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Showing content with the highest reputation since 26/04/12 in MFT Lenses

  1. 1 point
    Another "non-technical review." Yes, the zoom range is fantastic. But if you start enlarging the images, I find they are not particularly sharp. I am talking about landscape shots. I have not done any macro shots with this yet. Frankly, had I spent more time with the lens after purchasing, I think I would have sent this one back. Perhaps I got a "dud?"
  2. 1 point
    This is the best lens I've ever used. I call it my "bag of primes." It is incredibly sharp, not just among zooms. And of course, it is as fast as many prime lenses. Downside is the size and weight, but hey, it's ƒ2! Of course it's big and heavy! It is still smaller and lighter than full frame zooms of similar reach that are a full stop slower! I think this is the ultimate "event lens." I used it to shoot a three-day conference recently, and it performed wonderfully, both in classrooms, and in a dimly-lit, 1,000 seat auditorium, with the help of the EC-14 teleconverter. It should also work well for weddings, portraits, and photojournalism. Positives: Incredibly, almost painfully sharp, at all focal lengths and all apertures, from edge-to-edge, from infinity to closest focus. One prominent review site said it was the best zoom lens of any kind from any manufacture that they had ever tested. Amazing fast ƒ2 maximum aperture, at all focal lengths. Very nearly as good with the EC-14 teleconverter, as a 49-141mm ƒ2.8 lens. Great bokeh and subject isolation when used wide open. Extremely accurate and reasonably fast auto-focus, at least on the OM-D E-M1 Mark II. It was a $3k lens at one point, but can be had used for well under US $1,000 these days. Can be used with the EX-25 extension tube for close manual focusing. Excellent build quality. Negatives: Big and heavy! Lacks close focusing. Focus is slow on non-PDAF bodies, which I think is all but the Olympus OM-D E-M1, and its Mark II sibling. No auto-focus with the EX-25 extension tube. Focus changes with zoom, so limited use for video.
  3. 1 point
    Panasonic Lumix G 20mm F1.7 (II): The fair lens with or without flare! One of the nicest focal fixed lenses produced by the Panasonic Compact System is the Lumix G 20mm F1.7 referred as « Pancake » by many users. Although it is not part of the usual kit proposed for the Panasonic m4/3 cameras like many standard zoom lens such as the 14-42mm the Lumix 20mm F1.7 has been combined with the Lumix GX7 for example as a standard lens. Everybody knows that the picture quality results are most of the time better if you select a focal fixed lens. This Panasonic lens is no exception and you should appreciate the picture outputs obtained. The Lumix 20mm F1.7 is compact, well built and has a very smooth manual focusing ring effect. The color rendition of the lens is respecting the Panasonic own bias of the others lens models of the series (Thanks possibly to the in-board camera image post treatment). Foreground/Background In-Out Focus The angle of view of the Panasonic Lumix G 20mm F1.7 is similar to the one you got for your own vision if you concentrate on the detailed part (in focus) area. So it is a very predictable lens that will allow you to anticipate your composition without constantly using to the viewfinder or the screen of the camera. Typical Lens Flare I have read from one respected reviewer that the lens is very sensitive to lens flare phenomena when it is exposed to direct source of light like the sun. Every lenses will present some kind of lens flare over different contexts and because of the very compact (flat) optical design of the Lumix G 20mm F1.7 it is a normal to get lens flare. Since I am somewhat more experimented with optical physic I recommend using your hand as a “flag” (like we use to do during studio photo sessions) to counteract this effect. A good lens hood will give you the same service for most of the time. No more lens flare by using your hand as a flag. At the end and considering the photographic value of the Panasonic Lumix G 20mm F1.7 it is really a good opportunity at a small sales price to get access to a very good photographic tool. A great street lens!
  4. 1 point
    Panasonic Lumix G 25mm F1.7 ASPH. There was a time when the "normal" taking lens that was de facto coupled on most cameras. Only its focal length could vary in harmony with the film format. Its visual field angle roughly corresponds to our area of sharpness when we observe a scene in the eye. From the outset I must admit that I am certainly not a big fan of so-called "normal" lenses. Imposed by tradition and economic reasons I have always experienced a number of frustrations related mainly to their narrowed visual field of view. However, I must admit that these lenses are also very versatile optical tools despite their fixed focal length. And in fact we can say that all normal lenses are probably the best way to approach traditional photography. They make school and require the photographer a creative effort in his shooting. A beautiful selectivity with short distance subject. The Panasonic Lumix G 25mm F1.7 ASPH is a bargain in every way. Its very low price makes it accessible for any user who wants to explore the world of fixed focal length lenses. Its maximum aperture of F1.7 is in the right average to allow some control of the area of sharpness of the subject via the phenomenon of depth of field. It is lightweight, discreet and its enlarged focus ring is convenient. Its dedicated sunshade is included with its purchase, a healthy commercial habit from Panasonic. With a 46mm filter-accessory diameter, further accessory investment for this everyday optics remains minimal. For whom this little "normal" of the Panasonic Lumix G is ranging for? At first, certainly to the enthusiasm's one of traditional photography. By excluding current aids trans-standard lenses such as the focal length variable or the integrated optical stabilization, the Panasonic Lumix G 25mm F1.7 ASPH. push the photographer to learn and master the major parameters of composition, exposure (sensor) and more selective focus (depth of field). In addition, its discretion due to its low volume makes the camera-lens combination less intimidating for the main subject of the image, especially if one chooses an off-center viewfinder style rangefinder. Moreover this 25mm F1.7 enjoys an extended flexibility on the choice of subjects, compositions, styles of photography as long as the user shows a minimum mobility. One of the features I really enjoyed about the Panasonic Lumix G 25mm F1.7 ASPH. is its great ease of involvement in all circumstances but more specifically in low light situation and for a subject at very short distance. The increased reactivity induced on the camera used is remarkable and may be the consequence of the combination of a fixed focal length and a greater maximum aperture of the lens compared to the usual trans-standard and telephoto zoom lenses. The quality of the resulting images of the Lumix G 25mm F1.7 ASPH. is in the good average for an MFT format. The maximum aperture of F1.7 is surely not a handicap and can be used freely for a better control of the sharpness zone of the main subject of the image. Panasonic offers the other Leica DG Summilux 25mm F1.4 ASPH model which has the marginal advantage of greater maximum aperture in a similar size-weight but with a price multiplied by three! The Panasonic Lumix G 25mm F1.7 ASPH. is a very discreet optic that s fine aesthetically and mechanically. It harmonizes well with the spirit of Panasonic's other MFT products which favors sobriety in efficiency. Given its reduced price and its versatility it can be an easy addition and appreciated in a photographic set.
  5. 1 point
    Dallas' Overview This is a great little lens! I used this extensively on my 2013 safari to Namibia and I got some awesome landscape photos with it in a variety of situations. The biggest strength of this lens is the fact that it is so small. It weighs next to nothing and is collapsible, so it takes up very little space in a bag. You have to purchase the hood separately and its one of those square types that isn't reversible on the lens, however, because it's so shallow this isn't always a problem. I find it very sharp and contrasty throughout the range. I highly recommend getting one if wide angles are your thing. However since I obtained this lens there have been a couple of alternative ultra wide angle zoom lenses that have emerged from both Panasonic and Olympus which out perform it. For interiors and architectural work there is a significant amount of barrel distortion which isn't automatically corrected when using the built-in profile in Lightroom. I still have to apply a manual distortion correction of +12 to get lines on the edge straight (Lightroom).
  6. 1 point
    As can be read in specs above this is a small lens. OK, let's make that tiny. Like it's little brother 12-32mm f3.5-5.6 this lens was primarily designed for the smallest Panasonic MicroFourThirds cameras GM1 and GM5. A GM1 with both lenses (spanning a very useful 24-200mm range) weighs just 484 grams. I'm a fan of Panasonic lens design since the days of the "serious compact" LX3. That camera had a fantastic Leica branded 24-60mm f2-2.8 lens. The 35-100mm lens is very good lens optically. CA is virtually non-existent. No need to stop this one down unless you want to control dof. Center is sharp from wide open and the borders are almost at center level sharpness. This is not an expensive premium lens, in fact it can be bought cheaply on eBay as a lot of GM1/GM5 sets were taken apart to sell the items separately. I bought mine from a Hong Kong seller for just € 139. Lens design and coatings are obviously not on premium level but with care during exposure and processing this lens is capable of producing quality images. The lack of micro-contrast is something that shows this lens limitations. On critical images I add contrast and sharpen with Nik Output Sharpener as this does a better job than Lightroom. A full set of 35-100mm images can be viewed on my Flickr account Panasonic 35-100mm f4-5.6 images
  7. 1 point
    As can be read in specs above this is a small lens. OK, let's make that tiny. Like it's bigger brother 35-100mm f4-5.6 this lens was primarily designed for the smallest Panasonic MicroFourThirds cameras GM1 and GM5. A GM1 with both lenses (spanning a very useful 24-200mm range) weighs just 484 grams. I'm a fan of Panasonic lens design since the days of the "serious compact" LX3. That camera had a fantastic Leica branded 24-60mm f2-2.8 lens. The 12-32mm lens is very good lens optically. CA is virtually non-existent. No need to stop this one down unless you want to control dof. Center is sharp from wide open and the borders are almost at center level sharpness. This is not an expensive premium lens, in fact it can be bought cheaply on eBay as a lot of GM1/GM5 sets were taken apart to sell the items separately. Lens design and coatings are obviously not on premium level but with care during exposure and processing this lens is capable of producing quality images. The lack of micro-contrast is something that shows this lens limitations. On critical images I add contrast and sharpen with Nik Output Sharpener as this does a better job than Lightroom. A full set of 12-32mm images can be viewed on my Flickr account Panasonic 12-32mm f3.5-5.6 images
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