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Alan7140

Tasmanian Wedge-Tailed Eagles

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Normally, you need to be lucky just to see one.  Three is amazing - and close enough to photograph.  All I've ever seen is a distant silhouette.

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Nice capture.


Aguinaldo

www.aguinaldodepaula.com

Nikon / Zeiss

"You are not a loser when you're defeated.
You are a loser when you quit".
(Dr. House)

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Fantastic, Alan! 

 

I'm not a big birder but there is definitely a thrill in seeing something elusive in the avian world. Last year I was sitting at my desk when I swore I heard an African fish eagle. Went and had a look outside and yes, there were two of them flying around the neighbourhood. Alas too far away for me to be able to get even a midway decent shot. 

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Dallas said:

Fantastic, Alan! 

 

I'm not a big birder but there is definitely a thrill in seeing something elusive in the avian world. Last year I was sitting at my desk when I swore I heard an African fish eagle. Went and had a look outside and yes, there were two of them flying around the neighbourhood. Alas too far away for me to be able to get even a midway decent shot. 

 

That's the usual story with Wedge-tails as Chris confirms above - they fly very high as a rule, and cover amazing distances simply riding the thermals. I have photographed them before, but as posting these photos on a couple of local social media pages has confirmed, to see three wild eagles together in the one tree outside of an actual nesting situation is pretty much unheard of.

 

The mainland species are more plentiful than here in Tasmania, where this island State's manic obsession with logging has decimated breeding habitat, along with the State's principally hydro-electric power supply's dams largely located in the remote and wetter west of the island providing further obstacles in the way of transmission towers and associated lethal live wires crossing the remnant habitat, and yet further complicated with the eagles' difficulties in anticipating and navigating around the revolving blades of the increasing number of wind turbines springing up in open areas. Add to that the eagles' rather lazy habit of feeding in situ on road-kill and therefore often suffering the same fate themselves and you have the perfect recipe for yet another human-caused extinction event in the making.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Alan7140
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When we tried returning to Australia in 1990, we built a house on 20 acres in the Adelaide Hills near Clarendon. We had Kuitpo forest on one side (endless riding), the McLaren Vale vineyards on the other leading to some of the best beaches in Australia. We would often see wedge-tailed eagles while out riding, and frequently they would sit in trees alongside the track and let us get quite close .. they used the tracks for hunting, as the buzzards do here.

 

Another fabulous bird there was the Sulphur Crested Black Cockatoo, large flocks of them sitting up in the pine trees. You had to be careful, because they would eat the fruity bits of pine cones and chuck the rest, so you'd be riding along with cones thudding the sand around you like mortar bombs !

 

Raptor persecution is a big issue here now (particularly with grouse shooting), which I inadvertently got involved in when I found my neighbour about to blast the active nest of a Red Kite .. here's the male over my house ..

 

1193907493_20160429145430.thumb.jpg.6ef9cd0e270689e2c7404443b22d0d5a.jpg

 

D4, Sig 120-300 @300 f5.6 iso 400 handheld arms aching

 

The female on the nest ..

 

242793846_20160421104722.thumb.jpg.1c82d4197229df868a7326d299f9c5eb.jpg

 

D800E 400 f2.8 @ f8 TC20Eiii 1/500 iso 400 tripod from driveway

 

cheers, Maurice

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"Wild things are always faster"

from 'Two Dogs' by Philip Hodgins

Wild-Things@btconnect.com

www.Wild-Things-Photography.com

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38 minutes ago, CarreraS said:

 

Another fabulous bird there was the Sulphur Crested Black Cockatoo, large flocks of them sitting up in the pine trees. You had to be careful, because they would eat the fruity bits of pine cones and chuck the rest, so you'd be riding along with cones thudding the sand around you like mortar bombs !

 

cheers, Maurice

 

My two pine trees are under constant assault by Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos at the moment, as it happens. Here are three of a chick which was grumbling at mother because it couldn't figure out how to get to the pine-cone's heart.

 

sIARXXM.jpg

 

4tIhYwn.jpg

 

8SjvN1z.jpg

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Excellent ! Maybe I should have tried Tasmania .. but I went there on a CMF exercise as a youth, all I remember is the bloody leeches !

 

Suppose there's no chance ScoMo will stop the logging ?

 

cheers, Maurice


"Wild things are always faster"

from 'Two Dogs' by Philip Hodgins

Wild-Things@btconnect.com

www.Wild-Things-Photography.com

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16 minutes ago, CarreraS said:

Excellent ! Maybe I should have tried Tasmania .. but I went there on a CMF exercise as a youth, all I remember is the bloody leeches !

 

Suppose there's no chance ScoMo will stop the logging ?

 

cheers, Maurice

 

No chance whatever. Looking at a Google Earth view of southern Tassie in particular shows that they're now joining the clearfells to finalise the destruction of the remaining old growth patches to be replaced with fast-growing Shining Gums (Eucalyptus nitens) fire-bombs (native to Vic & NSW, not Tasmania). That it continues at a loss-making rate with such gusto must mean that some serious money must be changing hands under the table.

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