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waltonksm

Some tundra flowers

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Here are a few tundra flowers.  Lately I have spent time taking photos, but have not had much time for editing.  So tonight I spent a bit of time editing a few images. I used the Olympus 60mm f2.8 macro lens.

A Single-flowered Cinquefoil:

Single-flowered Cinquefoil

 

A tall Jaob's ladder

Tall Jacob's Ladder

 

Flowering Labrador tea.

Labrador Tea

 

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Thanks Walton.  How are you finding the 60mm lens now that you have had it for a while?

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Posted (edited)

I was thinking about your recommendation as I took these shots.  I had been using the 60mm macro exclusively, but thought I would try my 12-50mm macro again; I had to search for it, as it has not had much use this past year.  After five minutes with the 12-50mm I was back to the 60mm macro.  I got rid of the 30mm macro lens last year (I gave it to my brother in law, who is now leaving his Nikon gear at home and only taking MFT equipment with him on his trips.) Yes, this is the macro lens I am keeping in my bag. I have a sense that I can get greater depth of field with the 60mm macro. I cannot give you a better explanation, but it just "works better" than my other macro capable lenses. 

Another problem I have with these photos is the wind.  The location for many of these flowers is a rocky overlook above the confluence of the Andreafsky with the Yukon River. This spot was chosen for the location of a 900 MW wind turbine.  It is really tough to get macro shots without bumping up the ISO and going to very fast shutter speeds. I am often shooting in 20 MPH winds and more at this spot.  It is difficult to eliminate all of the "shake" when shooting with these winds.  As I indicated in several posts, there are plants growing here that I have not seen anywhere else in our region. The soil is not very deep, and much of the ground is very rocky, so I have a very different set of plants here.

So YES, the 60mm macro is my preferred macro lens these days. The alpine azaleas, below, are about the size of a pencil eraser. And they were moving a lot when I snapped these mages (which are still not as sharp as I would like.)

 

Alpine Azalea

 

 

Edited by waltonksm
to correct punctuation
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Not sure if this contraption would be any use in such strong winds as it would probably blow away itself, but I suppose if you modified it with spikes or used rocks you could weight it down and get less wind on the flowers. 

 

I have no idea what they are called, but we had a couple of them on our 2013 safari for the wildflowers. 

DALL4775.jpg

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That looks like a slick solution--for handling lighting, if nothing else.  No, it would take two more people to hold it in place.  It would need to be staked down.  I think a smaller "shield" or some such thing might work to block the winds from one direction, only.

On a positive note, the winds do keep the mosquitoes away.  The past three years I have not even used mosquito spray.  This year it is sold out.  They are making up for the past three years.

 

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Don’t talk about mosquitoes. I get woken up every other morning between 2-5am with one or two buzzing around my ears. And its supposed to be winter here.

 

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I finally found an inexpensive bug zapper that works.  Only $29 (USD) and it zaps them with a big spark.  I do not know how it works, but it even zaps the little "noseeums." And for those that are buzzing around my ear at 2 AM,  I have some portable zappers shaped like small tennis rackets. They also serve me well. I never have thought that I am a sadist, but I admit to great satisfaction when I hear a good spark, accompanied by a loud "zap."

49928395318_befbc274d4_b.jpg

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Hi Walton, thanks for sharing your colourful Arctic  flora with us - esepecially nice as we are now into our southern winter months.  Wind is an ever present enemy when working close up and  at higher magnifications.  Glad that the 60mm lens is working out for you.  Mine is always in my camera bag.

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