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Dallas

What Did I learn In 2018?

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It’s an interesting question, fully deserving of an honest answer since this has been by far the busiest year of my 10 year long stint as a freelance photographer.

 

The first thing I learned is that when you have a satisfied customer your enthusiasm to satisfy them even more intensifies. The better you are at producing what they need to fulfil their mission, the likelier they are to keep coming back to you and also referring you to others. This leads you to find new ways to impress them at the next incidence, even if it’s just an incremental change from before.

 

For instance, if I am dealing with a client who needs a particular product photographed for an online store, I won’t just give them what they asked for. I’ll give them a little bit extra, even if it takes longer and they don’t use it. This could be a slightly different angle or a variety of shots they hadn’t even considered. By giving them a little extra they see that they are not just dealing with a guy who only cares about making a sale, but about a guy who is taking an interest in their success too. Happy client = happy photographer.

 

The second thing I learned is that I don’t need a new camera when the old ones are still working fine and show no signs of dying. If I was to give in to the desire to get the newest camera I would only be fooling myself that it would make any difference to the images I make. Unless…

 

…that camera was so revolutionary that it would make my job much easier.

 

How so? Well, at the moment the bulk of my work is real estate for one particular estate agency. I started doing work for them in March this year and since then I have shot over 250 homes for them. The only change in my equipment has been a single lens acquisition (written about here). Everything else is still the same. Olympus E-M1 body with L-plate and that old Sunwayfoto carbon fibre tripod I got several years ago.

 

The new lens helped a lot with flare, but the thing that made my job move from taking on average 1 hour per listing to under 20 minutes was learning how to use my camera and software more effectively. I found out through practice that I get better HDR results from 3 frames than I do from 5 or more. Sounds crazy but it’s absolutely true. Of the three different HDR engines I have been using (Lightroom, Enfuse and Aurora) all of them do better with fewer frames. Adding more frames just takes longer, especially when you’re shooting darker spaces. Sometimes a dimly lit room would require up to 30 seconds of exposure for the super bright frame, but when I put that frame into the HDR process, the results became less realistic (and realistic HDR is what I am after). 3 frames works better than 5 or more. Bank it.

 

So, back on the question of getting a better camera. If I could find one that does a better job of HDR in-camera, that might be a good reason to invest in it. Thus far in my investigations for such an animal ,the only candidate appears to be the Sony A7 or A6500 series which I have seen doing pretty amazing in-camera HDR jpgs on a social media group I joined (just to look, not participate, mind). However, I wouldn’t buy the Sony for reasons related to my dislike for that company, so something else would have to come along from a maker I could trust.

 

I looked (and am still looking) at the Sigma SD Quattro series for my property work. There is something about the Foveon sensor IQ of those cameras that really hits all the receptors in my brain. Not readily available here where I live, but the importers can bring one in for me. The price is keen and the lens selection from Sigma is definitely enticing. The downsides are that the camera is a bit clunky to use according to some reviewers, plus the battery life is not great. Also on the downside is that there is no articulating screen which is an absolute life saver for RE work. Using the Sigma on RE would certainly slow me down which in this game is not a good thing. I want a camera to speed up my process so that I can cover more properties in a day, not go the other way.

 

That said, I don’t intend to restrict my work to only RE. My aim is to get stuck into the hospitality market because it overlaps extremely well with my safari planning and marketing ambitions. The Sigma would definitely be a camera worth considering for that type of work. Shooting for hotels is very different than shooting for estate agents. So why not look at some of the other big names like Canon and Nikon you might be asking?

 

Good question.

 

Canon and Nikon both brought out serious mirrorless cameras this year. I wouldn’t consider using a DSLR again so those new mirrorless models did briefly catch my interest. However, that interest was soon quelled when I saw the local pricing. Ouch. Sorry. Thanks, but no thanks. If I was getting commissioned to shoot for major hospitality outlets every week then yes, it might make sense from an eco-system point of view (think availability of tilt shift lenses), but right now it’s a lot of money spent with a non-commensurate return. Not once in the decade of being a freelancer has a single client asked me what equipment I shoot with, so why spend more when spending more doesn’t translate into earning more? The Canon and Nikon mirrorless systems therefore remain a non-starter for me.

 

The next thing I learned is that while gear is necessary, you have to separate the emotion from it and look at obtaining it pragmatically. There comes a point in your life as a photographer when the realisation of just how much folly and irrational thinking is tied up in gear acquisition leads you to question every next purchase. I think I finally reached that point of realisation sometime this year. Right now I am wrestling with the notion of buying into the Godox portable lighting system. I already have two great little Olympus speedlights and three powerful a/c powered strobes, but the advent of lithium battery powered lighting opens up a whole other playing field, especially in property photography where working with a/c strobes and underpowered speedlights is more of a hindrance than a benefit. I’m about 90% sure that I need to buy at least one Godox AD200 unit before the start of 2019. The 10% that isn’t convinced is telling me that I should rather spend the money on an Apple 27” monitor to match the other 2 currently on my desk. That monitor sure would be awesome to have and look at, but it doesn’t add anything to my quiver of arrows as a producer. The Godox AD200 does. Do I want to follow folly or common sense?

 

On a very personal and non photographic note, something else I learned this year is that there are people out there in the world who are irredeemably evil and who will allow their avarice to wreck havoc in the lives of those of us who unwittingly fall into their web of deceit. But the havoc only happens if we let these evil ones get the better of us after they have robbed us. I had something very bad happen to me this year that could have altered the course of my life in a seriously negative trajectory. Trust me when I say that that it was very, very bad. However, this thing that happened changed me in a profoundly positive manner and I can literally feel myself emerging from the gloom that had initially beset me after its occurrence. I’m awake. I feel truly awake for the first time in my life. Maybe the sucker punch was what I needed to cause this awakening to happen? What this episode taught me is that I don’t have to let poor circumstances or affairs dictate tomorrow to me. Yesterday I can do nothing about, but today is mostly in my hands and the things I do today can shape the outcome of tomorrow. That’s worth living for. I read somewhere recently that you’re only a loser when you give up trying. Amen to that.

 

As we steadily approach the end of 2018 I would just like to sincerely thank those of you who are still visiting and posting on Fotozones. It’s still here and the message is still the same; we share what we do for the love of photography. Tell me about what you learned in 2018. 

 

I hope that you have a very blessed Christmas and Hannukah this festive season. 2019 will see me leading my first safari on my own and it promises to be the start of many more to come, which I will most definitely be telling you about on this website, so don’t unsubscribe!

 

Take care everybody!

 

Dallas

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A very interesting read Dallas, sorry to hear that the evil doers tried to get at you, but good that you came out stronger than before!

You say that a new camera is not needed, but have you seen the new EM-1X, which might be very suitable for your safaris?

I admire your resistance to GAS, but I’m sure you will succumb eventually!

Rock on matey

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Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

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Your stoic resistance to GAS is understandable as the breadwinner, and I can recall similar self restraint with my family responsibilities over the years. Now well past retirement age and with some disposable income to play with I am able to give into my craving from time to time (well quite often actually) but whilst still maintaining some modicum of restraint. I know that I actually appreciate my equipment more now, knowing that I have had to be patient over the years and that nothing is going to suffer as a consequence of my purchases.

 

So what did I learn photographically this year? A couple of things both relating to club photography.

 

Firstly that the internal club competition league is a farce and therefore to jump ship, stop trying to please judges and their random scoring methods, and to take and print photographs that actually please me. I still participate in the competitions but on my terms and not others.

 

Secondly to avoid the growing trend amongst club photographers of using 'bought' photographs. More and more professional photographers are now leading courses, either day shoots or over several days (yes a bit like your safaris), taking amateurs to established view points or locations, so we are seeing more and more of the same images all set-up by the professional. The amateur just presses the shutter and his tripod is in the same holes left by the previous photographer. 

The same problem exists with studio nights where the lighting is set up by the professional, the model is posed and the amateur takes his/her turn to press the shutter.

As part of the learning process this may be fine but for heavens sake stop trying to pass the resulting images off as your own work.

 

Oh and as a third point, to burn the soapbox on which I'm frequently to be found standing!

 

Seasonal greetings to you Dallas and to all our colleagues on Fotozones.

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Still trying.

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1 hour ago, Mike G said:

A very interesting read Dallas, sorry to hear that the evil doers tried to get at you, but good that you came out stronger than before!

You say that a new camera is not needed, but have you seen the new EM-1X, which might be very suitable for your safaris?

I admire your resistance to GAS, but I’m sure you will succumb eventually!

Rock on matey

 

Thanks Mike. I have heard about the E-M-1X but I have also heard that it will cost twice the price of a Mk II, which is going to mean that it needs to be that revolutionary camera I spoke about. I have nothing official on it, but I suspect that this might be the one that does handheld sensor shift for enormous megapixel results. If they develop a 24MP MFT sensor that shifts to produce a near 100MP image with the same kind of quality we can expect from current sensors, oh boy... Imagine they do it with a Foveon sensor. 😮

 

56 minutes ago, Clactonian said:

Your stoic resistance to GAS is understandable as the breadwinner, and I can recall similar self restraint with my family responsibilities over the years. Now well past retirement age and with some disposable income to play with I am able to give into my craving from time to time (well quite often actually) but whilst still maintaining some modicum of restraint. I know that I actually appreciate my equipment more now, knowing that I have had to be patient over the years and that nothing is going to suffer as a consequence of my purchases.

 

So what did I learn photographically this year? A couple of things both relating to club photography.

 

Firstly that the internal club competition league is a farce and therefore to jump ship, stop trying to please judges and their random scoring methods, and to take and print photographs that actually please me. I still participate in the competitions but on my terms and not others.

 

Secondly to avoid the growing trend amongst club photographers of using 'bought' photographs. More and more professional photographers are now leading courses, either day shoots or over several days (yes a bit like your safaris), taking amateurs to established view points or locations, so we are seeing more and more of the same images all set-up by the professional. The amateur just presses the shutter and his tripod is in the same holes left by the previous photographer. 

The same problem exists with studio nights where the lighting is set up by the professional, the model is posed and the amateur takes his/her turn to press the shutter.

As part of the learning process this may be fine but for heavens sake stop trying to pass the resulting images off as your own work.

 

Oh and as a third point, to burn the soapbox on which I'm frequently to be found standing!

 

Seasonal greetings to you Dallas and to all our colleagues on Fotozones.

 

Thanks! Yes, I see a lot of that replicated stuff here too, especially with wedding photographers which drives me nuts because they literally cannot "see" anything other than the manufactured shots their instructors have showed them how to take. Nothing original, ever. The one thing I have never done is sell my safaris as workshops or learning events. They are really just get-togethers with like minded souls who have a strong appreciation for nature and photographing it with others who enjoy the same things. I'm always on hand to help anybody who is not an experienced photographer get better shots, but that's entirely secondary to the purpose of going on the safari. The best part about joining one of my trips is that you will not pay any more than you would if you booked it yourself. This is not something that any of the bigger names in wildlife photo safaris can offer - they have to sell them as workshops to justify their own costs of joining (which can be excessive, especially if they are not based here). I am going to be branching into two distinctively different kinds of safari in the near future. One will be aimed at the more affordable market and the other at the exclusive, charter market (I am making inroads with chartering small planes to get to specific destinations - I have great contacts in the industry!). Stay tuned for more info in 2019. 

 

On gear folly? Absolutely, if you can afford to spend money on something that gives you pleasure without impacting on other areas of your life, then you should spend it. This is why the 3rd Apple monitor idea is flaming hot for me right now! I don't need it. I want it. :D 

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You will note that I didn’t say it was going to be the cheap option!

Mike, that is the reason I’ve never joined a photo club! It used to be that the judging to be biased towards the club elders or so I’m told. Plus I’m really not a clubby person!


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

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3 hours ago, Dallas said:

 

Thanks Mike. I have heard about the E-M-1X but I have also heard that it will cost twice the price of a Mk II, which is going to mean that it needs to be that revolutionary camera I spoke about. I have nothing official on it, but I suspect that this might be the one that does handheld sensor shift for enormous megapixel results. If they develop a 24MP MFT sensor that shifts to produce a near 100MP image with the same kind of quality we can expect from current sensors, oh boy... Imagine they do it with a Foveon sensor. 😮

 

 

Thanks! Yes, I see a lot of that replicated stuff here too, especially with wedding photographers which drives me nuts because they literally cannot "see" anything other than the manufactured shots their instructors have showed them how to take. Nothing original, ever. The one thing I have never done is sell my safaris as workshops or learning events. They are really just get-togethers with like minded souls who have a strong appreciation for nature and photographing it with others who enjoy the same things. I'm always on hand to help anybody who is not an experienced photographer get better shots, but that's entirely secondary to the purpose of going on the safari. The best part about joining one of my trips is that you will not pay any more than you would if you booked it yourself. This is not something that any of the bigger names in wildlife photo safaris can offer - they have to sell them as workshops to justify their own costs of joining (which can be excessive, especially if they are not based here). I am going to be branching into two distinctively different kinds of safari in the near future. One will be aimed at the more affordable market and the other at the exclusive, charter market (I am making inroads with chartering small planes to get to specific destinations - I have great contacts in the industry!). Stay tuned for more info in 2019. 

 

On gear folly? Absolutely, if you can afford to spend money on something that gives you pleasure without impacting on other areas of your life, then you should spend it. This is why the 3rd Apple monitor idea is flaming hot for me right now! I don't need it. I want it. :D 

Just to be clear Dallas, I'm not knocking the professionals that run the courses. They are all trying to earn a living. It's the amateurs that attend those courses and then parade their photographs as original masterpieces when they are nothing of the sort.


Still trying.

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3 hours ago, Mike G said:

You will note that I didn’t say it was going to be the cheap option!

Mike, that is the reason I’ve never joined a photo club! It used to be that the judging to be biased towards the club elders or so I’m told. Plus I’m really not a clubby person!

Despite my beef Mike, I actually enjoy camera clubs, and belong to two. 

I've met some good friends and one or two of us go on interesting photographic jaunts occasionally. We have also had some really interesting speakers.

Whatever, it get's me out of the house!

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Still trying.

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15 hours ago, Dallas said:

 

I looked (and am still looking) at the Sigma SD Quattro series for my property work. There is something about the Foveon sensor IQ of those cameras that really hits all the receptors in my brain. Not readily available here where I live, but the importers can bring one in for me. The price is keen and the lens selection from Sigma is definitely enticing. The downsides are that the camera is a bit clunky to use according to some reviewers, plus the battery life is not great. Also on the downside is that there is no articulating screen which is an absolute life saver for RE work. Using the Sigma on RE would certainly slow me down which in this game is not a good thing. I want a camera to speed up my process so that I can cover more properties in a day, not go the other way.

 

That said, I don’t intend to restrict my work to only RE. My aim is to get stuck into the hospitality market because it overlaps extremely well with my safari planning and marketing ambitions. The Sigma would definitely be a camera worth considering for that type of work. Shooting for hotels is very different than shooting for estate agents.

 

Dallas

 

I'm not sure how well suited to RE the Sigma Quattro would be as that's not something I've used it for, but if you want something that is an absolute killer in the detail and in-camera HDR, I can't think of anything around that could hold a candle to it when used in SFD mode. The downside is that you are tied to Sigma's Photo Pro software to process the Foveon raw files,  and SPP is slow and clunky and not well refined in its controls; however if used taking shots  in similar situations and lighting conditions, you can save your best setting as a preset and just apply that to everything and let it rumble away while doing something else. The SFD mode (super fine detail) is more than just an HDR setting which works over six stops/seven stops (the 3XI files it saves are huge - 400+MB - and contain all seven shots which can be selectively deleted from the stack if desired) and are combined in a way that results in not only controllable HDR results but absolutely eliminates noise. Once processed, however, the files of my sd Q-H  are a more manageable 125-odd MB.

The end result I get with my sd Quattro-H in SFD mode is easily comparable in IQ to any medium format digital I've seen to date, and the ridiculously low price of the camera makes it an easy choice if finances aren't endless. The only reliability question around the camera is its alleged propensity to over-heat, which results in an automatic shut--down until it cools off, however that's only happened once to me in the nearly two years I've had the thing, so I can't say it has been a problem as far as I'm concerned. At the moment with a Hartblei shift rotator and Zeiss Jena P6 2,8/120 lens it is spending most of its time as a 120 neg "scanner", stitching nine or ten segments to result in ~100MP images, which simply eat anything my Epson V700 Photo struggles to produce.

 

Used in the context of RE, I'd imagine a sd-Q or Q-H would be an addition to your Olympus rather than a replacement; I'd imagine you'd still do the major part of the work on the Oly, but for fold-out brochures or large feature shots the quality of Sigma SFD shots would be a definite asvantage.

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Thanks Alan. Apparently the new SD Quattros can shoot in DNG, so processing in Lightroom is possible. I haven't been able to dig up any info on what that does to quality though. Do you have this one? I see the non H version is now only $699 for the body only. Crazy cheap for such a powerful imaging device! 

 

I don't know if I would want to use it for RE though, because of the fast turnaround, low cost nature of that work, but for hospitality clients where the payday is greater and the time spent on editing is equally so, it's most definitely something to consider. I don't know which of the Sigma lenses would be best for it. Maybe the 12-24mm?? 

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3 hours ago, Dallas said:

Thanks Alan. Apparently the new SD Quattros can shoot in DNG, so processing in Lightroom is possible. I haven't been able to dig up any info on what that does to quality though. Do you have this one? I see the non H version is now only $699 for the body only. Crazy cheap for such a powerful imaging device! 

 

I don't know if I would want to use it for RE though, because of the fast turnaround, low cost nature of that work, but for hospitality clients where the payday is greater and the time spent on editing is equally so, it's most definitely something to consider. I don't know which of the Sigma lenses would be best for it. Maybe the 12-24mm?? 

 

 

Yes, that's the one I have. I believe the DNG files are 12-bit rather than 14-bit (I may be wrong there), but I'm certain that the SFD mode will not output in DNG. In fact it goes so far as to set the camera at 100 ISO as well, so altogether it's strictly a Sigma Photo Pro software thing. The results, however, are nothing short of amazing once you get the hang of the processing settings, albeit like any multiple-exposure combining thing it is susceptible to subject movement. I got the H version as I already had the DP1 & DP2 16MP cameras, and figured the H's 25MP would make a more justifiable difference to that 16MP compared with the standard 19.6MP.

 

You might hang off for a bit as Sigma, Panasonic and Leica are collaborating on the new L mount cameras & lenses, and Sigma are developing a new 36x24 sensor to suit that lens mount. They appear to be taking the hybrid route even further away from the original Foveon so I'm not suggesting to hang out for that; but when and if it is announced the price of the sd Quattros, both standard and H are bound to drop a lot if Sigma's past modus operandi is to be any guide.

 

I paid full ticket for my Quattro-H when it was released and haven't regretted that for one moment. Despite its somewhat clunky operation and limited features, used sensibly it can produce results you'd swear were impossible, particularly when using that SFD function.

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A Happy Christmas to all good souls here.

 

I echo what has been said about photo tours and clubs. The last thing I need when I am out with a camera is someone telling me what and how to shoot. Still less do I need club members bending my ear about gear and/or playing club politics.

As one of the Marx brothers said, I would not join any club that would accept me as a member. It’s a wonder I’m still here ...

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3 hours ago, Alan7140 said:

 

 

Yes, that's the one I have. I believe the DNG files are 12-bit rather than 14-bit (I may be wrong there), but I'm certain that the SFD mode will not output in DNG. In fact it goes so far as to set the camera at 100 ISO as well, so altogether it's strictly a Sigma Photo Pro software thing. The results, however, are nothing short of amazing once you get the hang of the processing settings, albeit like any multiple-exposure combining thing it is susceptible to subject movement. I got the H version as I already had the DP1 & DP2 16MP cameras, and figured the H's 25MP would make a more justifiable difference to that 16MP compared with the standard 19.6MP.

 

You might hang off for a bit as Sigma, Panasonic and Leica are collaborating on the new L mount cameras & lenses, and Sigma are developing a new 36x24 sensor to suit that lens mount. They appear to be taking the hybrid route even further away from the original Foveon so I'm not suggesting to hang out for that; but when and if it is announced the price of the sd Quattros, both standard and H are bound to drop a lot if Sigma's past modus operandi is to be any guide.

 

I paid full ticket for my Quattro-H when it was released and haven't regretted that for one moment. Despite its somewhat clunky operation and limited features, used sensibly it can produce results you'd swear were impossible, particularly when using that SFD function.

 

Good advice on holding off should this other hybrid animal come to fruition (still baffles me why the world is so strung out on this 35x24mm format though). I am quite close to the Sigma importers here in SA, going back to my days as a Nikon shooter when they very kindly supplied me with loads of lenses for reviews and testing, so I will definitely check with them on possibly getting an SD-Q H in for me at run off pricing. It will be worth having even if I have to use their software to make best use of it. Lots of really good Sigma glass around for it too. 

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48 minutes ago, Dallas said:

 

Good advice on holding off should this other hybrid animal come to fruition (still baffles me why the world is so strung out on this 35x24mm format though). I am quite close to the Sigma importers here in SA, going back to my days as a Nikon shooter when they very kindly supplied me with loads of lenses for reviews and testing, so I will definitely check with them on possibly getting an SD-Q H in for me at run off pricing. It will be worth having even if I have to use their software to make best use of it. Lots of really good Sigma glass around for it too. 

 

I don't think Sigma was an instigator of the 36x24 frame decision - Leica is the driving force behind this L mount thing, and it'll give Sigma a line into supplying glass to Leica owners which will be new, upmarket territory for Sigma's lenses, so the frame size of their new camera seems to be one that came with the partnership terms and conditions as much as anything.

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Well, first of all, I wish you folks on FZ a Merry Christmas and of course a very happy 2019.

 

Very interesting reads from people who know what they talk about, is what I seek in this 'club'. And I read a lot of that the last 10½ years. Thanks to you all!

I learned this last year that I needed to go away from a brand-driven club, where only One Brand is holy, anything else is inferior.

Surely I took part in some club-shooting outings, where I met nice people, who were friendly enough to point out what I already knew. (I have had a camera since the early 60's, and learned shooting the hard way)

I retired the older DSLR(s) and some heavy glass, for I am closing in on my own retirement too, and it was getting to heavy to lug around for me.

So nowadays I take my own FZ with me, the FZ1000 (Panasonic) and it freed me completely!  I'm not a pro, but shoot about 5000 pics a year. Most of them end up on a hard-disk, but I learned that my hardcover albums are worth to be seen. Or so the family says. :-)

Thanks for having me lurking around!

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Panasonic FZ1000 - Nikon gear Thor's Photo Space

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Thor,

I wish you would post more often. I would love to see your photos.

I have visited the aviation museum in Lelystad.

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One change for me for 2018 was moving to a camera with more traditional knobs and dials, which has slowed me down a bit, but in photography that is generally a good thing as I'm looking and thinking more carefully.  I think there has been some improvement because of this.

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8 hours ago, thor55 said:

Well, first of all, I wish you folks on FZ a Merry Christmas and of course a very happy 2019.

 

Very interesting reads from people who know what they talk about, is what I seek in this 'club'. And I read a lot of that the last 10½ years. Thanks to you all!

I learned this last year that I needed to go away from a brand-driven club, where only One Brand is holy, anything else is inferior.

Surely I took part in some club-shooting outings, where I met nice people, who were friendly enough to point out what I already knew. (I have had a camera since the early 60's, and learned shooting the hard way)

I retired the older DSLR(s) and some heavy glass, for I am closing in on my own retirement too, and it was getting to heavy to lug around for me.

So nowadays I take my own FZ with me, the FZ1000 (Panasonic) and it freed me completely!  I'm not a pro, but shoot about 5000 pics a year. Most of them end up on a hard-disk, but I learned that my hardcover albums are worth to be seen. Or so the family says. 🙂

Thanks for having me lurking around!

 

Thanks for being a member, Gerhard, and yes, please post more! Everyone is welcome to use Fotozones as a "gentlemen of photography" meeting place. :) 

 

Moving away from being a brand slave was the best thing I think I have done in photography, even though it has cost me a lot. These days I am only interested in results. I don't particularly care what I use to get them. 

 

And in other news, it seems that blessings from above are finding me. I have been commissioned to photograph a seriously expensive home on Saturday by none other than the New York Times for a feature in their house hunting magazine! If I add the selling prices of every house I have shot in December, they don't add up to the asking price for this one place. To say that I am feeling a bit awestruck would be very much understated. 😮

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Well done you matey! I’m sure you will do it justice.

what you manage to get out of the diminutive mu-43 chip is amazing, be super to see a taste of your results, hopefully.

 

 

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Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

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Thank you, Mike. I am just hoping for good weather because it's been really up and down this month. It's such an incredible photo opportunity, I don't want it to be messed up with gloomy pics. Regardless, I will be able to say that I have shot for the NYT, which is pretty amazing in its own right. :) 

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Great news Dallas and well earned.  Good luck with the shoot - we will all pray for good weather for you on the day!  :) 

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