Jump to content
Mike G

For Sale a selection of Fujifilm components

Recommended Posts

The following bits and pieces are for sale at a very attractive price. This is the last of my Fuji bits and bobs! 

 

The attractive price is fixed at £100 +  £15 P&P within the UK or the EU via PayPal

 

4 x Fujifilm NP-W126S batteries
2 x Fujifilm square metal lens hoods(16,23)
1 x JJC square metal lenshood (23)
ExPro travel charger for NP-W126s
ExPro double charger for NP-W126s
Hejnar Arca Swiss alternative foot for 50-140mm lens
2 x X-T1/X-T2 eyecups
Fujifilm RR-90 remote cable shutter release
1 copy Dan Bailey’s X Series Ultimate book.

 

I’m cutting my final ties to Fujifilm


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This sale is now cancelled!


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mike, I am curious as to what triggered your move from the Fuji APS-C sized cameras to M43?  Was it weight considerations or maybe other interests such as better video capabilities? Cheers, Hugh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hugh, what prompted me was lock ups, freezes and sudden factory resets for no reason of my X-T2 + X-H1. Plus the lack of response or acknowledgement from Fuji regarding these problems. Also the way the lenses were inconsistent in the way the lens controls such as aperture ring inconsistent feel! Higher battery performance of the Panasonic 

And so I splashed out on a Lumix G9 + PL 12-60mm lens. To my eyes the G9 in the hand beat the X-H1 hands down, and I don’t see any difference in the IQ. 

I don’t do video at all, and there are a number of little points such as a superior IBIS functions and a viewfinder to die for. Also I prefer the 4*3 format, and the size of the optics is generally smaller although not necessarily cheaper. Focusing is equally as quick as Fuji cameras and more versatile in the AF options available!

The bits and pieces were the last knockings of my Fuji gear, and all I have left now are the 16mm + 23mm Fuji square metal lens hoods!

YMMV

  • Like 1

Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Mike - I was curious.  Interesting about the freezes and re-sets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hugh, my X-T2 went to 

Fuji support UK and had the main power board and the top plate replace, the second time I switched it on the bloody camera froze and I had to take out the battery and put it back in to get the camera to switch on! It was PXed for an X-H1, and that brand new camera less than a week old reset to factory settings several times on the first day of my holiday, enough was enough.

Though it as shame as I liked the X-H1, but since then the LUMIX G9 has stolen my heart. 💓 


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I don't find it annoying enough to ditch the whole system, I've recently had several instances of my X-T2 refusing to turn on unless I remove and replace the battery (which takes no longer than removing and fitting an SD card, so isn't a real problem like the thing not working at all or resetting unexpectedly). The camera is now several years old, of course, as are the batteries, but at this stage I'm now retired and therefore I will not be replacing any of my Fuji digital gear. I've returned to medium format B&W film for my photographic pursuits - no batteries, no redundancies, and the pleasure of being fully in charge of both the camera and its workings and the film and its processing. No computers to upgrade, no batteries sd cards to update, excellent lenses that can be had for anything from under $50 to under $350, (and not high hundreds to several thousands of $$$), and cameras that can actually be disassembled and serviced without a degree in computer electronics.

 

When the X-T2 expires I'll sell the lenses, and for what little digital photography I do I'll use my Sigma sd Quattro H instead as its technical design and operation better suits the sort of photographic subject matter I enjoy. With a new L mount Sigma mirrorless 135 camera already confirmed by Sigma, I'll probably buy it and a couple of appropriate lenses (which are to be made by Sigma, Leica and Panasonic/Leica), but that's as far as I'll go with digital. The whole process sucks big time if your medium is B&W, always has, always will. It produces nothing like the results obtainable with B&W film printed on B&W photographic paper, particularly when compared with what digital produces when printed on even the latest tech inkjet printers.

 

It's not something that can be demonstrated by showing digitised results compressed and displayed on a monitor, either; suffice to say that yesterday, in response to an inkjet print of a negative I took a few days ago I was asked for a couple of extra prints. As I'm still trying out my remaining stocks photographic paper I ceased to use in the early '00's (so far all of it has performed exactly as expected with no visible deterioration or fogging), I thought a comparative print on photographic paper compared with the 100MP copied negative file's print on a near-new Epson SC P800 printer. The photographic print ate the digital print for breakfast and then spat it out in disdain, so much better was it than its "modern" equivalent.

 

So basically, I'm done with digital garbage when it comes to B&W. We've been sold a crock by the computer and electronics industries, and the well developed (pun not intended) old tech B&W nearly died as a result. The recurrent resurgence in its use is testament that I'm not the only one who feels this way; it's a pity that it will only ever be a small side-kick to the iPhonography that has consumed photography these days, and that decent medium format film cameras will probably never be built again (even though some digital medium format cameras are capable of taking film backs, their initial cost makes that an unlikely prime use), so we are stuck with the second-hand market. Testament to the old gear is that this stuff, generally all now 30-40 or more years old, still works as it should with an increasing range of freshly produced films. I doubt very much that anybody in the future will ever make such a claim as to the present digital garbage, which is practically all destined for landfill or component recycling within a decade or so.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Alan7140
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just had to send off my original Olympus E-M1 to the repair facility (in Portugal!). I was on a shoot a week or two ago and as I was about to take a burst of bracketed shots the camera just stopped working. The shutter was stuck. These modern digital cameras are temporary things and this is why I find it so amusing that "photographers" on forums like DPreview and various other platforms get so excited about devices that might only last 5 years (if they're lucky).

 

My philosophy now when it comes to gear is to wait for the rush to subside and then buy the cameras that are going out of style or have been relegated to the back-burners by enthusiastic early adopters of whatever is new. I'm eagerly awaiting the announcement of the E-M1X tomorrow and then I will pounce on barely used E-M1 Mk II bodies that will suddenly become passé to their owners. :) 

 

As long as you know what you're buying it for, it's all good. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buying around halfway into a product lifecycle often brings rewards - by that stage the prices have normalised and the bugs have hopefully been ironed out.  I used to use this approach in relation to the acquisition of mainframe database software years ago.  Up until then we were effectively just debugging crappy software for vendors by being early adopters - pioneers are of course the ones that get the arrows in the back!

 

I have the MkI and MkII OMD E-M1 cameras.  I will not be getting the E-M1X  -  it is just as big a brick to lug around as a FX/135 format Nikon DSLR.  Totally outside what the spirit of the  M43 small format camera is about in my humble opinion.

 

 

21 minutes ago, Dallas said:

I've just had to send off my original Olympus E-M1 to the repair facility (in Portugal!). I was on a shoot a week or two ago and as I was about to take a burst of bracketed shots the camera just stopped working. The shutter was stuck. These modern digital cameras are temporary things and this is why I find it so amusing that "photographers" on forums like DPreview and various other platforms get so excited about devices that might only last 5 years (if they're lucky).

 

My philosophy now when it comes to gear is to wait for the rush to subside and then buy the cameras that are going out of style or have been relegated to the back-burners by enthusiastic early adopters of whatever is new. I'm eagerly awaiting the announcement of the E-M1X tomorrow and then I will pounce on barely used E-M1 Mk II bodies that will suddenly become passé to their owners. :) 

 

As long as you know what you're buying it for, it's all good. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hugh, I agree but I have the willpower of a cabbage. 🤗


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't anticipate buying new gear. In fact, I may sell my Fuji stuff and not replace it.

 

I have not used it since I got the Leica Q.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vivion is the Leica Q a fixed lens jobbie?


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes Mike - the lens is a 28 mm f./1.7, with a "full-frame" sensor.

 

But the IQ is so good that cropping to 35 mm or 50 mm (which can even be done in-camera) still gives images suitable for printing up to A3 size.

 

I worried that the 28 mm FOV would be a restrictive liability, but this has not been the case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Alan7140 said:

.......and cameras that can actually be disassembled and serviced without a degree in computer electronics.

These days it can be more of a case of things can never be disassembled and serviced at all, by anyone.

 

 

4 hours ago, Dallas said:

These modern digital cameras are temporary things and this is why I find it so amusing that "photographers" on forums like DPreview and various other platforms get so excited about devices that might only last 5 years (if they're lucky).

 

 

I've been very lucky then, as I've ran most of my cameras beyond 5 years.😀

 

4 hours ago, Dallas said:

 

My philosophy now when it comes to gear is to wait for the rush to subside and then buy the cameras that are going out of style or have been relegated to the back-burners by enthusiastic early adopters of whatever is new. I'm eagerly awaiting the announcement of the E-M1X tomorrow and then I will pounce on barely used E-M1 Mk II bodies that will suddenly become passé to their owners. :) 

 

I've not took the risk of buying second hand, but agree with not rushing out as soon as things are announced.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/01/2019 at 14:38, Hugh_3170 said:

Buying around halfway into a product lifecycle often brings rewards - by that stage the prices have normalised and the bugs have hopefully been ironed out.

 

I fully agree with you, Hugh.  I just did the same thing by selling my D750 kit for Fuji E-X3 with 23/2.0 kit.

 

My favorite focal length has always been the standard, but I have had to go through three samples of 35/2.0 until I am satisfied with the performance.

 

Mike, I was surprised to know you switched to m4/3.  :D  I used to use some Panasonic cameras and liked them.  Hope you enjoy your new system!

Edited by Akira
  • Like 1

"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Akira. 🤗


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Akira said:

 

I fully agree with you, Hugh.  I just did the same thing by selling my D750 kit for Fuji E-X3 with 23/2.0 kit.

 

 

Good choice!😀  I’ve been shooting with an X-E3 for a few months now too.  I’m quite impressed with it and the Fuji lenses.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, crowecg said:

 

Good choice!😀  I’ve been shooting with an X-E3 for a few months now too.  I’m quite impressed with it and the Fuji lenses.

 

Thank you Chris.  So far, I'm happy with the decision!


"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike, FWIW, the DMW-BLC12 battery for GX8 is the same as BP-51 for some Sigma cameras.  BP-51 is way cheaper than BLC12, only a little more expensive and more reliable than any off-brand compatible batteries.  I owned GX8 previously and still have a BP-51 lying around.

Edited by Akira
  • Like 1

"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By visiting this website you are agreeing to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy & Guidelines.