle of view of 20-15 degrees to make a visual difference. At that point you get a magnification ratio of 2.5-3X compare to your naked eye. The Olympus M.Zuiko 75mm F/1.8 should be an excellent complement to the M.Zuiko 12-40mm F/2.8. Like I have said earlier the bigger dimensions of "Pro" lenses is often generating intimidating reactions from many spontaneous subjects. It is a price to pay and you may have to earn the confidence of the people you want to photograph prior to the shooting itself. Even the non-initiated person in photography will be aware of the "pro" level of your photo taking device. The performance of the Olympus M.Zuiko 12-40mm lens is on the upper lever flirting with the stellar performances seen on the prime (focal fix) lenses. It is a good substitute product to the 12mm, the 17mm, the 25mm and the 45mm prime lenses although all theses models offer a much larger maximum aperture (F1.8-2) which support a better depth of field control. The extended focal range of the M.12-40mm qualify it as a good urban traveller optic to keep at hand. more than on your chest. And yes it can be a good action lens. If you are looking for a basic "pro" setting the Olympus M.Zuiko 12-40mm F2.8 will be a strong contender to fill the task. And the image results will speak by themself. Good Bye
  3. Guadeloupe: a visit to the French Antilles Island with the Panasonic Lumix GX85 iPhone picture by Manon Paquette Guadeloupe is the designation of a two parts island localized into the French Antilles. A dream island for many French vacationers and retired people with an ideal warm climate. For its own population it can be a different story considering in particular the lack of economical opportunities for the local and especially the youngsters. You can travel for weeks and months to be able to discover the very diversified facettes of the Grande-Terre and Basse-Terre territories which compose the Guadeloupe. Here is some photo extracts that I have done recently with the help of the Panasonic Lumix GX85 and the Lumix G Vario 12-32mm & Lumix G Vario 35-100mm f4-5.6 Mega O.I.S. lenses. The colours of the French Antilles are very attractive but you can also produce beautiful black & white compositions. Architectures subjects, people, flowers, animals, etc are all subjects of discovery and artistic experimentations. A Church at Saint-François, Grande-Terre Marché nocturne (Night Market) at Saint-François, Grande-Terre Marché nocturne (Night Market) at Saint-François, Grande-Terre Jardin botanique (Botanic garden) at Deshaies, Basse-Terre Jardin botanique (Botanic garden) at Deshaies, Basse-Terre Jardin botanique (Botanic garden) at Deshaies, Basse-Terre Jardin botanique (Botanic garden) at Deshaies, Basse-Terre Deshaies, Basse-Tesse Pointe-des-châteaux, Grande-Terre Pointe-des-châteaux, Grande-Terre
  4. danielm

    12-32mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH. MEGA O.I.S

    The Walking Twins: Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-32mm & 35-100mm Mega O.I.S. Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-32mm F3.5-5.6 Mega O.I.S. & Panasonic Lumix G Vario 35-100mm F4.0-5.6 Mega O.I.S. A pocket pair for everyday everywhere travellers! Behind the fact that the traditional camera users tend to be older it is a universal phenomena that most of the people regardless of their respective ages want to be more mobile. In doing so we are looking for devices or equipment with less inconvenient in size and weight. You just have to look at the sport and outdoor accessories evolution since two or three decades to be convinced. Compaticity in photo equipment is an historical quest since the beginning of this new medium. Some photo experts or enthusiasms have and still denigrate the ability of using smaller devices and obtain quality photo results. This debate was particularly fierce during the golden age of 35mm film. Today we know for sure the futility of these assertions. Digital photography is another step to the direction of creating compact, simpler and performing cameras and the introduction of the micro 4/3 image captor format has contributed to establish the credibility of it. Today M4/3 camera system is world widely used and appreciated. For sure in the vast photographic universe there is always place for larger format as it has been proved by the reintroduction of "medium" captor format by Hasselblad and Fujifilm preceded by the Ricoh-Pentax offer without forgetting the digital backs designed by Phase One. Olympus and Panasonic have been the commercial pioneers of the M4/3 format cameras. They have designed very compact devices with different interpretations and priority intended uses. Moreover they develop accordingly an optical offer that suit the compactness primary idea of the new format. Today we will look at a typical lens combination available from the Panasonic line-up. Smart and Compact A small reminder in the recent time-line of the different Lumix models recalls us the Panasonic first introducing of the GM1 and GM5 successor model declinations. They were very small M4/3 cameras and Panasonic had rightly associated these ones with their newest Lumix G Vario 12-32mm f3.5-5.6 Mega O.I.S. diminutive in size standard zoom lens. (see my GM5 report). Soon after Panasonic added the Lumix G Vario 35-100mm F4.0-5.6 Mega O.I.S. tele-zoom lens as a complement of the first one. The whole package is simply the correct expression of many of us consider the real purpose of the compact M4/3 format system introduction. The Panasonic pair lenses are contracting lenses for easy equipment carrying. The Lumix G Vario 12-32mm Mega O.I.S. will be considered by many photographers as their primary lens since it deliver a very useful wide angle of view of 84 degrees similar to the 24mm lens into 24X36mm film format. That wide angle of view is rightly appreciated by many as a very fine and creative contextual lens for street travel, interior or social photography. On the other end of the zoom 32mm focal length you will obtain a narrowed 37 degrees angle of view which is practical but won't have the same versatility compared to others bigger trans-standard zoom lenses such as the Lumix G Vario 12-60mm option. You may consider the 12-32mm more as a wide to normal focal lenght utility lens. No lens hood has been included by Panasonic for the 12-32mm although you may find one from independent manufacturer such as JJC. The filter size diameter is 37mm and could be considered for adding some kind of optical protection or special effect filter. My only complaint is that Panasonic didn't "standardized" its filter size between the 12-32mm and the 35-100mm F4.0-5.6. I would also love that Panasonic have been added the automatic camera shut-off option when you are contracting the lens to its storing position. Lastly no manual focusing ring of the lens. That "flaw" can be partially compensated by using the pre-focusing option on the camera and than reframe your picture thereafter. Using the Lumix G Vario 12-32mm lens more extendedly over the years prove to be a very handy optical device for doing photography "on the spot". Image results are pleasing and could be shared or presented without complex. Even if the 12-32mm have a small maximum aperture you can rely on its ability to do good interior pictures, thanks to its internal optical stabilization combined with the camera in-body counterpart if available. This is a good urban traveler option. The very compact design assimilated with more amateur camera models and in doing so give you a more discrete presence regarding the people surrounding you. If you add a ranger finder style camera the intimidated factor will decrease a lot. For sure quality won't be at the same level compared to to the higher and bigger lens models offered but for most of the digital presentation channel the difference should not be noticed. As usual I never pretend to analyse lenses or cameras on a purely technical point of view knowing that there already exist a lot of more competent people that do so over the Web universe. The Lumix G Vario 35-100mm f4.0-5.6 Mega O.I.S. can be assimilated as the compagnon lens of the 12-32mm if you are looking for that focal length range. The Lumix 35-100mm F4.0-5.6 is a compact optic that can be slip in a coat pocket or in a hand bag without adding volume or exceeding weight. This 2 inches long lens will give you an angle of view variation between 34 and 12 degrees. It comes with a lens hood and you can add a 46mm size filter if you wish (As already mentioned this 46mm diameter is different from the 37mm size of the Lumix 12-32mm). The stabilization lens and cameras options are very essential tools to be activated when you are using the Lumix 35-100mm f4.0-5.6 lens mainly because of its modest maximum aperture and its long focal length. While I have been a strong adept of small focal fixed telephoto lenses such as the Lumix 42.5mm f1.7 OIS and the Olympus M.Zuiko 45mm F1.8 lenses I consider the Lumix G Vario 35-100mm F4.0-5.6 variante as a very good substitute product. For sure it lacks the shallow deep of field characterized of the larger maximum aperture of the two prime but that flaw can be partly compensated by the longer final 100mm focal length of the zoom lens. Because of its inherent compactness the Lumix 35-100mm fF4.0-5.6 is again a very non-intruse lens that facilite the casual picture session. In my view there is no quality issue regarding the image output of this lens. And again stabilization option is a key factor for reaching beautiful picture results. Because of its particular medium telephoto focal length the Lumix 35-100mm f4.0-5.6 can be a real composition tool with a good isolation and compression of the main subject. As I have already mentioned in the past I consider the mirrorless camera category as the real modern successor of the basic idea of a compact camera device with the interchangeable lens option. A kind of Leica legacy of our today world. For sure direct Web connectivity has to be addressed by the different M4/3 format camera manufacturers in the near future to respond to our actuel need of personal communication. But at least the basic of the photographic technique parts are fulfilled already. Yes the Panasonic twins Vario G 12-32mm F3.5-5.6 and 35-100mm F4.0-5.6 Mega O.I.S. are representing a very attractive and competent combination for compact photography.
  5. Le Panasonic Lumix GX9 (GX7 Mark III): la synthèse de la continuité / The summation of recurrent ideas (Please note that the english version follow the french text) La synthèse de la continuité Le Panasonic Lumix GX9 est un incompris pour certains photoblogistes qui anticipait lors de sa présentation la reproduction d'un nouveau modèle Lumix "à la GX8" sur-vitaminé! En fait l'ancien Lumix GX8 était plutôt une sorte d'anomalie dans l'univers jusque là connu de la série GX par la plus grande dimension de son boitier particulièrement si on le comparait à son prédécesseur, le GX7. Ce qui fut confirmé par Panasonic même dans la dénomination nippone du modèle GX85 / GX80 répondant au nom de GX7 Mark II sur le marché japonais. Et le Panasonic GX9 retrouve maintenant un format de boitier plus compact et discret. On peut parler de véritable synthèse des différentes caractéristiques propres aux modèles GX antérieurs et récents à partir du GX7. Certes l'abandon de la caractéristique unique de la protection accrue contre les intempéries du GX8 (mais qui était absente de tous les autres anciens GX il faut dire) est peut-être l'élément le plus choquant, j'en conviens personnellement. Mais une fois avalée cette pilule un peu amère, le Panasonic Lumix GX9 reste un appareil tout à fait épatant sans être clinquant cependant. Son apparence modeste, une signature récurrence des designs de Panasonic pour la série Lumix, est un atout sérieux pour le ou la photographe urbain(e), le ou la voyagiste ou encore la photographie spontanée de tout genre. Le capteur MFT de 20 méga-pixels est maintenant un produit éprouvé sous plusieurs déclinaisons tant chez Panasonic qu'Olympus. La qualité d'image reconnue de ce capteur lui confère un rendement supérieur et son traitement post-prise de vues est très bien maitrisé. La colorimétrie embarquée est plaisante et tout à fait para-métrable au goût des utilisateurs s'ils le souhaitent. Les options monochromes noir & blanc sont riches et facilement accessibles de l'interface car comme à l'accoutumé, le Lumix GX9 est d'ailleurs presqu'entièrement configurable au choix de son ou sa propriétaire. Il n'y a aucun doute à être en mesure de produire des fichiers d'images tout à fait utilisables et détaillées pour le tirage d'art sur du papier d'impression spécialisé. La tenue en main est celle d'un compact avec viseur décentré (à la rangefinder) qui est la résultante d'un compromis entre le petit format du boitier et l'accessibilité aux fonctionnalités du boitier. À ce propos il est inutile d'entamer un débat d'où il ressort que le choix logique du photographe d'action ou sportif serait plutôt un Lumix à viseur centré à la (D)SLR comme les G85 / G80, G9 ou GH5! C'est donc dans l'ordre des choses que la préhension du Lumix GX9 apparaisse minimaliste pour les tenants du design de type SLR. Il y a toujours un apprentissage à considérer dans la manipulation un boitier compact et le Lumix GX9 n'échappe à cette règle (Rappelons toutefois que le GX8 était une exception à cette règle compte tenu des dimensions accrues du boitier). L'étude de la poignée optionnelle DMW-HGR2 est intéressante mais rend l'accès au compartiment de la carte mémoire et de la pile plus difficile, un remodelage plus pratique serait bienvenue. Le viseur électronique (EVF) du Panasonic Lumix GX9 reprend essentiellement les caractéristiques techniques de celui utilisé dans le modèle Lumix GX85 / GX80 avec cependant l'option du pivotement vers le haut comme chez les précédents Lumix GX7 et GX8. Cet option d'orientation peut simuler adéquatement les anciens viseurs-poitrines offerts pour certains modèles d'appareils reflex argentiques professionnels. Ce viseur électronique génère une bonne qualité d'image avec un biais typique un peu contrasté pour un sujet au soleil à contre-jour. Son relief d'oeil est bien pour un usage à l'oeil nu mais peut paraitre étriqué pour un porteur de lunettes correctrices (dont je suis...). L'écran-arrière ACL est également orientable vers le haut et le bas ce qui lui confère un avantage indéniable en reprographie, photo-macrographie et proxi-photographie. Les différentes touches et rondelles d'opération sont aisément accessibles mais compte tenu de leur proximité le risque de mise en route involontaire est plus élevé que pour un appareil de plus grandes dimensions. L'interface est classiquement celui élaboré par Panasonic pour ses appareils photo numériques. Les inspirateurs Lumix GX85 / GX80 / GX7 Mark II Il est évident qu'à plusieurs points de vue le Lumix GX85 / GX80 a servi d'inspiration et de moule créatif pour le Lumix GX9. Cette parenté n'est pas pour autant réductrice si on considère que le GX85 / GX80 constituait comme un retour à l'esprit original sous-jacent du Lumix GX7 par ses dimensions et son flash intégré. Sur le terrain ces deux qualités sont spécialement appréciées par l'utilisateur discret, spontané et flexible. Lumix GX7 original Avec l'usage on peut apprécier également la présence d'un sélecteur de type de mise au point bien accessible, de la roulette des coefficients de correction d'exposition, du bouton d'activation de mémorisation d'exposition et de l'option du menu rapide (Quick Menu) entre autres touches-fonctions. Le flash intégré permet de déboucher les ombres pour des sujets peu distancés. Il peut servir aussi d'unité de commande dans une combinaison de multi-flashes sans-fil. Comme à l'accoutumée je ne traiterai pas des fonctionnalisés propres à un usage vidéo. Avec le format plus réduit du Panasonic Lumix GX9 le choix de l'optique approprié tant par son utilité propre et sa capacité à se marier physiquement au boitier revet une importance incontournable. Le manufacturier propose d'emblée l'objectif-zoom trans-standard Lumix G Vario 12-60mm F3.5-5.6 Power OIS, un choix judicieux de par sa versatilité, son faible poids (210g) et son tarif coupé. Évidemment toute autre optique au choix du photographe reste la prérogative de celui-ci. Le Lumix GX9 s'harmonise très bien d'un objectif à focale fixe et les résultats obtenus avec cette combinaison sont souvent supérieurs à la moyenne et à ceux offerts par les objectifs-zoom sauf exception. Avec ses dimensions compactes Panasonic pourrait nous proposer une combinaison appareil-objectif qui combinerait le Lumix GX9 avec le diminutif Lumix G Vario 12-32mm F3.5-5.6 Mega OIS à l'exemple de son prédécesseur le Lumix GX85. Pourquoi le 12-60mm a été préféré? Peut-être en vertu de son design optique plus récent, sa stabilisation plus efficace (Power versus Mega) et sa plus grande amplitude de distances focales. Il se peut que l'exigence du capteur de 20MP soit un peu trop élevé pour l'ancien 12-32mm. À titre de comparaison personnelle j'ai brièvement équipé le Lumix GX9 de l'objectif G Vario 12-32mm F3.5-5.6 Mega Vario sans observer une chute spectaculaire de la qualité des images obtenues par rapport au 12-60mm. Peut-être ma copie du 12-32mm est exceptionnellement fabriquée! Je m'en voudrais de ne pas vous suggérer quelques accessoires d'appoint comme une pile-accu supplémentaire (ou plus) indispensable pour l'usage prolongé de ce type d'appareil, un flash externe qui évite de taxer indument l'alimentation de l'appareil si vous avez une propension à utiliser fréquemment cet éclairage d'appoint et peut-être une poignée optionnelle si vous utilisez des objectifs de plus grandes dimensions et de poids plus élevé. Comme la plupart des appareils photo numérique à viseur décentré, le Panasonic Lumix GX9 est beaucoup moins intimidant que ses collègues à viseur centré de type (D)SLR. Cette caractéristique rend beaucoup plus aisé la cohabitation du sujet avec son photographe. Même en cette ère d'égo-portraits en toute occasion le contact entre l'auteur et son sujet reste complexe et exige toujours d'une relation de confiance minimale. Le Lumix GX9 répond bien à cette exigence de discrétion et de compétence demandée. Si vous l'associez avec un objectif "toute éventualité" comme les Lumix G 20mm ou 25mm F1.7 ou encore comme le petit téléobjectif Lumix G 42.5mm F1.7 Mega OIS, vous serez en mesure de réaliser de superbes images et de maintenir la spontanéité de votre sujet principal. Le Panasonic Lumix GX9 n'est peut-être un appareil de poche mais c'est assurément un compact qui répond bien à la définition originale de faible encombrement du format MFT. En tout comme en particulier il s'avère un appareil photo numérique traditionnel compétent, versatile et complet. Plus encore c'est certainement un compagnon idéal mais discret pour la photographie au quotidien qui encourage l'impulsion créatrice de son utilisateur. Tous mes remerciements à Panasonic Canada et à Yannick pour leur support et le prêt de ce nouveau modèle Lumix GX9. P.s. Pas de panique! On ne peut pas s'empêcher de spéculer des intentions d'autrui et de ce que nous réserve l'avenir. Ainsi il y a cette rumeur de l'abandon de produire des appareils MFT à objectifs interchangeables dont le tarif serait d'entrée et de moyenne gamme par Panasonic pour sa série Lumix. Bien sûr une telle perspective n'est pas souhaitable et le maintien de modèles plus abordables comme dans les séries GX et G nous garantie l'apport renouvelé de nouveaux adeptes du format. Mais il existe cette réalité d'un marché pour l'appareil photo numérique traditionnel en plein resserrement qui contribue à une psychose de l'extinction de l'espèce par la disparition des marques et fabricants certes toujours possible mais pas seulement lié à ce seul facteur. L'industrie de l'équipement photographique comme toute autre du domaine technologique a connu et connaitra toujours des évolutions et des mutations profondes de temps en temps, c'est écrit dans le ciel de notre monde matérialiste. Mais aujourd'hui ne diffère pas fondamentalement d'hier et qui put vraiment "prédire" l'avenir! - DM The summation of recurrent ideas Handholding a camera can be a very deceptive experience and can give you that you think you have finally found one of the best photo device you ever have tried. Certainly it was my own impression regarding the late Panasonic Lumix GX8 which was a bigger package compared to the previous Lumix GX7 but was doted with a more secure grip and a new and more definite image sensor (20MP vs 16MP). So memories on the Lumix GX8 were pleasant especially if you compare with the Lumix GX85 (GX7 Mark II) smaller version and its reduced dimension and its less interesting image captor (again 16MP). Many previous users of Lumix GX8 and even GX7 (Mark I) were badly surprised Panasonic have chosen to recycle the GX85 design concept to their newest GX9. Many early reviewers (if not almost all) were badly astonished by this choice from the manufacturer. So the Lumix GX9 (named elsewhere GX7 Mark III) has disappear from the reviewers radar on a fast pace. In my book on the search for compactness it is a pity to simply ignore that new model Lumix GX9. If you consider the very nature of the M4/3 sensor format the Lumix GX9 rightly respond to that mandate in size and weight. The Panasonic Lumix GX9 is a compact ILC in MFT sensor format as we were trilled to discover in the early years of that format. The conceptual idea to produce a very small photo device along with the appropriated lenses was without contest a very critical success although not so good commercially. But in some ways it has survived mainly with higher end models like the Lumix GX7 and GX8 or the Olympus Pen-F. The Lumix GX9 is not obviously a SLR type camera with a centered viewfinder since it mimiques the "rangefinder" style with an off-center electronic viewfinder (EVF). The swivel EVF option to the upper position allows the photographer to experiment a kind of chest level position that will give a more equilibrated point of view in helping to preserve the lateral and vertical straight lines. In some ways it refers to the older waist level viewfinders of the film era. The Lumix GX9 is a compact camera but it has in own surprising weight that give more stability induced by the inertie phenomena. That can annoying for those who are looking for a very light pocket photo device which is not the case with the GX9. Furthermore in associating the Lumix GX9 with the Lumix G Vario 12-60mm F3.5-5.6 Power OIS lens (a good optic in many ways) the combined package is relatively large in dimensions and partly destroy the compactness idea. For very discrete street or urban photography many will prefer to use a smaller lens such as the Lumix G 20mm F1.7 or the 25mm F1.7 or even the G Vario 12-32mm Mega OIS. As usual Panasonic have designed a very classic interface presentation with almost all the function buttons and dials located on the right upper deck and rear side of the camera leaving main control on the right hand, your left palm hand serving as a stand under the taking lens and giving you a natural option to control your focusing ring and zoom cal range if available. Direct autofocus lever selector is a very handy feature as for the AE/AF locking button. Separate exposure correction dial is also a very appreciated option but the reel is located a bit far on the right upper edge of the camera body to an easy thumb control. Multi-fonction front and rear dials make easy selection of basic parameters such s shutter speed and aperture depending which exposure program you have chosen. The Panasonic Lumix GX9 offers you an infinity of configuration variations that allow a very deep personalization of the camera. The viewfinder will give a good preview (but seems to be a bit too constraty) and the back screen definition is fine and will give you a nice appreciation of the scene and a good preview of the final image result. I didn't feel handicapped compare to a classic optical viewfinder. No lag impression are generated by panning the subject. It is true to say that EVF have come a long way their first technical interpretation a few years ago. They are now reliable tools for the photographer. In the camera body the small electronic flash is a fine addition to perform fill-in flash on the spot. Mixing available daylight and flash burst can be done with confidence once you master the different options of memorizing the ambiant and flash light exposures. As usual for that GX series you can add an external compact flash light in order to get greater output and have an independant battery flash power. Taking pictures with the Panasonic Lumix GX9 is an easy task. The camera can stay on hand and be ready on the spot if necessary. You just have to remind you that the Lumix GX9 is not weather protected. In comparaison with the previous Lumix GX8 it is surely a deception. So you have to think about securing the camera under fairly adverses picture taking conditions. Is this point could be addressed in the next GX one digit itineration of the model? It has to be seen in the future. The best definition that can suit the Panasonic Lumix GX9 is its summation of recurrent ideas that we have already seen on the previous GX Lumixes. Cost considerations forced Panasonic to drop beloved features like the weather sealing and may be a larger body size for a better handling. But this model is available at a price level similar today of the previous GX7 which was a very successful model in the recent past. For a reason of my now I have not found that the Lumix GX9 is such a strong departure from the GX85 but you have to consider its improved image sensor (20MP vs 16MP) but other than that the two models are similar in many ways. Finally I have noticed that since a few months there is a kind of Panasonic Lumix GX9 renaissance partly du of the very early negative reviews which is funny and demonstrate the lack of distanciation of the more instant reviewers. Like they said: "Moderation have always better taste" Publié par Daniel M à 09:53 Envoyer ce message par courrielBlogThis!Partager sur TwitterPartager sur FacebookPartager sur Pinterest Libellés : Panasonic, Panasonic Lumix GX9
  6. I must confess that I was not thrill at all with the advanced announcement of the Nikon and Canon mirrorless 35mm digital cameras-lenses systems. I had a strong concern about the will of these manufacturers to offer real compact mirrorless system. And I was not the only one with that fear of incomprehension from them to the very basis concept regarding mirrorless design. Now that we are looking at Nikon and Canon answers to an anticipated decline of their customer bases it is not surprising that they simply import the D-SLR bias into theirs new model proposals. Big, somewhat already outdated and by far expensive photo devices couple with with very traditional bazooka lenses. Is this innovation? Certainly not. Is this photo equipment interesting alternative for passionate photographers who like now to travel and shoot lightly and be less intimidating for their subjects? For sure not! So it is a profound disappointment for many of us who like photography as a visual expression of the everyday life. And so I must salute the courage of those other manufacturers who seem to be maintain the stand of compactness of mirrorless system like Olympus, Panasonic and Fujifilm. For Nikon and Canon all hopes seem to vanish in their D-SLR profit reassignment...
  7. Regarding the future of MFT I agree with both of your points of view, Dallas and Luc, compactness and softer price level may preserve and extend their market.
  8. From a technical point of view I think it can be manageable in the near future ( 3-5 years may be) but on the commercial front the question will be for the manufacturers: is there a sufficient market to sustain that effort? And the price point level is the other key required for success in that matter...
  9. danielm

    40-150mm f/2.8 PRO M.Zuiko

    "Mine is smaller than yours!" You will rarely say this as an advantage especially from the macho male photographer point of view. But in the case of the Olympus M. Zuiko 40-150mm F2.8 PRO the story can be true considering the extended versatility and the reduce size of this model compare to the DSLR counterparts. Furthermore the same statement can be proclaimed for all the M4/3 format equipment. For sure there is still a strong resistance to the introduction of the M4/3 format from the so-call professional intelligentsia (?). The picture quality argument has been served ad nauseam to reject the compact option. But time is passing by and moreover people are changing. The new state regarding photography and its popularity is intimacy related to its fast and versatile connection ability. Big DSLR dont seem to follow that path so extinction is not far away for them (Shame on me!!!). The Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 PRO stays a massive lens by M4/3 compact standards. But it replace two DSLR Pro lenses, the traditional 70-200mm and 300mm both with maximum aperture of F2.8. So the trade-off is still at the advantage of the Olympus Pro telephoto zoom lens model. It prevent also the necessity of changing lenses or to operate two different cameras. Using big telephoto zoom lenses increase the unbalance tendency between the optic and the camera. That fact can be critical if you need a correct handling especially if you are panning the action not only for the effect but simply to follow the subject. Fatigue can be a highly distractive factor that will affect your ability and motivation to produce pictures. You can enhance your handling by adding an additional grip or vertical power grip on the camera. If you adopt a more static position a fix support like a monopod or a tripod will be a great help for stabilisation and a more careful picture cropping. In fact the nature of your subject will characterize your working methodology. With such a Pro lens model with a larger maximum aperture of F2.8 the photograph will select most of the time a fairly large opening between F2.8 and 5.6. Those aperture opening will narrowed the deep-of-field and privilege the main subject. Focus can be critical at that point and autofocus or prefocus have to be set carefully. Your picture waste will also increase accordingly. That is part of the experiment. If you are a more stereotype photograph like the photojournalists you may prefer to work with DSLR equipment. I am always impressed to see those boxes full of photojournalists with identical equipment in major sports events. They only reproduce the same picture without any search of originality. This is another specie of photographs in danger of obsolescence. As a Pro lens the Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 is getting a superior quality of construction. The zoom and focusing rings are larger and will turn nicely with a simulated friction similar to old-fashioned lenses. The click-on manual option available on the focus ring is a very secure and fast way of selecting between auto or manual possibilities. By selecting the manual focusing only position you over rule the autofocus fonction and get a better focusing ring resistance similar to the previous manual focusing lenses. It replicate what is already present to the Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 Pro lens which is often the companion optic chosen by many. As for all the Olympus other M4/3lenses, no aperture ring are offer on that model assuming that it will done by one of the dials of the camera. The monumental push-pull lens hood is included with the Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 Pro. Operating the mechanism may require some study and practices from your part. I have worked freely with or without the lens hood (if it was possible to do so without compromising my picture quality). The Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 Pro is also doted of an already tripod/monopod accessory mount that can be rotate for horizontal or vertical shooting. The making of this piece appears to be very well designed and constructed. My suggestion is to kept it permanently on the lens and simply rotate it aside when you are handholding it alone. The Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 Pro lens got the weather protection which qualify the optic for an extended use in most adverse conditions. It allows you also to fully clean the lens. Contrary of the usual mystic regarding the use of those big Pro lenses these optics are not fast handling device. They will require from the photograph an effort in preparation and during their specific manipulation. Shooting at will may expose you to some disappointment in view of the final results. With try and experience you will mastermind the care and the limit of these pro telephoto lenses such as the Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 Pro. In-board camera stabilization may partially help you but the fundamentals stay the same such as selecting a higher shutter speed and panning your subject. If possible an external support such as a monopod or a tripod can help you a lot (and prevent fatigue!). The Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 Pro can be a very fine portrait lens and many beautiful examples presented over the Web illustrate that fact. It can be also an interesting "abstraction" lens that allows many defocusing experimentations. Working with relatives short distances (for this type of lenses) will narrow the deep-of-field for bokey effect. Sport and nature photography appear to be the most spontaneous themes of preference for what the Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 Pro has been first designed et manufactured. And many users have already demonstrate the rightful of this perception. As I have already said at the beginning of this post, this telephoto zoom pro lens is in fact more versatile into a smaller package. In many ways it respond to the standards imposed in almost any photojournalistic situations. But it is not part of the Canon-Nikon 24X36mm sensor format media cartel as an Olympus M4/3 product. In my sense it a shame but it proves the stalemate of evolution of many so-call themselves "professional photographers"and extinction is not far ahead. Finally here is a short note regarding the high selling prices of many of those "pro" lenses. Usually these professional intended optics are produced in smaller quantity with higher cost material and for a limited distribution. Therefore their price tags are positioned at a selling point difficult to reach for many of us (including obviously myself!). But if you consider the added durability of these models and their constant value over time, you will often discover that they simply follow the inflation rate over the years and the decades. It is up to you to invest yourself in that kind of heavy expense. The Olympus M. Zuiko 40-150mm F2.8 Pro lens is a very fine, constant, versatile, workhorse optic that is reliable into various conditions of uses. It is part of the traditional duo along with the Olympus M. Zuiko 12-40mm F2.8 Pro and also with the T(h)ree family if combined with the Olympus 7-14mm Pro. All these pro lenses will form a very competent equipment when teamed with OM-D bodies like the E-M1 and E-M5 or even the E-M10 (Original or Mark II versions of any of those models). A complete Pro system Olympus is very serious about its Pro line of lenses involvement and offer a complete line-up of fine, fast and sturdy optics with the M. Zuiko 7-14mm F2.8, 12-40mm F2.8, 12-100mm F4.0 IS, 40-150mm f2.8, Fisheye 8mm F1.8, 25mm F1.2 and 300mm F4.0 IS. Combined with the OM-D E-M1 (original or Mark II), an independent professional photographer will find a very competent and compact eco-system that will sustain most of its need.
  10. danielm

    25mm f/1.8 M.Zuiko

    The Holy Classical Lens: The Olympus M. Zuiko 25mm F1.8 During the so-call 35mm film era we use to call it the "normal" lens. The one optic that came almost the facto with any camera model ... and the most economical one too! If you are looking through it (via you viewfinder) it respect roughly our eye sight for the proportion of the subject. So it was and still is a very previsible lens. Parts of the Olympus fine lens line-up there are two versions of this normal lens: the M. Zuiko 25mm F1.8 and the Pro 25mm F1.2 the latter has been introduced lately. Their angle of view are similar (47 degrees for the F1.8 version) but the big differences are mainly their specific construction and their respective maximum aperture available. If you are planning to use your 25mm very extendedly in adverse external condition or for many studio mandates it can be wise to privilege the F1.2 Pro version. But for a more casual use the basic F1.8 will do the job without any losing quality expense. This is the version that I will briefly review. Legendary Belgian World Champion Eddy Merckx at the finish line of the 1974 Montreal World Cycling Championships. This shot was done only with anticipation and has succeeded ! ( Photo Daniel Marchand) A "normal" lens on sports assignment !!! Typical 1974 Photo Press Release of the photo finish lane ( Picture source from Cycling Week Web site ) Memories: Some years ago (let say few decades) my first 35mm SLR camera (a modest Argus Cosina STL1000) was coupled with the economical standard Cosinon 50mm F1.7 lens, a package available for 249 $CAN which was a lot of money from a yesterday point of view. And I remember "covering" the World Cycling Championship in Montreal in 1974 with a few black & white rolls of film and this minimal combination of camera and lens. The results of that improvised assignment had just convinced me to poursuit my photographic dream of a career which finally happened about ten years after. And that story along many others is proving the great versatility of a so-call normal focal fixed lens such as the 25mm in M4/3 format. Other photo extracts of that day of the 1974 Montreal World Cycling Championship. ( Photos Daniel Marchand) (Let's return to our regular program...) Physically the Olympus M.Zuiko 25mm F1.8 is a small package considering its relatively large maximum aperture. This compact design will match nicely the camera dimensions of most M4/3 format models. A large focus ring is surrounding the 25mm which is a strong permanent tentation to select manually by yourself your focus point. It is really a creative prime lens, an academic optic as should add the traditional photographic teachers. A polymer made lens hood is part of the accessories included with the lens. It is a nice addition offer with a none too much perturbing size. And it is bayonet mounted and very easy to put in or pull out. With an angle of view of 47 degrees the Olympus 25mm F1.8 is a very confortable optic to work with. All perspective aspects of the image respect your own view of the subject. By moving yourself you can control the cropping of your picture without surprise. So it is really a pro-active tool in that sens. No subject is out of the reach of the Olympus 25mm although it can ask to reframe in some cases when you finally edit your picture for diffusion. Very close focus subjects can be photograph with this "normal" lens. As for subjects with minimal deep of field study. And you can do portrait assuming that there is always the possibility to crop afterward the picture. The Olympus M. 25mm F1.8 is a fine lens. The quality output of its picture results is high for its modest price compare to "pro" counterpart such as the Olympus Pro M.Zuiko 25mm f1.2 optic. Most of the time I have selected the largest apertures available ranging from F1.8 to F5.6 without suffering any lost of definition. Moreover I suspect that the lens has been primarily designed to be used within that range of apertures. Focus final selection can be easily performed by configuring the camera with the option allowing the combination of auto-manual focusing. The more you will explore your subject with it the more you will learn to appreciate its abilities. Is the 25mm lens can be assimilated as a "one and only" lens to bring option? May be depending what type of photographer you are. For sure for contextual street photography into urban area its angle of view can be perceive a bit too much narrowed compare with the Olympus 17mm f1.8 for example. But remember that guys like Henri Cartier-Bresson have done very fine and emblematic pictures with that angle of view (translated by the 50mm focal length in 24X36mm film format). Finally if your are more oriented "zoomer" photographer by choice or by necessity, the Olympus 25mm F1.8 is a nice back-up lens for on-the-spot replacement and its useful maximum aperture in low light conditions or even for its smaller less intrusive size and it can be slip in your pocket. Yes the Olympus M.Zuiko 25mm F1.8 is another affordable gem part of the nice Olympus M.Zuiko line-up.
  11. danielm

    60mm f/2.8 ED Macro M.Zuiko

    The Olympus M.Zuiko ED 60mm F2.8 Macro: Doing more than macro in M4/3 format. It may be the most curious looking lens of the entire Olympus optical line up for M4/3 format camera. Strange may be also another epitheth to describe it. Its physical aspect with its non-obvious function dials are giving to the Olympus M.Zuiko ED 60mm F2.8 Macro lens a more confidential reputation based for a good part to its specialized first task intended i.e. macrophotography. Close focusing photography has been always of a great interest for me as for many of us. Subjects in that field are infinite with various points of view. On a purely documentary side doing macro photography was at first on the scientific priority but very early on following the first spreading of the new medium we have seen beautiful artistic black and white and later on colourful macrophotographic pictures. We may qualify them as the prelude of abstract photography. Although many fine lenses designed for more general purpose can produce very fine close focusing pictures camera and lens manufacturers had soon beging to offer specific macro lenses calculated mostly to cope the flat field exigence of reproduction purpose. That trend has been observed throughout the technical evolution of the photographic equipment. Today macro lenses are current part of many photo arsenal of photographers around the world. Into the M4/3 format lenses you can rely on different models part of the Olympus and Panasonic line-up. All of them are exceptional contenders of their own. Normal focal ones such as the 30mm length are more suited to be versatile as macro and everyday lenses. Long focal counterparts such as 45mm and 60mm may represent a more powerful alternative for doing very small and near object or better tool for studio and reproduction works. The Olympus M.Zuiko ED 60mm F2.8 Macro represent a very interesting lens with close focusing ability at first and unprecedented characteristics such as its longer focal length and its all-weather construction. With an angle of view of 20 degrees it surpass many short telephoto for portrait work. Even with a maximum aperture of F2.8 it can be use for action photography in normal daylight condition. Of course close focusing can be its primary advantage combined by the fact that its longer focal length prevent most of its potential obstruction of light on the close subject. Maybe the most spectacular part of the Olympus 60mm Macro is its oddly aspect if you compare it with others lens designs. But in the past many macro lenses had and still have that kind of visual aspect. I have to concede that it is not the most discrete optic I have ever used. As for most telephoto macro lenses the Olympus M.Zuiko ED 60mm F2.8 Macro is a very creative tool and versatile because of its close focusing ability. If you accept the fix focal length factor you will find many ways to produce very original pictures that emphasize your main subject. As usual telephoto lenses can be also very competent for doing landscape or urbanscape photography with their dramatizing compression of many subjects in one frame. The Olympus M.Zuiko 60mm F2.8 Macro lens is a small optic which is part a the traditional M4/3 format line of prime lenses. With a focal length of 60mm it is magnification factor of 2.4X compare to a standard lens (25mm) with an angle of view of 20 degrees which is qualified the optic for portrait or for small telephoto work. At 185g it is also a very light package easy to bring with you as an extra lens but you have to pay more attention to your stability in use since it is not possible to count on its own weight inertia (like bigger telephoto counterparts), In that case the camera stabilisation option is a welcome feature. Manual focusing can be performed nicely through its large and very smooth focusing ring. Using the 60mm with the OM-D E-M5 II and its EVF (Electronic ViewFinder) is easy and the image is clear and accurate in most photographic situations. Focusing speed is surprisely responsive for this type of (macro) optic and it qualify the 60mm Macro lens for all other subjects associated with the use of a medium telephoto. And yes the use of the limiter dial can save you time (and picture opportunities!) if it is applied in the good working context. The reproduction ratio scale is an amusing gadget also. Typical third-party screw-in (46mm) metal lens hood for telephoto. (Always check for trace of vignetting) There is always that annoying discussion about the utility of using a lens hood with the 60mm since Olympus does not provide one with the lens (which is also very annoying...) My answer is simple: if you can afford to buy and bring one dont prevent yourself to do so. I have found the Olympus official lens hood to be a clever design (like the one that came right from the box for the Olympus M.Zuiko 40-150mm F.2.8 Pro model !) but you may consider some third party options less pricy and less bulky available through the Web. Essentially lens hoods are preventing some lens internal reflections (flare) especially when you are pointing in direction of punctual light sources. The Olympus M.Zuiko ED 60mm F2.8 Macro is a very fine lens as it is intended to be. We are reaching pro level image results. Picture are crisp and rightly detailed. Colours are accurate and follow the Olympus expected bias without any adaptation compare to the other lenses of the Olympus line up. Out of focus areas are pleasant even considering the moderate maximum aperture of the lens. The macro ability of this 60mm is flawless and enhanced by the longer focal length that reduce the risk of interfering with the subject light. In bref it is fair to consider the Olympus M.Zuiko ED 60mm F2.8 Macro lens as an all-around medium telephoto optic with very handy macro possibilities but also nice other abilities such as for spontaneous photography, portrait or even action subject.
  12. Yes Luc I fully understand your (image richness) nostalgia. For some others it is also the better flexibility of the 35mm deep of field or the enhanced enlargement (or cropping) capability. Can a manufacturer able to design a compact 35mm digital camera model with interchangeable small lenses in the near future? If so you can bet that many of us will look at it very seriously.
  13. As Dallas has already mentioned the Lumix GM1 is a very small but competent package. I have used the GM5 for a nice trip in Greece about three years ago with good results and I have really appreciated its diminutive size. The tiny (and contrasty) viewfinder can be a good help if you are in a situation of strong back sunshine. For a better EVF your choice can migrate to the GX85(80) or the newest GX9.
  14. Hi Armando, For travelling I have always preferred to carry less intrusive rangefinder style cameras with pancake lenses. My best combo during the latest years has been a Panasonic Lumix GX85 with the diminutive G Vario 12-32mm OIS (completed with the G Vario 35-100mm F4-5.6 OIS in my pocket). But I am sure that any other camera model of the same nature can do perfectly the job. On a more funnier note "rangefinder" style cameras always appears to be very touristic photo devices!
  15. danielm

    27mm f/2.8 XF Fujinon

    Today a personal choice would be probably to pair the Fujinon 23mm f2 lens with a Fujifilm X-E3 (regardless of the price point). The add-on possibility to interchange between lenses is giving space for a more specialized optic like a small telephoto or a macro lens. But like I said it is purely a personal view.
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