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From Wikipedia

 

The Peugeot 203 is the first post-war model of the French car brand Peugeot . Between 1949, production end of the 202 , and 1954, launch of the 403 , it was Peugeot's only model.

It was a strikingly modern, streamlined car, the first Peugeot with self-supporting construction. The 1290 cc 4 cylinder «super-carré» engine that delivered 42 hp was also newly designed. 

In a later version increased to 45 hp, with which a top speed of 120 km / h could be achieved. Other innovations were the stub shaft steering , the synchronized four-speed gearbox and independent wheel suspension.

 

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Edited by Luc de Schepper
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Down here in the sub-tropics we have a saying: never buy a French car. :D 

 

 

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😀 at least this one still survives for photo opportunities. I have had the least mechanical and electronic problems with Japanese cars (Honda and Mazda). Having said that, our next car is designed in Sweden, financed by Chinese money and made in Belgium. Fingers crossed!

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Toyota, VW and Ford are the biggest sellers here in SA. I've never owned a Toyota, but recently we had one (Etios) as a rental car for a week after I (ahem) reversed my wife's car into the closing driveway gate. The Etios wasn't too bad, a bit tinny, but these days I think the lighter they are the cheaper they run and with the price of fuel here now at the highest it has ever been, that's a must.

 

I'm actually looking into getting something else for myself in the next 6 months and have been considering a Hyundai i20 or a Ford Ecosport. But then the sensible part of me says I should just keep driving the old Ford mini pickup van I have had since 2012 (which is now paid off) and is as reliable as the daily sunrise. 

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Luc, nice to see the old 203 in a still usable state.  Peugot made quite a name for themselves here in the Australain Redex endurance races in the 1950s.

 

I have never been brave enough to buy a European car.  Many here are plagued with electrical and overheating problems and most have poor support networks.  Saw a brand new Range Rover and its Caravan being flat decked to the nearest capital city some 500+km away for repairs;  the flat decking set the guy back $5k!  The nearest Toyota dealership however (stealership?) was only 0.5km away - if that.

 

Fortunately the Asian manufacturers use  Australia as a testing ground for their new models and these problems just don't seem to occur with their products.  Unfortunately the Australian manufacture of cars has ceased and we must now look to imports.

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Hugh, do you mean no more Holdens?

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Mike G said:

Hugh, do you mean no more Holdens?


Pretend Holdens only now, Mike.

 

Made in Germany (Commodore) and Poland/Belgium/UK or South Korea (Astra). The original Australian-made Commodore (1978) was a copy of the German Opel Commodore that was properly welded and strengthened (powered with either a V6 or, as Aussie habits dictated, a thumping big V8) to survive the goat-tracks laughingly called "roads" in this country. There was an attempt to do a fuel-saving 4 cylinder version, which failed miserably.

 

The natively designed and built Holdens which preceded the Commodore were based on down-sized existing American Chevrolet models.

Finally firing a last shot over the bow, as it were, you have one of the last muscle-car Holdens exported to the UK as the Vauxhall VXR8.

 

From Wiki:

" Holden, formerly known as General Motors-Holden, is an Australian automobile importer and former automobile manufacturer with its headquarters in Port Melbourne, Victoria. The company was founded in 1852 as a saddlery manufacturer in England".

 

Having driven a UK built Land Rover Freelander 2 for nearly 8 almost completely trouble-free years here now, I can attest that Land Rover have lifted their game considerably since the 1990's/early 2000's when the question was when, rather than if, they would break down. The one thing I cannot fathom (having opened up the failed key fob to find about 40 cents of circuitry and a $1 battery) is the replacement cost of well over $500 for a key fob - which is what ruined my definition of "completely trouble-free". What a bloody rip-off....

 

 

 

Edited by Alan7140

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Yes Mike, just as Alan has described. 

 

Neither of the main political parties exactly loved our car industry, but neither is exactly slow in blaming the other for its demise.  In recent years the local products became quite acceptable.  Toyota, Holden, and Ford were the last three still going up to a couple of years ago when Ford, then Toyota, and finally Holden shut up shop.  Before that Mitsubishi, Chrysler, Nissan, and VW produced cars here, but the Australian market in truth was too small to support more than a few manufacturers. In recent years the remaining three exported cars and engines but once Ford got out, the secondary industries involving parts and component manufacture lost critical mass and that spelt the death knell for Toyota and Holden.  At the moment Toyota is No.1, and they sell more cars than the No.2 and No.3 players combined.  Australians seem to have switched to buying SUVs and light four door trucks such as the Toyota HiLux (the best selling vehicle here).  Holden is No.9 and not doing at all well with its imported offerings.

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I had one of the first-generation Land Rover Discovery models, bought new.

 

It was the worst car I ever owned. From day one it leaked diesel fuel - after a long drive the entire back of the car would be coated with diesel. Seven separate attempts were made to fix this under warranty, including replacement of the fuel tank and fuel lines, but the fault always returned.

 

The heater was totally ineffective for the first 30 minutes on a cold morning.

 

On one occasion I braked hard to avoid hitting a child who ran into the road. This warped the front brake discs. When I claimed replacements under the warranty, I was told "But Sir, you braked too hard".

 

In addition to all that, the car was slow, noisy and thirsty.

 

I can accept that LR have raised their game since then. I did have a good look at the Evoque recently, but bought an Audi Q2 instead.

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On 08/10/2018 at 06:24, Dallas said:

Down here in the sub-tropics we have a saying: never buy a French car. :D 

 

 

Now on my 5th Citroen and have also owned two Renault. Really upset that I can't replace my current C5 estate as it is no longer made.

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We've owed a number of cars since 1994. The most reliable have been Fords. We've owned 5 of them and (touch wood) they have all been excellent, no major problems at all.

 

The least reliable cars have been Volkswagens. We owned three of them, 2 Mk I Golfs and a 1.4i Polo. I'll never trust a VW product. I think they are designed to require services once a month at least. Also, after the emissions scandal I don't think they should even be allowed on the road. 

 

My favourite car to drive was my 1997 BMW E36. Simply the best build quality and after sales service I have ever experienced. 

 

Most economical car was my old 2001 Mercedes A160. I think it used to manufacture petrol somehow. It was fun to drive but the original design had a lot of issues. The least economical car I ever owned was also a Mercedes, the giant barge of an E240 V6 I inherited from my Dad. I have a soft spot for old Mercs and would love to have a W123 one day. My wife says she's never drive with me in it. I am incentivised! 

 

The worst new car experience I had was with a Nissan Sabre 200GXi. Brought onto our local market as a pocket rocket, this thing would destroy any other hot hatch of the time from a standing start. It drank fuel like a sailor on a shore break. My problem was that mine was in for repairs more often than it was on the road over a period of 11 months. Eventually Nisan relented and gave me most of my money back. That doesn't usually happen. 

 

 

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Luc, friends of ours after we arrived in Australia in 1964 had a '50's 203 as their daily driver, which was still their car well into the '70's when I lost touch with them through moving. That car never seemed to break down, and I hesitate to guess just how many miles it showed on its odometer when it presumably expired sometime after that.

 

Viv, I believe the Disco is still the model which gives the most trouble in Land Rover's stable, although this may finally have been put to bed with the latest, completely redesigned model. The Disco Sport is another kettle of fish - it's the direct descendant of the Freelander 2, although also redesigned. The Freelander 2 shared Ford Europe's Mondeo common platform, a legacy of Ford's ownership of LR during the '00's. How all the new models fare under the new ownership of TATA (India) is as yet open to conjecture, though. Then there's the yet-to-be-released replacement for the Defender, which will have a bumpy introduction as the legions of traditional Land Rover fans will be expecting something worthy of succeeding that much worked original 1948 design. They might succeed if they avoid the temptation to overload the new vehicle with electronic gadgetry and computers. "Limp home mode" is not an acceptable option when some electronic thing fails in the middle of Australia's vast Simpson Desert.

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16 hours ago, Alan7140 said:

Luc, friends of ours after we arrived in Australia in 1964 had a '50's 203 as their daily driver, which was still their car well into the '70's when I lost touch with them through moving. That car never seemed to break down, and I hesitate to guess just how many miles it showed on its odometer when it presumably expired sometime after that.

 

Viv, I believe the Disco is still the model which gives the most trouble in Land Rover's stable, although this may finally have been put to bed with the latest, completely redesigned model. The Disco Sport is another kettle of fish - it's the direct descendant of the Freelander 2, although also redesigned. The Freelander 2 shared Ford Europe's Mondeo common platform, a legacy of Ford's ownership of LR during the '00's. How all the new models fare under the new ownership of TATA (India) is as yet open to conjecture, though. Then there's the yet-to-be-released replacement for the Defender, which will have a bumpy introduction as the legions of traditional Land Rover fans will be expecting something worthy of succeeding that much worked original 1948 design. They might succeed if they avoid the temptation to overload the new vehicle with electronic gadgetry and computers. "Limp home mode" is not an acceptable option when some electronic thing fails in the middle of Australia's vast Simpson Desert.

Regarding the Defender successor, they would be well-advised to keep it simple. Sure, ditch the ladder chassis frame, but avoid such fripperies as electronic differentials and traction control. This vehicle needs to be repairable by amateur mechanics, using basic tools and without access to electronic diagnostic equipment.

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2 hours ago, vivionm said:

Regarding the Defender successor, they would be well-advised to keep it simple. Sure, ditch the ladder chassis frame, but avoid such fripperies as electronic differentials and traction control. This vehicle needs to be repairable by amateur mechanics, using basic tools and without access to electronic diagnostic equipment.

 

Agreed 100%. Alas, I doubt that is what we will see. 

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5 hours ago, Dallas said:

 

Agreed 100%. Alas, I doubt that is what we will see. 


Given that it is heavily disguised, if the following "spy" pictures (note the driver is happily co-operative) are in fact correct, then the squared-off lines but svelte waistline of prototype mule would indicate something that has the angular door frames of the old Defender but with the rest appearing to be along the lines of the current Land Rover line-up. The one thing they couldn't disguise clearly show an aluminium wish-boned rear-end, so the long travel of the old live axles will be gone and the prospect of frequently lifting wheels off the ground in rough terrain will be compensated for by electronic trickery, just as with the current Range Rover and Discovery line-up. A projected starting price of £40,000, if correct, means the old Defender concept is dead and buried, and Land Rover has abandoned that to the existing plethora of cheap, basic, simple utility 4WD vehicles that are predominantly Asian built.

 

2020 Defender Prototype Pictures

 

In Australia the Toyota Hilux (which isn't exactly cheap) has been the biggest selling 4WD for many years now - Defenders were really only being bought by Land Rover Tragics who thought it was still 1948 and there were still places to heroically discover in their "off-road" vehicle - never mind that is is becoming seriously difficult for anyone to find places to truly go "off road" - even in a vast and underpopulated country like Australia, there are tracks all over the place and it's hard to be a true discoverer these days, even in the most remote areas. That, and the fact that travelling off road/track is actually illegal in many places (you don't get caught by police, though, you get caught when you get stuck and call for help - and get charged for the rescue).

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Not quite as ugly as the most recent Discovery, but certainly not a utility vehicle like the last run of Defenders (I think they call them Pumas). The attraction to the Defender for me at least, is that you can accessorise it and pretty much turn it into a mobile home. That thing in the photos is just another Chelsea Chariot by the looks of it. 

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Actually, Luc... I have video footage of a Land Cruiser attempting to pull our Defender out of a river bank in 2015. It failed hopelessly to gather enough torque. :D (the Defender had run out of petrol). 

 

All the Rangers we've ever been on safari with there will tell you that the Defenders were just better off roaders than the Cruisers, especially when it came to driving on the soft stuff and through rivers. 

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I am not too surprised that the Toyota LandCruiser had trouble pulling the LandRover out.  The cruisers are very heavy beasts.  However they do have a reputation for being reliable.

 

Price is a driver in purchasing decisions everywhere, but Toyota's Prado is the arguably the favourite 4WD for the retired folks here  - mainly pulling caravans for longish distances on sealed roads. 

 

Then Nissan Patrols,  Ford Everests, Toyota Fortuners, and Izuzu MUX 4WDs.  Then there is the small 4WD truck brigade with Toyota HiLuxs, Nissan Navaras,  Ford's Rangers and all rest such as the European and American brands.

 

 

10 hours ago, Dallas said:

Actually, Luc... I have video footage of a Land Cruiser attempting to pull our Defender out of a river bank in 2015. It failed hopelessly to gather enough torque. :D (the Defender had run out of petrol). 

 

All the Rangers we've ever been on safari with there will tell you that the Defenders were just better off roaders than the Cruisers, especially when it came to driving on the soft stuff and through rivers. 

 

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On 12/10/2018 at 03:02, Luc de Schepper said:

How about the 2019 Suzuki Jimny as spiritual successor to the Defender? https://www.caradvice.com.au/664323/2019-jimny-australia-confirmed/

 

The Suzuki failed the Euro NCAP crash test miserably - just three stars and a dead driver-dummy, I think, the worst result for any new car in many years. That's why the delay in introduction, if indeed it ever gets released here at all. The Jimny might be handy off road at times due to its light weight and narrow track, but it equally has a reputation for being flimsy and under-powered, and is certainly not the large, customisable thing the Defender was.

 

Time will tell if the new Defender is TATA's first real miscalculation with the Jaguar/Land Rover brand, but maybe they seriously don't care about the rough-and-tough market - they seem to be able to sell all the luxo-vehicles they can make at the moment. From personal experience with one of the earlier models of the new generation, absolutely nothing has been able to stop my Freelander 2, despite the initial doubts of lack of ground clearance and low range. It has taken me up hills and tracks that used to give my venerable Land Cruiser FJ40 short wheelbase 4x4s of 1970's vintage trouble without so much as spinning a wheel or running out of power, and in a level of comfort that the Toyotas never even hinted at. Maybe it's time that the old Defender tragics also got with Century 21 and realised that you don't need to be shaken and stirred or wear a kidney belt in order to get to an off-road destination these days.

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