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S & M


crowecg

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Sun and Moon - two photos from the last couple of days.

 

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Moon

 

This latest full moon represents the lunar new year.  It is also part of my personal challenge to get a shot combining a properly exposed moon within a non-black foreground.  I've got myself a calendar to plan the timing of these attempts (I get about 3 days a month).  It took a little bit of pulling the foreground out of the shadows, but it was just a single exposure.  Next time I just need a better foreground - my plan is for a city skyline.  My back yard is not quite big enough to get the moon and foreground well focused.  (Fuji X-E3 with 70-300)

 

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Sun

 

My 16 f/2.8 is usually well behaved with regard to flare, but the addition of an R72 filter probably provoked this.  Something about the shape of the flare seems to grab my attention with this.  It also matches nicely with the moon above by including a tree in the composition.  We've had a run of a few nice days with almost summer like temperatures which aren't normal for another month of two.  (unmodified Fuji X-E3 with 16 f/2.8 and R72 external filter) 

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Aside from the focal length (I’m cropping heavily from 300mm), the main challenge is exposure.  You need a daylight exposure for the moon (try sunny 16), but that will mostly just give you a moon in a black sky.  I’m working towards catching the moment as the sun is setting where there is still enough light to recover the foreground from the shadows without overexposuring the moon.   I believe it is possible, but also a lot of moon in landscapes pictures are actually composites, not a single exposure.

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That's the thing - two different exposures are needed, so compositing in Photoshop seems to be the answer. Or... you could just tell PS to generate a moon in any scene now and it will. 

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1 hour ago, Dallas said:

Or... you could just tell PS to generate a moon in any scene now and it will. 


Do that and I reckon the Internet Nerd responses would probably be instant and loud that the the moon wrongly orientated compared to what would be expected for the position on Earth that the background photo was taken in. Tycho is the dead giveaway, here it at right in one I took as it was positioned when viewed from 42°S in Southern Tasmania during 1-2 August's Super Moon event (Northern Hemisphere photos will have it on the opposite side):

lPEs0Kn.jpg

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...and adding to the above - you could probably do it in one shot if your camera has enough dynamic range - take a shot in broad daylight at the correct exposure, duplicate the image as another layer and up the contrast whilst adjusting the exposure to reveal the moon's details, then mask out the background in the upper layer to reveal the correctly exposed landscape and sky behind (it'll only probably work with a full moon, though, unless you wand to get into some really tricky retouching).

 

Here's a shot that was a washed out moon in a light blue sky in which I rammed up the contrast until that sky became black and the moon ended up looking like this:

1ontO3G.jpg

 

Edit: - it occurred to me the above is not much use without posting the daylight shot of the moon from which the above photo resulted:
BS2mzJZ.jpg

Edited by Alan7140
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On 03/10/2023 at 15:36, Dallas said:

Those are pretty impressive moon shots, Alan. I've never managed to get it properly exposed, or detailed enough. 


Full moon taken at night: Fujifilm X-T5 with Fujinon 100-400 lens @ 400mm and 1.4x TC fitted. Exposure: 1/250@f/8, 200 ISO.

Same setup for ¾ moon shot taken in daylight: Exposure 1/170 @ f/11 , ISO 200. 

 

Both are consistent with a lesson I remember from a university lecturer: a shot of the sunlit moon can be had, day or night, if exposed at around 1/125 sec @ f/11 on 125 ASA film (as it was back in the early '70's).

 

So nothing special about it, except that I'm based in rural Southern Tasmania (42.7°S), where the weather patterns flow from west to east, and there is virtually no human settlement further than 35km west of me (and even then that's just some farmland and a few small settlements of fewer than a hundred or so people each), next stop to the west and any source of pollution is the southern tip South America, so it's fair to say that outside the few cases of the nut-jobs at Forestry Tasmania burning off the trash their logging operations cause, we have just about the clearest air in the world here (that west-east flow of air misses South Africa's tip @ 34°S by a good distance).

 

All that in turn makes any celestial photography free from atmospheric distortion caused by air or light pollution, which helps things no end.

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  • 4 months later...

following the discussion up above about getting a shot with a properly exposed moon with a properly exposed foreground, I did get a chance while I was on holiday.  Unfortunately, I didn't have a long lens with me, so this is heavily cropped from the long end of my 18-55, but at least if confirms that it is possible.  Now just to update my calendar for the coming months and try and remember to have a longer lens with me when the right opportunity arises.

 

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Moon260 

 

Fujifilm X-E3 with 18-55.

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Whilst on the subject of the Moon, thanks to a bushfire burning in the Central Highlands of Tasmania filling the atmosphere with smoke, we got a pseudo Blood Moon a couple of nights ago.

 

 

_DSF4037-Bushfire-Moon.jpg

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