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vivionm

Fuji system for sale

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I am selling the following Fuji gear:

 

Fuji XT-1 Body

Fujinon  XF 35 mm 1.4

Fujinon XF 56 mm 1.2

Fujinon 10-24 mm 4

Fujinon 18-55 mm 2.8-4

Fujinon 50-140 mm

Teleconverter 1.4

EF-X 20 Flash.

All in perfect condition. No boxes, but the pictured padded briefcase will be included in the sale.

Asking €3,500 for the lot.

Will ship by DHL anywhere in Europe at my expense.

Fuji.jpg

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This equipment is no longer for sale.

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Change of heart Vivion?


Mike Gorman

 

Nikon Z6, Nikkor Z 24-70, 35, 85, FTZ adapter 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Panasonic 15, 20, 25, - 8-18, 12-35, 12-60, 35-100

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Yes, Mike.

Not reverting to film, so will keep the  Fuji system.

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In my eyes changing to a film system must be purely for nostalgic reasons, no bad thing in itself. But personally I don’t get it.

Hey ho each to his/her own.


Mike Gorman

 

Nikon Z6, Nikkor Z 24-70, 35, 85, FTZ adapter 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Panasonic 15, 20, 25, - 8-18, 12-35, 12-60, 35-100

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Mike,

For me nostalgia was certainly a part of it, but not the whole reason. I started out in photography with a Canon AE-1, shooting slide film.

Returning to film a few years ago made me a better photographer, because I did not wish to waste film.

It  was also true that the Zeiss Ikon was so simple, manual focus, aperture priority or full manual exposure. It felt so good in the hand and was a joy to shoot with.

But, as I have said, I will not be going back to film.

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The resurrection of Ektachrome has only further fueled a fantastic interest in film by the under-30 crowd. Nostalgia may be part of it but reviving my Nikon FM2-T and FM3a has been worth it. They force greater deliberation and consideration of light, shadow and framing. A healthy exercise for any photographer.

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On 18/11/2019 at 13:18, ed said:

The resurrection of Ektachrome has only further fueled a fantastic interest in film by the under-30 crowd. Nostalgia may be part of it but reviving my Nikon FM2-T and FM3a has been worth it. They force greater deliberation and consideration of light, shadow and framing. A healthy exercise for any photographer.

 

Still missing, though, is a manufacturer making an affordable, well-designed and 'serious' film camera system, be that just 35mm, or 120 and large format as well. The supply of good used cameras of all formats is becoming tenuous, and most, aside from already having had one period of use last Century, have spent the ensuing 15-20 years sitting in various conditions of storage, most of which are not conducive to clockwork and mechanical parts and construction containing old-tech lubricants and metal parts susceptible to corrosion. At present the few film cameras still being made are largely either 'toy' cameras of the LOMO-type, or uber-expensive Leica M7 model, expensive Nikon F6 (by order and only produced in batches when the order book is full, I believe), and maybe still the last and pretty basic Nikon FM-10.

 

I think Fuji have ceased making their over-priced medium-format, folding rangefinder GF670, which I've heard is also the case for the Voigtländer Bessa R4M rangefinder. The pickings for new are thus very slim, and will undoubtedly cause any film resurgence to be curtailed as prices for the surviving operational 'old' cameras continue to balloon to levels that become unreasonable given their age, subsequent probable reliability problems, and lack of new spare parts. On the other hand it is true that probably all the fully mechanical cameras can have replacement parts machined or even made by hand, but the question there is "will they be worth the effort".

 

Ilford/Harman appears to be backing this to have a future, however, as they are introducing new B&W materials on a reasonably regular basis, with the products clearly favouring the enthusiast/experimental/artistic fields rather than what's left of the profession of photography itself. At first I thought their re-introduction of Ortho film,(in 120 & 35mm sizes) to be a bit odd, but given the resurgence of 'do it yourself' experimenters messing about with large format glass plates and collodion positives/Ambrotypes, this is a far more convenient way to get that green/blue light sensitive only "look" to portraits in particular by using conventional darkroom processing.

 

Large format photography (particularly in B&W) itself never really went away, I think, and there is a reasonably brisk trade going on for what was always a bit of a niche part of photography following Mr Eastman's opening medium and small format film up to the masses after 1888, with used equipment bringing firm prices; but then large format cameras are very simple mechanically and not generally subject to the mishandling and wear and tear their smaller cousins may have suffered. Almost anyone with slight mechanical abilities and somewhat basic tools can maintain and repair the cameras, perhaps the only Achilles heel being the shutters that generally are part of the lenses (although they, too, would have had nowhere near as tough a life as a well-used medium or miniature-format camera).

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