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The old and the new


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rbsinto

There are still a few functioning pay telephone booths to be found in and around Toronto, but they are an endangered species, and likely soon to be come extinct.

We pass one frequently when we visit our children and grand children, and I thought it would be interesting to take some photos to show the juxtaposition of the old with the new, and employed three of our Grand-daughters to help me.

This is one shot of a series that I took.

Nikon D3

Nikon 24~70 2.8

ISO 1000 1/3200 @ 2.8

 

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I shoot film. That's film. F...i....l....m. You remember film don't you? It was in all the papers.

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There are still a few functioning pay telephone booths to be found in and around Toronto, but they are an endangered species, and likely soon to be come extinct. We pass one frequently when we vi

Thanks Dallas. We still have a number of functioning payphone booths and exterior payphone stations throughout Toronto, and the one in the photo still works. I had to explain to the grandchi

For all the South African non-boomers, then, this boomer still has a tickey saved when South Africa went decimal in 1961 (and kept when we left for Australia in February 1964).   Photographe

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Dallas

Nice, Robert. 

 

Gee, I remember callboxes. Here in South Africa we used to call them "tickey boxes" because the old British currency we used to have (pre-Republic days) included what they called a "threepenny" coin, which was also what a call unit cost. By the time I was born in 1968 the British standards had long gone but the term is still used by the older "boomer" generation to this day. Can't recall when last I saw one in operation here. 

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rbsinto
1 hour ago, Dallas said:

Nice, Robert. 

 

Gee, I remember callboxes. Here in South Africa we used to call them "tickey boxes" because the old British currency we used to have (pre-Republic days) included what they called a "threepenny" coin, which was also what a call unit cost. By the time I was born in 1968 the British standards had long gone but the term is still used by the older "boomer" generation to this day. Can't recall when last I saw one in operation here. 

Thanks Dallas.

We still have a number of functioning payphone booths and exterior payphone stations throughout Toronto, and the one in the photo still works.

I had to explain to the grandchildren what it was and what it was for, and they were incredulous.

Robert

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I shoot film. That's film. F...i....l....m. You remember film don't you? It was in all the papers.

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Alan7140
18 hours ago, Dallas said:

Nice, Robert. 

 

Gee, I remember callboxes. Here in South Africa we used to call them "tickey boxes" because the old British currency we used to have (pre-Republic days) included what they called a "threepenny" coin, which was also what a call unit cost. By the time I was born in 1968 the British standards had long gone but the term is still used by the older "boomer" generation to this day. Can't recall when last I saw one in operation here. 

 

For all the South African non-boomers, then, this boomer still has a tickey saved when South Africa went decimal in 1961 (and kept when we left for Australia in February 1964).

 

Photographed on a cm/inch ruler for scale :)

 

iDruNKc.jpg

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Dallas

Excellent Alan! I wonder what it's worth these days? I personally have never seen any of the old currency that was in use before 1961. 

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Alan7140
19 hours ago, Dallas said:

Excellent Alan! I wonder what it's worth these days? I personally have never seen any of the old currency that was in use before 1961. 

 

Probably worth nothing past the value of the metal it's made of, unfortunately, Dallas. Even as little kids we didn't get too upset if we lost one, and they were probably minted by the millions.

 

My Dad was an habitual collector of commemorative coins if they passed over the counter when people paid for petrol, however, and I have a few South African half-crown (5 shilling) tri-centennial commemorative coins that were passed on to me when he died in 1982, and which I kept as souvenirs of just how close I came to being a tri-centennial baby (I was born seven days into 1953). Compared to the tickey (or "tickie" if my long-forgotten Afrikaans spelling doesn't fail me?) they were massive, thick and heavy, and probably had a high silver content, and thus are probably worth something, although all were circulated coins showing years of wear which would reduce their collectible value a lot (the coin commemorated Jan van Riebeeck's arrival, proclamation and claiming the Cape Colony on behalf of the Dutch East India Company in 1652😞

 

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