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GB111

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4 hours ago, GB111 said:

Is photography equipment racist?  😕    You tell me..  Apparently this college professor thinks so.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/25/lens/sarah-lewis-racial-bias-photography.html?utm_source=pocket-newtab

 

 

Every tool and furthermore every artistic tool is impregnated of our cultural expression so there is no debate about this. And it is like that for every human activity. Differences and diversities are the wealth of humanity.


A trace of light that survive a little further than the actual moment of flash.

photodanielm.blogspot.com

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The problem with these wild eruptions about racial prejudice, particularly from those who have reached the elevated transmission points of tertiary education professorship in certain societies, is that they offer very little other than being a source of antagonism. The media are quick to hop on the grandstand wherever the race card is played and all that happens as a result of this is that prejudices become more deep seated than before. On both sides. 

 

In my honest opinion, the world has quite literally gone mad and I don't think we can fix it. 

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Sad that Professor Sarah Lewis sees things this way..

 

I can think of plenty of non-white non-Anglo Saxon photographers who are very competent photographers, so they must gotten their racist cameras to behave themselves............

 

Besides for over the last 70 years, 95+% of photographic gear has come from Asia!

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How on earth can a machine be racist, stupid.

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Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-35, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

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42 minutes ago, Mike G said:

How on earth can a machine be racist, stupid.

 

I can understand that metering and emulsion was probably designed with lighter skin in mind, since light skinned people dominated the scene when cameras and emulsions were invented. But is that cause for people like this presumably intelligent professor to stand on a world stage and cry racism? Did anybody suffer terribly as a result of how a camera exposes an image? Trust me, living where I live I know firsthand what real racism is and this is so far off the mark that it beggars belief. 

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So the professor would not be happy with us under exposing in respect of what our exposure meters might say is OK for dark skinned and dark headed subjects least we be racist, where as over exposing fair skinned and fair headed people such as some Sandinavians to better capture their blonde hair and light coloured skin would be presumably O.K? 

 

The PC and other ill informed views & behaviours around the world are becoming increasingly crazy.  Aargh!

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It is untrue that the early cameras and film emulsions were intentional designed to depict black people falsely.

 

However, unconscious bias can, and often does, influence design. Just think of the normal can opener or scissors, or even the standard-issue rifle in the U.S. army,  which are are very difficult for left-handed people to use; the  rifle because the ejected cartridge cases will hit you in the eye if you are shooting with the rifle to your left shoulder.

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Posted (edited)

And as for all you racist foreigners that design left hand drive vehicles to challenge us Anglo Saxons ... well!

 

The world has truly gone mad. Heaven help my grandchildren.

Edited by Clactonian
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Still trying.

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The Japanese drive on the left hand side of the road.  This practice goes back to the days of the Samurai who wore their swords on their left sides and walking on the left side of the road in their narrow streets meant that their swords would not accidentally clash with the words of other Samurai walking in the opposite direction.  I guess this would minimise unintentional  fights erupting if highly prized swords were to be accidentally damaged when the Samurai passed each other.

 

(An aside from Hugh, who drives a Japanese car on the left side of the road!)

 

4 minutes ago, Clactonian said:

And as for all you racist foreigners that design left hand drive vehicles to challenge us Anglo Saxons ... well!

 

The world has truly gone mad. Heaven help my grandchildren.

 

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8 minutes ago, Hugh_3170 said:

The Japanese drive on the left hand side of the road.  This practice goes back to the days of the Samurai who wore their swords on their left sides and walking on the left side of the road in their narrow streets meant that their swords would not accidentally clash with the words of other Samurai walking in the opposite direction.  I guess this would minimise unintentional  fights erupting if highly prized swords were to be accidentally damaged when the Samurai passed each other.

That’s the reason the British have ridden/ driven on the left, for hundreds of years. And by the way that’s why your lady should hold your left arm when 🚶‍♂️ walking so as to keep the right arm free to wield a sword to protect said lady!


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-35, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

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1 hour ago, Mike G said:

That’s the reason the British have ridden/ driven on the left, for hundreds of years. And by the way that’s why your lady should hold your left arm when 🚶‍♂️ walking so as to keep the right arm free to wield a sword to protect said lady!

 

But I'm left handed! Milady shall be forced to defend herself! 😩 

 

The interesting thing about Vivion's comment around bias is that whilst I have had to endure the right handed world all my life, I believe it has strengthened me in immeasurable ways. It would be a waste of my energy to set about trying to change the world to suit me better. Rather I change myself to suit the world better. 

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I'm right handed but left footed; I guess that gas pedals in cars discriminate against me. (OK, enough silliness.)

 

Just to let you guys know that here in the USA this is the kind of stuff University professors write, especially ones from NYC... Endless theories of discrimination, etc. While some are true, many are not, and appear to be used to gain advantage. But since this is a matter of opinion, it is argued back and forth, with no resolution, and the cows still haven't come home.

 

As for her argument, you have to consider her occupation. As I've heard, when you're a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

 

A dark skinned model with a bright white shirt is not the way to go!  That is, unless you're going for a very high contrast look. To me it just looks wrong... it is also hard to place a very white skinned blonde haired model in a pitch dark shirt.  You can also partially compensate by using very diffused light: softbox, etc.

 

 

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The only thing shown/mentioned in the article that would be biased racially is the original Shirley Card which I haven't known about.

 

The light-colored suit of Ms. Lewis at the presentation looks hopelessly overexposed while her skin looks just fine.   The technology of digital cameras as of 2016 should have been able to handle the lighting condition of the depicted scene.   I guess they should have hired another photographer with up-to-date equipments and processing skills.  🙄


"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

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I'm sure she's very competent in her field, but this did little but demonstrate that she knows almost nothing about the science and practice of photography itself and maybe shouldn't take her very misguided, somewhat paranoid interpretation of that deficient knowledge and attempt to twist it into some weird agenda-qualifying piece of pseudo science.

 

Photography  originated in France and England, where the respective inventors were more concerned with simply recording a permanent image than glorifying the European fair complexion, which monochrome emulsions of all types, from the original Daguerreotype and Calotype processes right up to the freshest current roll of HP5 Plus or T-Max 100 have had absolutely zero tonal bias towards any racial type. Or perhaps she's skipping over the fact that something other than digital occupied the 160-odd years of photography prior to electronically generated ones and zeros invading the process, and that much of that earlier period primarily involved monochromatic photography.

 

This wobbly theory of racial "bias" applied to photography as a whole is simply utter, arrant, nonsense.

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Having worked with academics, it is at times amazing how much specious clap trap that some of them can come up with - especially in respect of self promotion and in the run ups to when they put in for grant applications. 

 

All a bit sad, especially for those academics who play matters with a straight bat and don't bend the rules.

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On 30/04/2019 at 20:07, GB111 said:

I'm right handed but left footed;

 

I'm the other way around, left handed but right footed. I think this came about when I was forced to play right wing in football between the ages of 6-12 because the captain of the team was a lefty and he wasn't about to give up his position to a skinny little boy like me. So I played on the right side of the pitch. Similar thing happened when I got my first guitar lessons at age 9. My tutor said he couldn't teach me left-handed, so he forced me to learn how to play right handed. Do you think I can kick a ball with the left foot now or even strum a chord on a leftie guitar? Not a sausage!

 

The human brain is an incredible organ. There's a book I was reading a while ago titled "The Brain That Changes Itself" that examines the ability of the brain to adapt itself to changing conditions. Some fascinating case studies in there. Something I can attest to in support of this science is how the use of "monovision" in my eyesight prescription has largely prevented me from having to wear reading glasses, even now that I am in my 50's. Basically I wear one contact lens for distance in my dominant left eye and nothing in my right eye. What happens is that when I need to use distance vision my left eye kicks in and the right eye performs a secondary role, mainly for depth perception, but my brain disregards the out-of-focus information that eye is receiving. Then when I am reading the opposite thing happens. At first this took a few days to get used to, but it works remarkably well now and while I sometimes struggle a bit with really close focusing in poor light, the solution is good enough for me to do my job as a photographer and not have to faff about with specs. 

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A bit late on the original discussion, but isn't it more about the rules of composition and aren't they based around how our eyes work.  

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