Jump to content

First Impressions - Capture One 21


Recommended Posts

When I finally abandoned the long abandoned Apple Aperture as my main software, I decided I wasn't going to keep chasing the annual paid upgrades offered with Capture One.  However, recently they had an upgrade offer that effectively meant I could skip a version and upgrade from V.12 (2019) to v.21 - actually that is only two versions difference due to a change in their naming system at the start of this year when they jumped form V12 to v20.

 

Overall, there isn't any obvious stand out big changes that would justify a jump of just one version.  The main things I've noticed are thumbnails are much quicker on import (very much quicker actually) and there is a new dehaze filter.  Some reviews have also talked about a 'quick edit' feature but I haven't played with that yet.  

 

If I notice any other new features, I'll post an update, but perhaps the fact that so much of it looks and feels the same is actually a major benefit.  I think I'm starting to reach an age where constant software updates are annoying rather than exciting, especially when they change something that has worked fine for a long time.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
  • Replies 5
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • crowecg

    3

  • Dallas

    2

  • Anthony

    1

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I have had an official email from C1 confirming this. I will not be upgrading from V20 as the improvements are minimal and the cost excessive. C1's pricing policies are being heavily criticised on var

crowecg

Various outlets warn of an impending price increase, so if you are still thinking or buying or upgrading, don’t wait too long.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Anthony
12 hours ago, crowecg said:

Various outlets warn of an impending price increase, so if you are still thinking or buying or upgrading, don’t wait too long.

 

I have had an official email from C1 confirming this. I will not be upgrading from V20 as the improvements are minimal and the cost excessive. C1's pricing policies are being heavily criticised on various photography forums.

 

With the increase, the annual cost of upgrading will be £199. My LR and PS subscription cost £120, by way of comparison.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
crowecg
14 hours ago, Dallas said:

To be honest, I am growing terribly tired of the software treadmill. 

 

Is the 12 month upgrade cycle of software (and a lot of hardware) really any different to a subscription?

 

I'm not sure whether it is just me getting old or just the ever increasing frequency of updates, but the idea of updating everything is loosing the excitement that it used to have.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Administrators
Dallas
3 hours ago, crowecg said:

 

Is the 12 month upgrade cycle of software (and a lot of hardware) really any different to a subscription?

 

I'm not sure whether it is just me getting old or just the ever increasing frequency of updates, but the idea of updating everything is loosing the excitement that it used to have.

 

What I find is that software developers are now in the business of creating digital dependance. About 10 years ago all we were looking for was a solution to a given problem. Now it seems we are being supplied problems to given solutions. Every time I do an upgrade something that was working fine before either stops working or works unreliably. I've had enough of it. 

 

I have also decided that I am not going to rescue my Whatsapp account when they delete it on 8 February. The new T&C's from Zuckerface are preposterous and I refuse to yield to them. Encouraging all my friends and family to get an alternative, such as Viber or whatever else does the same thing. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Similar Content

    • Walter Rowe
      By Walter Rowe
      Where I live I experience all the traffic of the Washington DC suburbs and the typical stress of large city commuting. I do my best to avoid it by traveling the back roads. Most commuters don’t see scenes like this because they drive the major thoroughfares, always in a rush to get to where they are going. I prefer taking my time and “smelling the roses along the way”. I think this proves it is worth the extra time. What do you think?
       
      This was taken with my Nikon Z7 + Nikkor Z 24-70/4S + a circular polarizer lens. I processed the image in Capture One Pro 12.
       

    • Walter Rowe
      By Walter Rowe
      For those interested in migrating Apple Aperture libraries to Capture One I created this video that illustrates the process and details what metadata and organizational structure is migrated into Capture One. Here are some notes I made while testing this process over and over again in preparation to make the video.
       
      What Aperture Library information is imported into the Capture One Catalog
      Image files are imported into Capture One by reference Aperture Color Labels import correctly to Capture One Color Labels AA Color Labels – red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, gray CO Color Labels – red, orange, yellow, green, blue, pink, purple NOTE: AA purple translates to CO pink, AA gray translates to CO purple AA Duplicate Versions become CO Variants All keywords and IPTC metadata come over (flattened due to an Aperture deficiency) All ratings come over  
      What Aperture Library information is NOT imported into the Capture One Catalog
      Flags – suggest filtering for flagged images in AA and add special keyword Custom Metadata – Move custom metadata field information to standard IPTC fields Keyword Structure – Aperture keyword field does support nested keywords Image Stacks – Capture One only stacks variants of the same image (Versions) – I recommend making an album of each stack if you want to preserve it. Aperture albums are imported as Capture One albums. Books, Slideshows, Light Tables, Web Journals, Web Pages  
      Organization of Aperture Libraries vs Capture One User Collections
      CO creates a top level Group (Folder) with the name of the AA Library that was imported All AA organization structure is imported and placed within this top level CO Group Aperture Projects become Capture One Projects Aperture Folders become Capture One Groups (Folders) Aperture Albums become Capture One Albums Aperture nested Folders become Capture One nested Groups CO creates an Album in each imported Project containing all images from corresponding AA Project  
      How do Aperture and Capture One Differ
      Aperture associates images with Projects Capture One associates images with Albums Aperture Versions can reside in different Albums Capture One Variants are kept together in all Albums AA Stacks are not retained in CO does not have an equivalent CO Stacks can only stack all of the variants of a single image Selecting a Folder in Aperture WILL display all the images it contains Selecting a Group in Capture One will NOT display all the images it contains  
      How are Aperture and Capture One Similar
      Selecting a Project displays all the images in all the Albums it contains Capture One Projects cannot contain other Projects Changing Inspector / Tool Tab panels does NOT change browser/viewer  
      Full Disclosure: I am a Capture One affiliate. I earn a small referral fee if you use my affiliate link to purchase subscriptions, licenses, style packs and bundles.
       
       

      View full article
    • Walter Rowe
      By Walter Rowe
      For those interested in migrating Apple Aperture libraries to Capture One I created this video that illustrates the process and details what metadata and organizational structure is migrated into Capture One. Here are some notes I made while testing this process over and over again in preparation to make the video.
       
      What Aperture Library information is imported into the Capture One Catalog
      Image files are imported into Capture One by reference Aperture Color Labels import correctly to Capture One Color Labels AA Color Labels – red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, gray CO Color Labels – red, orange, yellow, green, blue, pink, purple NOTE: AA purple translates to CO pink, AA gray translates to CO purple AA Duplicate Versions become CO Variants All keywords and IPTC metadata come over (flattened due to an Aperture deficiency) All ratings come over  
      What Aperture Library information is NOT imported into the Capture One Catalog
      Flags – suggest filtering for flagged images in AA and add special keyword Custom Metadata – Move custom metadata field information to standard IPTC fields Keyword Structure – Aperture keyword field does support nested keywords Image Stacks – Capture One only stacks variants of the same image (Versions) – I recommend making an album of each stack if you want to preserve it. Aperture albums are imported as Capture One albums. Books, Slideshows, Light Tables, Web Journals, Web Pages  
      Organization of Aperture Libraries vs Capture One User Collections
      CO creates a top level Group (Folder) with the name of the AA Library that was imported All AA organization structure is imported and placed within this top level CO Group Aperture Projects become Capture One Projects Aperture Folders become Capture One Groups (Folders) Aperture Albums become Capture One Albums Aperture nested Folders become Capture One nested Groups CO creates an Album in each imported Project containing all images from corresponding AA Project  
      How do Aperture and Capture One Differ
      Aperture associates images with Projects Capture One associates images with Albums Aperture Versions can reside in different Albums Capture One Variants are kept together in all Albums AA Stacks are not retained in CO does not have an equivalent CO Stacks can only stack all of the variants of a single image Selecting a Folder in Aperture WILL display all the images it contains Selecting a Group in Capture One will NOT display all the images it contains  
      How are Aperture and Capture One Similar
      Selecting a Project displays all the images in all the Albums it contains Capture One Projects cannot contain other Projects Changing Inspector / Tool Tab panels does NOT change browser/viewer  
      Full Disclosure: I am a Capture One affiliate. I earn a small referral fee if you use my affiliate link to purchase subscriptions, licenses, style packs and bundles.
       
       
    • Dallas
      By Dallas
      Quite a few years ago I reviewed the original Alien Skin Exposure Photoshop plugin for Nikongear.com. It was probably one of the first reviews I ever wrote. I used Exposure film simulations in almost every bit of processing I did back then to the point where it was almost like it become an extension of my editing signature. I was especially fond of the Velvia and Kodachrome 64, as well as the Konica 750 IR and Ilford B&W film simulations.
      Over the years I stopped using Photoshop and with it went my extensive use of Exposure. Somehow it stayed off my radar until just the other day when I saw on my Facebook Photography List that they have now released Exposure 5 which also operates as a stand alone program. I thought I would give it a try.
      You know that song from the Rocky Horror? The one where they all stand around with their hands on their hips, doing pelvic thrusts and jumping to the left? Yeah, they called it the "Time Warp". Well, there should be a warning label on this software to let users know that they may just find themselves going through the time warp once they start playing with it. Let me explain.
      There are so many film simulations and other customisable bits to this piece of software that if you're not careful you'll find yourself totally losing all track of time. I opened up an image at lunchtime on my first day of trying it out and before I knew it dinner time had arrived and I was nowhere near done with checking out all the cool things I could do to this very mundane image of mine.
      There are not only a myriad of film simulations available, but now you can also customise them in terms of the amount of grain you want on them, the size of the grain, whether you want to push the process by up to three stops, the roughness of the grain, the amounts of it there are in the shadows, mid-tones and highlights and even its relative size to the film format you're simulating.
      If that's not enough to send you off into a form of semi-lucid wonder there are also customisable settings for the tone curve, focus (think sharpening settings), colour, Infra-Red, vignettes and borders & textures to play with. You can save any of your settings under these parameters as a preset too. That's just in case you don't find the ones Alien Skin have already loaded for you to be enough. The borders and textures are pretty funky, but I suspect they are only there for those people who like to make art out of what would normally be rejected images. They certainly do lend an air of credibility to some of my less inspired moments behind the viewfinder.
      OK, with that said, let me walk you through some of the features and the interface.
      User Interface

      click to enlarge
      If you're a Lightroom user you're going to recognise the interface immediately. It looks and (almost) behaves exactly as Lightroom does. There's a couple of collapsible panels on either side of the screen. The one on the left shows you a whole bunch of presets together with a small preview of what you can expect them to do to your image.
      This is actually a very cool way of doing things because there is also a search box in there, so if you want to find any of the presets that emulate Ilford, just type it in and they will appear in the panel. You can also set up the preset panel to show two or three columns of previews, which is great if you are working on a small screen. I have this installed on my 13" MacBook, so when I am away from the 27" extended monitor things get a bit tiny. Nice touch from Alien Skin.
      On the right side of the screen is the Time Warp panel. OK, sorry, let's call it the "Customisation Panel" just in case it scares those of you with attention deficit issues off. This panel has a Navigator window with a little square you can drag around to focus on any part of the image if your view is zoomed in a bit. Speaking of zoomed in views, you can choose from a myriad of different presets for the zoom level as there isn't a slider for setting that.
      Just below the Navigator you will see a slider for "Overall Intensity". What this does is exactly what it says, but it doesn't affect only one of the customisations, it affects them all. You can adjust the intensity of any of the individual customisations from within their own interface panels.
      The customisations you can play with are as follows:
      Colour
      There's a lot of sliders and stuff in here that look kind of intimidating to me. Things like Density, Luminosity, Colour Sensitivity, etc, etc... There are also presets in here and you can save your own settings as a new preset if you're not as daunted as I am when it comes to messing around with colour.
      Tone Curve
      This is something I am not that afraid to play with and the interface will be quite familiar to anyone who's used an Adobe product in the past 5 or 10 years. There's a curves graph you can twist and bend to your liking, as well as eyedropper icons you can click on to select the areas of your image that you want to make pure black, white or set at the mid grey point, as well as sliders for the contrast, shadows, midtones and highlights.
      Another cool aspect of this customisation parameter is that you can set up a split tone between two colours for duo-toned images, choosing from just about any of the colours in the gamut of your image to play with.
      Focus
      This is not dissimilar to the Photoshop Unsharp Mask settings where you can sharpen or blur images using a series of three sliders for the amount, radius and threshold.
      Grain
      The grain customisation settings are very cool. You can select from a number of presets that Alien Skin have put in there as a starting point, then work out what looks best to your eye by playing with the sliders as mentioned earlier on in this review.
      IR
      If you're looking to make things glow in the light, this is the place for it! The IR purists will cry foul. Whether you chose to cry with them or not is entirely up to you.
      Vignette
      The settings to control the amount of vignetting you want range from the size of it right down to the ominously named "Lump Size". Go crazy.
      Border & Textures
      This is where it all began to fall apart for my sense of reality. After you've gone through the customisations above, you reach the bottom of the list and suddenly you find yourself being able to choose from a multitude of borders, light effects and dust & scratch simulations. There are truckloads of them that can be selected and manipulated in terms of their orientation and brightness inversions (black or white). The Instagram crowd will be in their element with this.
      How To Work With Exposure 5
      As I said at the beginning, you can run this program as a stand alone application, or as a plugin to Photoshop and/or Lightroom to suit your particular workflow. As a plugin the options are exactly the same as the stand-alone.
      You can also set it up to run batches of filters if you're that way inclined. Very simple. Just tell it where the images are and once you've selected the ones you want to process it adds them to a development queue. Hit the Save button and it will ask you for a destination folder. The next step sends a processed image to the desired location.
      File types
      When you're working with Exposure 5 in its stand alone guise, the file output will match what you feed into it. So, for instance if you bring in a JPG, you're going to take out a JPG, or if you bring in a TIFF you'll get back a new TIFF. It doesn't overwrite your original file.
      In Lightroom you right-click on an image, select Edit In>Exposure 5 and it will ask you what format you want to edit that RAW file in, whether you want to do it with existing Lr edits or not, plus a few other options. Once you're done in Exposure 5 the treated file is brought directly into your catalogue in the format you specified at the beginning. Neat.
      I'm not sure how it works in Photoshop, but if memory serves me it used to create a new layer with the adjustments on it, which you could then save as a PSD or flatten and save in a different way.
      Examples
      Here's some examples of my bad photos with an "artsy" twist.

      Vignette with big blobs and border (Fuji 1600 Neopan, I think?)

      Can't remember the film type, but the border is cool!
      Some Before & After Samples


      I went a bit nuts on this one, using a light leak filter and a grunge border.


      With this shot I opted for a Tri-X400 pushed 2 stops B&W conversion with a plain border.
      Conclusion
      Exposure 5 has definitely come of age and it offers users a lot of different ways to fiddle with images to get more sparkle out of them. It's not a cheap plugin, weighing in at $200 (more than Lightroom itself), but if you have an existing license from any of the previous versions you get the upgrade at $99, which I think is entirely fair considering the quality of the app.
      You can get a demo or buy the plugin from Alien Skin's website.
      If you've tried it yourself, please leave your own comments and sample images as replies here. I will add more samples as I go.

      View full article
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By visiting this website you are agreeing to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy & Guidelines.