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Alan7140

And yet another modification...

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Congratulations Alan.  Nice work. 

 

I can see that you did not entirely mis-spend your youth (as my neighbour recently said to me as I was picking the lock to my ancient car to get at the keys I left locked inside it! ;)).

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1 hour ago, Hugh_3170 said:

Congratulations Alan.  Nice work. 

 

I can see that you did not entirely mis-spend your youth (as my neighbour recently said to me as I was picking the lock to my ancient car to get at the keys I left locked inside it! ;)).

 

:D ...or I'm just really convincing in delivering a good alibi, maybe?

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...and finally, after the pick-n-pull foam insert of the Gearsafe weatherproof case I bought to house all the Pentacon gear (now two bodies and seven lenses) had pulled itself apart all on its own after just three months, I made a set of solid MDF dividers with relevant compartments for the gear all padded with tough self-adhesive construction foam all luxuriously covered with dark red crushed velvet to pamper the old gear in a way I doubt any of it got in their respective past lives.

 

The case with contents weighs in at a svelte 14.7kg (32lb). 🙂

 

QUNmRb5.jpg

Edited by Alan7140
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17 hours ago, Dallas said:

That pick-n-pluck foam is the worst design curse inflicted on photographers since the invention of photography! Appalling stuff...

 

Looking on the bright side, at least the pick-n-pluck's woeful performance forced me into making a proper insert for the case, solidly customised for the individual items that would be stored there. The stiff dividers added another bonus by acting as bracing, substantially strengthening the case itself and it now happily bears my weight without flexing if I stand on it when it's stood upright, giving me a handy high-level view if needed, which is something I haven't trusted a case to do since my old Hasselblad case back in the '90's. All my cases since then have been either soft shell or flimsy plywood/aluminium veneer, anything better than that was invariably ridiculously expensive, but this Chinese Pelican-style knockoff at AU$120 was cheap and is now as strong as it'll ever need to be. Without the dividers the shell was a bit flexible, but now that's fixed.

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Nice work Alan.  I might have opted for blue, but the red ain't half bad and it is the correct colour for the bits from the iron curtain side (LOL).

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5 minutes ago, Hugh_3170 said:

Nice work Alan.  I might have opted for blue, but the red ain't half bad and it is the correct colour for the bits from the iron curtain side (LOL).


|I've been tripping over that piece of velvet for almost four decades now, Hugh - I bought it way back around 1984 as a background for a studio table-top job I did, and only ever used that one time. I just figured it that now was time it was put to a final use, and wanted to use as much unused stuff lying around as possible - in the end all I bought was the  roll of builders' expansion-joint foam spacer for the padding, the rest was 'recycling' (the sheet of 4x2' MDF for the spacers themselves had a price sticker of $2.95, so it goes back a long time as well).

 

The photo, as usual with velvet, shows it off to be brighter than it really is - in real life it is a deep burgundy in colour, but if I corrected things to show that the cameras and lenses would almost be invisible. It did the same colour-brightening thing for the photographic job I originally bought it for (using colour film, of course), but the client was happy enough with the result. It might have been different had she chosen the material personally or had been there when I took the shot and therefore seen the real colour, though. :D

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Once I had Kiev-6C. I really liked the device. All I completed in it was loosening the mirror return spring (reducing cotton and eliminating rebound) and exchanging the paralon damper (which takes the impact of the mirror on itself) with a foam rubber damper, giving it a certain beveled profile so that it catches the mirror gently.
Then my friend persuaded me to sell him this device. I still regret it. Despite the external absurdity, the camera was highly reliable and simple.

Ah, yes, I also rewound it to him and he didn’t shoot 12 frames on 13 standard films on me. In this case, the gap between the frames decreased from 6 mm to 2 mm.

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Ars longa vita brevis

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