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Seems strange that there have been a couple of major gear announcements in the past couple of weeks with barely a mention here.  I guess other things are making new gear seem pretty insignificant at the moment.  I guess the mirrorless market is starting to mature and people are pretty satisfied with what they already have.

 

So from Nikon today:  

  • Z5, looks like the sensor from the Z6 in the same body as the APS-C sensored Z50;
  • new kit lens for above;
  • couple of TCs.

 

And Canon a week or so back:

  • two higher end bodies
  • a few lenses, including some very long very slow , but fairly cheap, telephotos.

(I’ve never really got into Canon as even when I bought my first SLR over 20 years ago, I could never make sense of there naming patterns).

 

Personally, I’m waiting to see what new lenses Fuji has lined up - there are rumours of up to 4 by the end of the year.  Two totally new (One being the 50 f/1 and the other rumoured to be a 70-300) and two mkII (one unknown and the other rumoured to be the 27 mkII).  I’ve already got the original 27 and I’m not sure what they could add to a mkII to tempt me.  The 70-300 could be tempting, but size and price will be important.  The unknown mkII I’m hoping is the 60 macro finally going to 1:1.  If not, I am a bit tempted by the Laowa 65 macro, but there doesn’t seem to be any local stock and whilst Laowa do have an Australian website, I suspect they’ll ship from Hong Kong and who knows how long delivery will take at the moment.

 

 

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I think the GAS is there but everybody is holding on tight to the pennies they still have until the vaccine is out. Personally I haven't been paying much attention to the new camera market for a long time. I did briefly see a few YouTubers talking about the Canon R5 which is their new flagship mirrorless. Not cheap! I will look into the Nikon Z5 but it's never going to land on my gaming square. If I ever change camera brands I will most probably go with Sony A7 series bodies, which opens up a lot more lens choice since they can also drive Canon EF glass with the Metabones adapter. For now I continue to plod along with 2013's Olympus E-M1 bodies. :) 

 

Actually, I did obtain a "new" piece of kit today. Not what you think though, it's a literal barn find that I got at a steal from a commercial photographer who lives like literally around the corner from me (never heard of him before) and who is emigrating at the end of the year. This is an Inka professional camera stand with two heads on it, one from Inka and the other from the better known Foba. It stands 1,96m tall and has an arm swing of 1m (which I would love to extend). It has been sitting unused in his garage for years so I got it at a token price of a shade over $60 as it definitely isn't going with him. Getting it the 700m to my house involved a favour from an uncle and lots of muscle bringing it down the stairs to my front door! This thing weighs a ton! I will be using it for some flat lay video work and maybe even a bit of product photography if that work ever materialises for me again. I have dismantled my large product shooting table and am awaiting delivery of a laminate pine top that will replace the perspex. Having this beastly thing in the studio will make camera positioning a lot easier for most pack shots. It ain't going to get bumped out of position easily! 

 

 

IMG_2803.JPG

 

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The studio I first worked at in the 1970's had the Cambo predecessor of today's studio stands - and this sort of thing really is the only way to fly in a studio. Tripods are a PITA once you've used one of these.

 

I still have an enduring image of my boss standing with one foot on the pedestal, left arm draped over one extension arm with camera on the other operated with his right hand, scooting the thing around the studio floor getting the best angles on the models he''d be shooting.


Here's what that '70's version we used looked like - it stood about 7' tall so we had to use a step ladder when the head was higher up on the stand for high-angle shots that no studio tripod would have a hope of achieving so high or sturdily (the thing was as solid as the Rock of Gibraltar):


1464927856_CamboStudioStand1970s.thumb.jpg.c812d86566e590d7a2a236b905610918.jpg

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Fix up some sort of negative holder and you'll rattle through resampling your old negatives set up on there - it should keep the distance fixed and everything square.

 

Jumping back to the announcements - I think the interesting features are the small details.  It seems the Z5 has finally gone for USB-C with PD meaning it can run off a USB power bank.  That will be a lot easier than needing a bag of extra batteries (and the power bank can keep you phone charged too).  

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Alan, I haven't even used it proper yet, but I am already so taken with the versatility that I don't think I would ever be without one again in a studio environment. I discovered that the brackets that hold the heads in place can also rotate 360˚, so by turning the geared head to the right and then adding the Koba 3-way head onto it, I have the perfect reach that I need for overhead stuff. I just need to get a tray made up out of angle iron that I can bolt onto the main outer spine and I can do tethering with ease, no cables laying around anywhere (or any light stands because I can use the other bracket that the Koba head was on to mount my main bounce light for the ceiling. This thing is undoubtedly the best bit of studio kit I have ever bought. 

 

 

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