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Dallas

The GAS Conundrum

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42 minutes ago, Anthony said:

That does not sound good.  I hope you find a way to rediscover joy in photography.

 

Safari time in less than 3 months! That always does the trick. :) 

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On 16/04/2019 at 01:49, Dallas said:

In my head I was writing an article explaining exactly that, Luc. 

 

When I upgrade anything now I always ask myself the question: what does it add? If I can't come up with a convincing answer then I know that it is an emotional purchase. There's nothing really wrong with emotional purchases, we all need to satisfy some of those desires, but in my case many of those purchases have ended up hurting me because the money I used on them could have been so much better apportioned on more boring things that I actually needed. They didn't really add any capacity to what I was doing at that time and were largely self-indulgences. 

 

I do believe that I have turned a corner now and this current bout of GAS might well be under control. I got some pricing on the E-M1X and Mk II and there was some shrivelling inside! Yes, I could buy either of them... but what for? Will either purchase result in an improvement in my income as a photographer? No. I will still have the same clients, none of whom give any regard to the tools I use. What do those cameras add to what I am doing? I get more resolution and better stabilisation. Does that matter to me or my clients? Nope. So, buying them would be superfluous to my needs. Would I take them around outside when I am photographing things for myself? Probably not. To be very honest, I can't recall when last I did any photography for myself and when I have done so I found my iPhone 7P to be perfectly fine for any happy snaps and video I need to make. I am even at the point now where the cellphone company is offering me an upgrade to that phone and I am questioning the necessity thereof. The iPhone X holds exactly zero interest for me. I'm afraid I might have become a wet blanket! 

 

I do still love my tech though and a couple of weeks ago I bought the Apple TV4K, which I have absolutely fallen in love with. It has turned my very old 40" Sony Bravia in my second TV room into a better smart TV than the LG Smart TV in the main lounge! The little remote it comes with somehow manages to not only turn on the ATV, but also that ancient Sony too and puts it on the right input. And then turns it off when I send the device to sleep. I have no idea how it does that because the Sony TV relies on an IR remote, but somehow the Apple remote is sending it commands via the HDMI interface. It's quite bizarre. 

 

 

I fully understand your dilemma. Photography is a long passion for you but it is also an earning way of living. As I have modestly experimented these are two very different tasks to conciliate. Doing professional photographic works is intimately related with the needs of your clientele and is castrating many creative aspects of the activity especially compare to your personal photo agenda. At a point you assimilate photo equipment as essential working tools which are far less interesting than it was as used during your photo amateur sessions (in the good sense of the word).
In my days of corporate photography work, I use to work with one specific photo kit (Nikon, Mamiya RZ) and to please myself with a more compact Leica M camera outfit. But over those years I have tried (and loose money) and owned several different camera models. So the GAS phenomena is certainly not new and... not cured!
Your Olympus outfit is still a very competent photo equipment that can be upgraded if you have the motivation to do so but I semm to see a certain "fatigue" on your part of using the O system and a possible desire to refresh your photo enthusiasm with another new system (like I did a few monts ago). Perhaps my only suggestion is in saying that we have only one life so why restraint it with others considerations. Just do what you want (and can afford to do!).
Good luck with your wishfull thinking about photo equipment.

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A trace of light that survive a little further than the actual moment of flash.

photodanielm.blogspot.com

Daniel M on Fliickr

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Very astute observations, Daniel. Thanks for the input. :) 

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Posted (edited)

I have had spells where I felt creatively dead and believed new equipment was the solution. It can be in terms of getting me excited, but if I only take the same kind of pictures I took with the “old” equipment I quickly realize the new equipment is not resolving my issue. Go some place that is familiar to you. Sit there for a while without taking any pictures. Let your mind be at ease vs rushing into snapping frames. At some point you get a clarity and vision for something you see around you. Then you can start snapping frames.

 

For me these “dead” times often are the result of compressing too much into too little time and not giving my mind time to “decompress”. Pausing for a while and letting my vision return ends up getting my creative juices flowing again better than new equipment. After all, it all comes down to ISO, aperture, shutter speed AND composition. No matter what camera you use, those are the basics behind every frame. What differentiates one person’s image from another’s is the creator’s vision and how they execute it through composition and controlling the ISO, shutter and aperture to convey that vision in this visual medium called photography.

Edited by Walter Rowe
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Excellent thoughts, Walter.

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Posted (edited)

I was more or less in the same boat as Dallas. I have used M43 gear almost exclusively for about three/four years and liked it but somehow I missed the artistic possibilities of a larger sensor. I still had a Nikon D5500 DX camera, the output of which I liked but the tiny viewfinder is almost unusable for me. So today I traded some of my barely used Nikon/Olympus and Panasonic gear plus some money for a new Nikon Z6 + Nikkor Z 24-70mm f4. I'll keep and will continue to use most of my M43 gear though for a really lightweight alternative. 

Edited by Luc de Schepper
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I know some think I'm totally nuts, but after almost 20 years of being progressively forced into the financial merry-go-round and endless "updates" and "upgrades" that digital brought to my professional life, retirement has seen me completely reinvent my lifelong love and enjoyment of photography by returning to film, in particular B&W emulsions and the old, battery-less,  fully mature design and construction of mechanical cameras with manual-everything lenses and reliable, predictable, and fully operator-controlled photography. 

 

I needn't even turn a computer on to achieve an end result these days. It's the sort of thing I signed up for as a career in 1971, and which I enjoyed immensely until the intrusion of digital, which I really did try to make work for me aesthetically as well as functionally (under sufferance of client demands), often exploring the cutting edge well before the software writers caught up and released those techniques for general use by the current barrage of cheap, 18-month life cycle digital cameras and more recently the secondment of those functions to almost every consumer's telephone (or "device", as photography is now apparently procured by).

 

So I'll put digital as the worst experience of a career that overall I had enjoyed immensely, and now that I've returned home, as it were, I can use real large and medium format cameras and not "pretend" large format fakery with its lenses, optical performance and sensor size based on a standard of the old, professionally almost inadmissible "amateur" 135 format. A bonus is that I can also use 35mm film cameras and film without being scoffed at these days, as it turns out :). I don't even raise an eyebrow when I mention using Soviet-Bloc cameras from the Cold War era, as I, like many others, have found that their bad reputation is probably a result of anti-Soviet propaganda of the era, rather than anything intrinsically wrong with their design, in particular regarding the lenses. Sure the assembly might be a bit rough, but they are simple and usually relatively easy for a home mechanic to repair and maintain, something that cannot be said for anything digital.

 

I therefore no longer have to argue the merits or otherwise of the formats and equipment that I use, because it is all stuff that was settled well over 50 years ago and so there's nothing to argue about, save protestations from a few brand-name zealots who argue their gear superiority whenever they can - but then that's something that's common with almost any pursuit which has different brand names vying for superiority and the largely amateur or collector warriors who fight the online propaganda wars for those manufacturers.

 

At least I can choose to simply ignore all that nonsense again. :D

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You know the GAS syndrome was already existing during the analog camera era... So even if the present techno nostalgic mania is a nice thing but it doesn't prevent me to observe and use the advantages of the newest digital technology.
Best regards from an humble photographer.


A trace of light that survive a little further than the actual moment of flash.

photodanielm.blogspot.com

Daniel M on Fliickr

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Posted (edited)

.

Dallas, I too shoot HDR photos.  

 

The quickest and easiest way for me to shoot them is to shoot 3, quick, ISO bracketed (+_ 1)  jpg photos.   Why?  Because you can shoot the ISO bracketed photos with the camera handheld because only 1 exposure is needed..

 

As far as I know, only Fuji X cameras have ISO bracketing.   Might be a time saver for you (less post processing) and make for a quicker and easier capture.  

 

The best Fuji X body for this is the  XH1 (because it also has IBIS).

Edited by blurmagic
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