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What Photography Books Do You Have?

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I have collected a few hardcovers over the years, mostly photojournalism related, but I also have works by other photographers and some compilations too. Here are some:

 

Not Fade Away - Jim Marshall (signed 2nd edition)

Match Prints - Jim Marshall & Timothy White

Exposed - Mick Rock

Encounters With The Dragon - Jone Hone (about the Drakensberg Mountains)

Raconteur Road - Obie Oberholzer

Taking Aim - Graham Nash

Living Landscapes Of Southern Africa - David Rogers

In Search Of The African Lion - Roger & Pat De La Harpe

Moments - The Pulitzer Prize Winners

This Is Gonna Hurt - Nikki Sixx

The Rolling Stones 1972 - Jim Marshall

 

I also still have a fair number of technique books by the likes of Michael Freeman and many others. I sold a lot of them several years ago. 

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A few of mine:

 

Photo Books.jpg

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I also have The Photographer's Eye and The Photographer's Mind by Michael Freeman. I must be honest, I found them very difficult to read through. He doesn't have a writing style that I find easy. Maybe I should give them another try...

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Yes, I have several Michael Freeman books in my substantial photographic library, but unlike you Dallas I have found them quite useful.

One of my favourite photographic books however is 'Pictures on a Page' by Harold Evans the former editor of the Sunday Times when it also issued the excellent magazine along with the paper. The book takes us behind published images describing how they may be improved so that our 'seeing' is enhanced, discussing ethics, the implication of cropping and much more.  Although featuring  upwards of 500 many iconic pictures the book is a fascinating marriage of words and pictures. Highly recommended.

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Still trying.

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My main two shelves in my bookshelf holds text books from my university years, my second wave of information gathering when I started my own business specialising in copy/restoration and history aspects of photography, and my later drift to include firstly the glamour/nude craze that surfaced in the '80's, and later into landscape and portrait photography. I guess they pretty much sum up the contents of my career until 2018, when I tried to retire. :) Nowadays it's back to proper B&W film photography and the early books have become useful again.

 

Disregard the few guitar-related books at upper right which simply wouldn't fit size-wise on the lower shelves which contain books of more general nature.

 

These days Google has replaced the need for much of my general photographic research, but there are many photography books here that are well out of print or as rare as hen's teeth given their historical nature or the narrow scope of their subject matter, and as such are still invaluable to me as reference material.

 

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It's interesting to see the difference in our book collections regarding subject or process. Most of my photography books are subject related. I think the only ones I have that are process based are the Freeman books, Photography Q&A by Zack Arias (a very good book for those looking to do this as a business) and one or two others.

 

I learn more about photography from seeing the work of others and then investigating their techniques, rather than learning the techniques and then trying to apply those to whatever work I am doing. Neither approach is wrong, just different. :) 

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1 hour ago, Dallas said:

It's interesting to see the difference in our book collections regarding subject or process. Most of my photography books are subject related. I think the only ones I have that are process based are the Freeman books, Photography Q&A by Zack Arias (a very good book for those looking to do this as a business) and one or two others.

 

I learn more about photography from seeing the work of others and then investigating their techniques, rather than learning the techniques and then trying to apply those to whatever work I am doing. Neither approach is wrong, just different. :) 


I'm the polar opposite - I take little or no notice of what or how other photographers work - I'm one who investigates and experiments, then applies techniques and processes thus learned to achieve an outcome that I seek to achieve. Much of my work is thus pre-visualised and conceived, and the actual photography is planned and predictable in the end. Very often photos taken during the exploration stages end up as a result in their own right, but more often than not the final photo that results from much planning and thought is the final step, and I'll then start again in a new vein on another project or theme.

 

I reckon that's pretty evident just in the photos I've posted here over the years - digital stitched panos, then stitched and stacked panos, then efforts at getting a better result in digital B&W by using Sigma's Foveon sensors in mono mode, then returning to 35mm, and then 120 B&W film with varied subject matter, to the current use of original c.1900 half-plate and full-plate cameras & lenses using B&W printing paper for negatives.

 

In almost none of the above have I taken the slightest bit of notice of what anyone else may or may not be doing in the same fields at the same time. :)  I guess that's why I'm always out of step with what the majority movement is in photography at any time. :D :D 

 

 

(The amount of books on the nude I have in the book-case might indicate otherwise to the above, but that was merely to get myself familiar in general with past and present styles to come up with something original at a time when "Boudoir" photography was all the rage, but when in reality it was almost impossible to separate one photographer from another in the visual appearance of the end results. The framer who I was working on this with at the time eventually agreed that we give the whole thing a miss as the fad was increasingly looking as if it would fizzle out quickly, which is indeed what happened.)

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Nude photography never passed muster in my career. I just couldn't do it, probably because of my conservative upbringing, but also because I am averse to anything remotely narcissistic. In fact, if I never photograph another human being for money again I'd be quite happy. In meeting people who discover that I am a photographer I often get asked if I do family shoots, or weddings, etc. My answer is usually along the lines of "I only photograph things that don't talk back to me." ;) 

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Books, books .. I got some somewhere ..

 

Techie stuff, mostly useless !

 

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"Wild things are always faster"

from 'Two Dogs' by Philip Hodgins

Wild-Things@btconnect.com

www.Wild-Things-Photography.com

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Photography collection .. top shelf !

 

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Middle shelf

 

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Lower shelf

 

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I obviously need more !!

 

cheers, Maurice

 

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"Wild things are always faster"

from 'Two Dogs' by Philip Hodgins

Wild-Things@btconnect.com

www.Wild-Things-Photography.com

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Photography and other techniques .. and the big fat Africa book (what you can do with an 800 mm lens, lots of plane hire and enough dosh to spend a few years on safari !) .. oh, and a few boxes ! And some audio bits !

 

_ACT0792.thumb.JPG.9be31788a99ae878c368462fd0c5f432.JPG

 

 


"Wild things are always faster"

from 'Two Dogs' by Philip Hodgins

Wild-Things@btconnect.com

www.Wild-Things-Photography.com

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And then there's the coffee table .. The Cartier Bresson is a recent facsimile edition - really excellent !

Yann Artus-Bertrand got me going on horses ! J gave me the Zanele Muholi - you might have seen her stuff, Dallas ?

Nick Brandt does some good B&W wildlife work, as long as you can ignore some of the canned border effects ..

I picked up the Klimt in Hay on Wye once - always loved his work !

 

_ACT0797.thumb.JPG.d08a02f49153c733df7c8f53e07316d9.JPG

 

Done sharing !

 

cheers, Maurice

 

 

 

 

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"Wild things are always faster"

from 'Two Dogs' by Philip Hodgins

Wild-Things@btconnect.com

www.Wild-Things-Photography.com

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14 hours ago, CarreraS said:

J gave me the Zanele Muholi - you might have seen her stuff, Dallas ?

 

No, can't say I have heard of her. 

 

But I found a snap with your collection... 

 

IMG_2701.JPG

 

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On 01/05/2020 at 00:05, Dallas said:

I have collected a few hardcovers over the years, mostly photojournalism related, but I also have works by other photographers and some compilations too. Here are some:

 

Not Fade Away - Jim Marshall (signed 2nd edition)

Match Prints - Jim Marshall & Timothy White

Exposed - Mick Rock

Encounters With The Dragon - Jone Hone (about the Drakensberg Mountains)

Raconteur Road - Obie Oberholzer

Taking Aim - Graham Nash

Living Landscapes Of Southern Africa - David Rogers

In Search Of The African Lion - Roger & Pat De La Harpe

Moments - The Pulitzer Prize Winners

This Is Gonna Hurt - Nikki Sixx

The Rolling Stones 1972 - Jim Marshall

 

I also still have a fair number of technique books by the likes of Michael Freeman and many others. I sold a lot of them several years ago. 

 

Jim Marshall and Mick Rock are such icons in music photography. I dipped my feet into music photographer for a bit, but the number of fans with digital cameras willing to give free pictures had already begun to decimate the industry and I was well established in the IT profession so I moved into portraits, which I can do on my time.

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Unfortunately I never made a dime doing performance photography, yet it is the one area of working that I would prefer over all others. Except for maybe surfing photography.

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