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Gwadloup Landscape Carnets


danielm

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16 hours ago, Dallas said:

That looks like a lovely place for a holiday. Thanks for sharing, Daniel. 

It is a kind of refuge from our never ending winter. Thanks for your appreciation, Dallas.

A trace of light that survive a little further than the actual moment of flash.

photodanielm.blogspot.com

Daniel M on Flickr

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Gwadloup Carnets: Church Presence
 
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It is always surprising how much the presence of the church (temple) if not its precedence in our Western society is still visible even knowing that the majority of people are no longer practicing (if in fact we tend to reserve this religious involvement for the most, should we say, "fanatics").
 

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In Guadeloupe, religious faith is part of the Caribbean cultural society which proves that human spiritual thought remains alive despite the apparent media (and Internet) secularism of today's communication exchanges.

Through all the natural disasters experienced by the Gwadloup Islands, their temple-churches have been preserved or rebuilt over time. In many cases they are interesting examples of the Art Deco style designed by the architect Ali Tur who took part in many reconstructions of civil buildings during the 1930s following the devastating cyclone of 1928. Here are some examples that you can see during a visit to Guadeloupe.

 
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Photos Daniel M: Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III / M.Zuiko 14-42mm II R

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A trace of light that survive a little further than the actual moment of flash.

photodanielm.blogspot.com

Daniel M on Flickr

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Gwadloup Carnets: The Sargassum Dilemma 

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You can smell thembefore seeing them deposited on the beaches of the Guadeloupe coast. They are present and they represent a kind of dissuasive tourist trap for those who seek the landscapes of the old postal beaches. They represent the modern tourist "threat" of Sargassum.

You can see them coming from the sea by observing gradually overgrown coastal areas and when fully settled they prevent an idealistic swimming practice in the clear ocean water. But many don't know that there is a Sargasso Sea (located loosely in the center of the Atlantic Ocean) that has been around for centuries, if not millennia. And no, its characteristic brown algae is in no way the result of a polluting activity but rather a very natural phenomenon. In fact, the Sargasso Sea has been and still is seriously polluted by plastic waste (a direct result of irresponsible human activities) of all kinds now present in the water.
 
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True, vacationers do not like the sight, the smell, the general discomfort caused by the additional presence of Sargassum. The same disgust applies to those who use motor boats because of the obvious inconvenience that brown algae can cause to propellers or turbines for example. Episodic phenomena surely obsess the greatest number more than the few who prefer to ignore it, but it is part of our geo-climatic reality that it would be almost impossible to prevent and control in the near future and is part of the life of our planet.

When the sargassum comes, isn't it time to take a break from our hectic lifestyle? The question remains there...
 

Photos Daniel M : Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III / M.Zuiko 12-42mm II R

 

 

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A trace of light that survive a little further than the actual moment of flash.

photodanielm.blogspot.com

Daniel M on Flickr

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Gwadloup Carnets: Seashore tourist watch 

 

 

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It's instinctive for most of us, let's say: looking at the sea! It's captivating, it's soothing, it's spiritual, etc., etc. It is also one of the last humble exercises that we as humans still consent to do. Perhaps because we understand that the sea cannot be mastered in the end by small creatures like us, even with all our pompous attempts to try it.

And the sea is an endless spectacular sight to watch and be a little scared of.

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Photos Daniel M: Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III / M.Zuiko 14-42mm II R

 
 

 

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A trace of light that survive a little further than the actual moment of flash.

photodanielm.blogspot.com

Daniel M on Flickr

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