Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
crowecg

Rolling shutter

Recommended Posts

I was a little surprised during some discussions here which got onto the topic of slow shutter speeds, electronic vs mechanical shutters and the whole topic of rolling shutter.  I'd been a little bit spoiled as my previous experience in this area had been with a Nikon J1 and it turns out, whilst there isn't that much real need for the 60fps burst mode, it does mean it has a very fast shutter read time and hence negligible rolling shutter effect.  

 

So with another camera for comparison, I set out to try some experiments.  These shots were all from the window of a moving train.  I'm not sure of the exact speed, I believe the speed limit through this area is about 90km/h, and my estimate would be anywhere between 60-80km/h.  My intention was to mach the shutter speeds as well (initially all at 1/125s, although to get enough light for the J1 I had to drop that a bit and rely on that 60fps burst mode!)

 

So first, some from the J1...  They aren't amazing photos, but the thing to look at is any vertical elements in the images.

 

 

RS01x.thumb.jpg.f52fa0fac4153bbb128adad446b48513.jpgRS02x.thumb.jpg.06a927c90007a92e651ea50de52398cf.jpgRS03x.thumb.jpg.61083bb6c8052a17c716ca6095467fc4.jpg

 

Then the comparison, a Fuji X-E3.  Firstly mechanical shutter.

 

RS05x.thumb.jpg.6e75cf267f9c9936a1df530639fb8c78.jpg

 

and now electronic shutter...RS04x.thumb.jpg.de60ac00f30211676a50cb6410d5da0d.jpg

 

That J1 is certainly an amazing little camera - if only Nikon had really understood the market for such cameras outside their home country.

 

A little bit of research suggests that the target for global shutter is a readout time of around 1/200s and is just about being achieved by some high end video cameras.  Some publicity material for the new Fuji X-T3 was bragging of readout times of 1/60s compared to 1/20s for older models.  I guess that around 1/20s must be where the X-E3 is and that seems to be 'normal' for a lot of current cameras.  I'm surprised that it is still so slow.  Given the J1 is now over 7 years old, I wonder why that sensor tech hasn't made it elsewhere.

Edited by crowecg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My D70s had an electronic first curtain - which meant flash sync at all shutter speeds (useful for bright day outdoor backlit portraiture using fill flash and wide apertures to render backgrounds out of focus).

 

That disappeared with my next Nikon, the "pro-level" D2x which returned to a fully mechanical shutter and limited flash sync speed. As was the case for every subsequent Nikon I owned. I bought the D70s in early 2005, so over 13 years ago. Oddly Nikon limited the flash sync speed of the D70s to 1/500 if you were using a Nikon brand flash; using off-brand or studio flash the little camera would sync all the way out to 1/4000 sec, from memory.

 

Sometimes the choices of manufacturers are puzzling indeed, and sometimes I wonder if manufacturers actually know how their cameras are used. Sometimes I think manufacturers base their model specs on wish lists published in Internet blogs, not on proper surveys of working photographers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Alan7140

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a D50 which had the same shutter - it was great to be able to pop up the flash on a bright sunny day to get some fill, even with fast shutter speeds.  I got some really nice shots of the kids running and playing that really took advantage of this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And just for a further comparison - an iPhone image.

 

IMG_1725.thumb.jpg.19f48ad8630625c58b8b08c53dae6890.jpg

 

Some distinct rolling shutter there.  Luckily I got it the right way round - I wasn't sure what the readout direction would be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Conversely I've found that if you pan from a stationary position following a moving vehicle, you have to hold the camera upside-down to get the aesthetically pleasing "forward" lean to things, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By visiting this website you are agreeing to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy & Guidelines.