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Akira

Some initial images from Sigma fp...

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...with the 42mm/f2.8 kit lens.

_SDI0075.jpg

 

 

_SDI0086.jpg

 

 

_SDI0123.jpg

Edited by Akira
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"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

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I miss details in the shadows areas.

Akira, why did you choose this Sigma camera ( I've never heard about it before) instead of a Nikon mirrorless? I know you use Nikons DSLR.


Aguinaldo

www.aguinaldodepaula.com

Nikon / Zeiss

"You are not a loser when you're defeated.
You are a loser when you quit".
(Dr. House)

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Agree with Aguinaldo about the shadow detail. Definitely would benefit from a lift. 

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Aguialdo and Dallas, thank you for the comments.

 

Are you referring to the last image?  I did lift the shadow a bit, but, since I found the light on the lower left from the headlight of a car, I refrained from lifting the shadow any further.  The main subjects in the image are the various lights from the sun, the moon, the signals and the car.

 

13 hours ago, atpaula said:

Akira, why did you choose this Sigma camera ( I've never heard about it before) instead of a Nikon mirrorless? I know you use Nikons DSLR.

 

I'm mostly a standard lens shooter, and D750 with AF-S 50/1.8 was my favorite combo when we met in Shinjuku.  After that, I was looking for some mirrorless system that would offer a smaller combo.  Then it was apparent that neither Nikon or Canon were going to build a compact full-frame mirrorless system: the cameras were smaller but the lenses are bigger.

 

I once settled on the Fujifilm system, but neither f1.4 or f2.0 standard (35mm for the APS-C format) lenses satisfied me, and Zeiss Touit 32/1.8 became my favorite.  The image quality of X-E3 and X-T3 was excellent especially when the files were processed with Capture One Express Fujifilm (free software).  However, I could never really endorse their design concept of recreating the film cameras, rangefinder or SLR, which contradicts with my belief in the "form follows function" concept.

 

Then came Sigma fp.  It is nearly as small as the tiny Panasonic GX850 but is a full-frame camera.  When I read the announcement, I remembered that I wanted D700 without the mirror and the OVF, when D700 was released: a mirrorless full-frame compact camera.  Instead of Nikon, Sigma offered the very camera I wanted.  The 45/2.8 kit lens turned out to be an excellent all-rounder.  Its speed is rather slow (I would have liked if it were f2.0), which is made up for by the camera's amazing high-ISO performance.  The low-light AF performance is admirable.  The contrast-detect AF is only a bit slower than Panasonic, but not frustrating to me, and its accuracy is of no problem.

 

There is a serious caveat to Sigma fp, though.  The jello effect is HUGE because of its pure electronic shutter, when you shoot objects that are moving fast, especially they pass  right in front of the lens.  But in general shooting conditions, it doesn't affect on the image at all.  The signal read-out speed from the sensor is actually surprisingly fast when compared to other full-frame cameras.

 

Also, the moire tend to appear more frequently than other full-frame cameras because it lacks the AA filter.  I don't know any other full-frame cameras with 24MP sensors without AA filters.  I could live with that.

 

All in all, Sigma fp feels very promising.  I love its simplistic design.  The form follows the function admirably here.

Edited by Akira
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.

Akira, I like your new camera.  

 

I have shot nearly every camera there is.   I currently shoot:  Panasonic M4/3, Fuji X Aps-c, Pentax full frame, and Nikon full frame.    The Sigma FP will be my next camera.  It is the future of cameras.

Edited by blurmagic
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Thank you Akira.

My move is going to be towards the Z6. Mirrorless is my future.

I like it so much that I see myself selling my D5 in the near future. My D4s is already for sale.

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Aguinaldo

www.aguinaldodepaula.com

Nikon / Zeiss

"You are not a loser when you're defeated.
You are a loser when you quit".
(Dr. House)

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1 hour ago, blurmagic said:

.

Akira, I like your new camera.  

 

I have shot nearly every camera there is.   I currently shoot:  Panasonic M4/3, Fuji X Aps-c, Pentax full frame, and Nikon full frame.    The Sigma FP will be my next camera.  It is the future of cameras.

 

30 minutes ago, atpaula said:

Thank you Akira.

My move is going to be towards the Z6. Mirrorless is my future.

I like it so much that I see myself selling my D5 in the near future. My D4s is already for sale.

 

I agree.  And to me, the Sigma fp is not only the future but also the answer closest to the question of what a true digital camera ought to have been.

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12 hours ago, Akira said:

Also, the moire tend to appear more frequently than other full-frame cameras because it lacks the AA filter.  I don't know any other full-frame cameras with 24MP sensors without AA filters.  I could live with that.

 

Leica has a few 24MP cameras which lack the AA filter (eg SL, M240, M10). Easy to get moire on them too. 

 

But note it is also not very difficult to get moire on the 47MP Z7...

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1 hour ago, Noct said:

 

Leica has a few 24MP cameras which lack the AA filter (eg SL, M240, M10). Easy to get moire on them too. 

 

But note it is also not very difficult to get moire on the 47MP Z7...

 

Oh, yes, I totally forgot about the Leica M series!  Thank you for the correction.


"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

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14 hours ago, Akira said:

 

I once settled on the Fujifilm system, but neither f1.4 or f2.0 standard (35mm for the APS-C format) lenses satisfied me, and Zeiss Touit 32/1.8 became my favorite.  The image quality of X-E3 and X-T3 was excellent especially when the files were processed with Capture One Express Fujifilm (free software).  However, I could never really endorse their design concept of recreating the film cameras, rangefinder or SLR, which contradicts with my belief in the "form follows function" concept.

 

 

It is a shame that the Fuji hasn't satisfied you.  I would disagree with you on the comment about 'recreating film camera'  - I like the fact that it goes back to a traditional camera feel and find it is a benefit to me.  If I really need to, I can set the dials to make it behave like the electronic digital and late film era cameras or I can stick with the traditional SLR/rangefinder behaviour.  That look and feel lasted for around 50yrs before the addition of autofocus and other electronics bulked cameras up and made the larger grip a necessity (both for ergonomics and a place to hide a the bigger batteries).

 

But then everyone has different needs and desires.... 

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14 hours ago, crowecg said:

 

It is a shame that the Fuji hasn't satisfied you.  I would disagree with you on the comment about 'recreating film camera'  - I like the fact that it goes back to a traditional camera feel and find it is a benefit to me.  If I really need to, I can set the dials to make it behave like the electronic digital and late film era cameras or I can stick with the traditional SLR/rangefinder behaviour.  That look and feel lasted for around 50yrs before the addition of autofocus and other electronics bulked cameras up and made the larger grip a necessity (both for ergonomics and a place to hide a the bigger batteries).

 

But then everyone has different needs and desires.... 

 

I'm not necessarily against the film-camera-like control system for the shutter-, ISO- and exposure compensation dials or aperture rings on the lenses.  They are handy because you can see the settings without pushing the function buttons or even switching the camera on.

 

What I don't like about Fujifilm is their "make-believe" film camera design concept.  I picked up X-E3 at first because it looked least like a film camera in their lineup and switched to X-T3 for the excellent AF system.  The co-existence of the dedicated dial system from the film cameras and the assignable system of buttons/command dials makes the overall user interface cluttered and superfluous.

 

Sigma fp is not a camera perfectly comparable to the established DSLR or mirrorless cameras of other makes, but it works well enough for my shooting style, and I really love its stripped-down design.  The placements and assignments of the control buttons and dials are a bit unique, but it is well worth trying to get used to.

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I couldn't function without a proper viewfinder, though. Even Sigma calls that function on the fp a "monitor".

 

I still have two of the rather obvious predecessors in form of this new camera, Sigma dp 1 & 3 Merrills, which I bought back in 2014 (or 15) for their unique Foveon sensor, which has no horizontally adjacent-sensels interpolation but has three vertical layers of 16MP arrays embedded in a silicone chip which absorbs blue, green and finally red light as the light travels down through this microscopically thin chip - so no filters on individual sensels, just a single micro-lens array on top. While the colours and sharpness that result are amazing, and rendering a B&W image is in a whole other league (except for the Leica Monochrom) when only using the uppermost layer of sensels, the amount of data gathered and transmitted for the RGB layers was huge for the time (16MP x 3) which caused heat and operating speed problems and effectively stopped an even higher resolution Foveon, let alone a 135 frame version. Low light performance was poor as the progressively lower layers got less light transmitted, which then required electronic boosting to the same levels as the upper layer, and therefore a lot more noise. B&W was not affected when using just the top layer, so it still did OK at 1600 ISO, and was still usable at 6400. Colour started to become visibly noisy at 400 ISO, and in reality 640 ISO was about as far as would be classed as passable.

 

Their next sensor (Quattro & Quattro-H - 19.6MP APS-C & 25MP APS-H respectively) got around the heat problem to some degree by making the sensels of lower two arrays four time the size of the upper layer, therefore re-introducing the need for interpolation to a degree, but as the sensels were still stacked vertically there was no moire problem as with Bayer. For whatever reason, Sigma never bothered to properly sort the B&W from top layer only thing with their Sigma Photo Pro software, and while it should have been as good theoretically as the Merrills had produced, my experience with the sd-Quattro-H has absolutely proved that not to be the case. In Aussie terms it was, and still is, "half-arsed".

 

So while I read glowing reports on the new fp camera on the Internet, its abandonment of Foveon for Bayer makes it just another Bayer array image capture & process camera with strong video-centric leanings to me, even if they omitted the AA filter and used a 135 frame size, which will probably lose Sigma their existing Foveon fan base, particularly if the hopes of that fan base that Sigma will break with its Bayer partners Panasonic and Leica in their upcoming version of the "L" camera when (and even if) it is properly announced. However indications are that the trials and tribulations involved with making a practical 'proper' Foveon sensor in 135 size may well have defeated them, and the Foveon in a new generation of cameras will disappear altogether, which is a real shame as it was, in reality, the only truly different colour sensor ever brought to market other than some form of single-layer interpolated Bayer/X-Trans array.

 

From my point of view, that effectively ends any hope of a decent B&W image ever being produced from a colour-capable sensor within the effective period left to me to actually get to use such a thing, which is yet another reason I'll die with the smell of bromide and sodium thiosulphate in my nostrils and silver stains on my hands. For me B&W stills photography always did, and still does rule, as thankfully film and darkroom supplies are increasingly available, and with a growing following. :D

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4 hours ago, Alan7140 said:

I couldn't function without a proper viewfinder, though. Even Sigma calls that function on the fp a "monitor".

 

Their next sensor (Quattro & Quattro-H - 19.6MP APS-C & 25MP APS-H respectively) got around the heat problem to some degree by making the sensels of lower two arrays four time the size of the upper layer, therefore re-introducing the need for interpolation to a degree, but as the sensels were still stacked vertically there was no moire problem as with Bayer. For whatever reason, Sigma never bothered to properly sort the B&W from top layer only thing with their Sigma Photo Pro software, and while it should have been as good theoretically as the Merrills had produced, my experience with the sd-Quattro-H has absolutely proved that not to be the case. In Aussie terms it was, and still is, "half-arsed".

 

So while I read glowing reports on the new fp camera on the Internet, its abandonment of Foveon for Bayer makes it just another Bayer array image capture & process camera with strong video-centric leanings to me, even if they omitted the AA filter and used a 135 frame size, which will probably lose Sigma their existing Foveon fan base, particularly if the hopes of that fan base that Sigma will break with its Bayer partners Panasonic and Leica in their upcoming version of the "L" camera when (and even if) it is properly announced. However indications are that the trials and tribulations involved with making a practical 'proper' Foveon sensor in 135 size may well have defeated them, and the Foveon in a new generation of cameras will disappear altogether, which is a real shame as it was, in reality, the only truly different colour sensor ever brought to market other than some form of single-layer interpolated Bayer/X-Trans array.

 

From my point of view, that effectively ends any hope of a decent B&W image ever being produced from a colour-capable sensor within the effective period left to me to actually get to use such a thing, which is yet another reason I'll die with the smell of bromide and sodium thiosulphate in my nostrils and silver stains on my hands. For me B&W stills photography always did, and still does rule, as thankfully film and darkroom supplies are increasingly available, and with a growing following. :D

 

When the CEO of Sigma presented fp, he added that the development of a new FOVEON model was in progress.  I'm curious how it would materialize.

 

The dedicated DPP software works all-too slow, and its highlight recovery is insufficient.  I decided to return to the subscription of Adobe CC.

 

I'm still interested in FOVEON sensor and wish that the monochrome processing using the full-resolution top layer.  Or wish for the integration of the B&W function into the camera.


"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

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Oh, I would have to mention that the flash synch speed is 1/30 in JPEG mode and in RAW mode, a whopping 1/15.  LOL!

 

So, definitely it is not for the strobe shooters.


"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

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7 hours ago, Alan7140 said:

I couldn't function without a proper viewfinder

Nor could I.

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1 minute ago, vivionm said:

Nor could I.

I think nobody could.

The Nikon Z6 viewfinder is excellent for me. 


Aguinaldo

www.aguinaldodepaula.com

Nikon / Zeiss

"You are not a loser when you're defeated.
You are a loser when you quit".
(Dr. House)

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17 hours ago, atpaula said:

I think nobody could.

The Nikon Z6 viewfinder is excellent for me. 

 

I disagree!    I have not used any viewfinder for years.  I focus with a Zacuto viewfinder over the LCD screen on the back of the camera.

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One of the the biggest reasons for the varying opinions for the ideal viewfinder is that the individual eye is the integrated part of the optical system of the viewfinder.  Thus there will be no single agreement or end of the discussion!  :D

Edited by Akira
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"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

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Some dusk images.

_SDI0159.jpg

 

 

_SDI0167.jpg

 

 

_SDI0168.jpg

 

 

_SDI0172.jpg

 

 

_SDI0177.jpg

Edited by Akira

"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

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