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Dallas

Striped Horse

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It's also the name of a very nice craft beer brand made in SA. 

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Funnily I never think 🤔 of them as horses!


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

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They are certainly members of the horse family.

 

Dallas, a nice portrait.  I like the look of the tight crop and out of focus background that you have captured here. 

 

Are these animals docile?  I have heard that the temprament of Zebras can be much less predictable than horses.

Edited by Hugh_3170

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Hugh, yes I realise they are a species of horse, just never think of them that way!

 

I would suggest that because they are wild and I’ve seen tv of them kicking out that their tempers are a bit on the short side, and of course other animals like to eat them!


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

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Thanks gents. 

 

@Mike G if you'd like some amusement and can find it, watch this movie. It was actually filmed not far from where I live. 

 

@Hugh_3170 yes, they can be temperamental. I wouldn't want to approach one! 

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And for those on the North American continent we pronounce their name zeb-rah, not zee-bra. :D 

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4 hours ago, Dallas said:

And for those on the North American continent we pronounce their name zeb-rah, not zee-bra. :D 

Just as we say 'Jagyewar", not 'Jagwar'.

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Don’t get me started on pronouncing British county names!

 

Liked the film clip!


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

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And not the Aussie & Kiwi "Jag-you-Are"!

 

 

2 hours ago, vivionm said:

Just as we say 'Jagyewar", not 'Jagwar'.

 

 

 

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That’s what I was trying to say!

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8 hours ago, Dallas said:

And for those on the North American continent we pronounce their name zeb-rah, not zee-bra. :D 

I prefer Zedbra, as opposed to Zeebra.

 

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3 hours ago, Mike G said:

Don’t get me started on pronouncing British county names!

 

Liked the film clip!

Mike,

Why is there a Sussex, Wessex and Essex, but no Norsex? (South, West, East, but no North).

Did Scotland get in the way?

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Maybe No-sex was a bit uncomfortable to contemplate? ;) 

 

 

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Yes. It would be.

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Nor sex = Norfolk and don’t forget Middlesex. Where I come from!

And “sex” equates to the Saxons.

The Wash roughly equates to the northern limits of the Saxon lands!


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

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Norfolk. The folk of the North. Of course. And the Saxons. We can talk about the Angles another time.

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On 03/10/2018 at 03:40, Mike G said:

Nor sex = Norfolk and don’t forget Middlesex. Where I come from!

And “sex” equates to the Saxons.

The Wash roughly equates to the northern limits of the Saxon lands!

And further north again was the mighty kingdom of Northumbria, an area with more Danish origins. 

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And then there is Suburbia ...

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On 03/10/2018 at 07:16, vivionm said:

Norfolk. The folk of the North. Of course. And the Saxons. We can talk about the Angles another time.

 

And I live just 16km away from "New Norfolk" Tasmania, which is about as far South as you can get from old Blighty and still be in the Commonwealth. Some Scottish-sounding cities on the South Island of New Zealand (including Christchurch, Dunedin and Invercargill) hold that ultimate distinction - as well New Norfolk here in Tasmania was named after semi-tropical Norfolk Island in the Pacific (not Norfolk in England) which in turn had been equally inexplicably named by Captain Cook after the Duchess of Norfolk in England. Maybe a favour was owed? ;)

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Yes indeed, Dunedin and Invercargill are especially Scottish.  Dunedin is known as the Edinburgh of the south.  The city fathers back in the 1800s quite literally grabbed the street map for Edinburgh and that became the blue print for laying out Dunedin, right down to having the same street names!  Invercargill was more organic in its creation, but its street names are very Scottish; its main street is Tay Street.  Christchurch is more English in its feel.  In the far south even people's speech after 150 plus years is not entirely free of the Scottish burgh.

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