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waltonksm

How to move a crane

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I have spent a lot of time around earth moving equipment, but very little time around cranes.  It seems that technology has changed quite a bit, too, since I worked around a mechanical "monster."  I have a few photos of a crane that has disassembled itself, and is ready to go for a ride.  This was the best show in town for a few days.  We have never had a crane so large show up at our dock.  This is rated as a 250 ton capacity crane.  When they finish putting in the extra boom segments, it will be able to work at a height of 200 feet.  The first photo shows it moving the three blades for the wind turbine it will assemble over the next two months. For those of you who have my problem doing math in your head, that is a maximum load of 500,000 pounds (about 227,000 kilos.)

 

These are the 3 three turbine blades.

 

Moving a 900 KW Wind Turbine

 

 

And this is the main truck they use for hauling heavy loads. The maximum rated capacity is right at 250,000 pounds. It has 8 wheel drive, and the rear wheels can also be steered to help out on sharp turns.  This is the rig, with the blades loaded. It seats six, and I found a company that will do a custom camping/travel RV for only $290,000.  It is a bargain, as it includes the cost of the vehicle.  The rig is military surplus, and was referred to as a "tank hauler."

 

Moving a 900 KW Wind Turbine

 

Here it is with the boom extensions all removed, and the truck is headed to the work site with the end segment.

 

Disassembling Crane

 

Here it is with the whole track assembly removed. This involves releasing a couple of hydraulic fittings, and two massive hydraulic pins that hold the assembly to the frame.

 

Moving a Crane

 

Just about loaded....

 

Moving a Crane

 

 

And away it goes........

 

Moving a Crane

 

 

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Nice little story, Walton. Thanks for posting. 

 

I had no idea that turbine blades were that large. It does make me wonder about the amount of wind it would take to get them turning? 

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Posted (edited)

They did more than a year of wind monitoring at a couple of sites about 300 feet higher in elevation than the village.  I am just about willing to bet that if there were no MASSIVE incentives from the government, that these would not be built.  I have no idea of the costs.

 

I do not know what it takes to turn.  A bit later I will have a photo of the turbine/generator unit.  It is huge.  They are claiming that this can handle the load of three small villages, simultaneously.  I am about 95% certain that this is just the eyewash they used in their application for some of the funding.  Fifteen years ago we (our small village) would draw about 550KW during the work/school week, at minus 20F, with a little wind.  When the school kitchen cranked up for lunch the numbers would really rise.  The other two villages are larger than ours.  I have trouble believing the loads have all dropped in the last 15 years.

 

Two other, almost unrelated points:  The views that are clearly from a higher point are taken from my "porch."  This is part of the wonderful view that I have.  As long as I avoid a couple of rotten spots in the floor, it is a great observation deck.  Secondly, most of these photos were taken with the Em1 Mark II.  The largest view of the images on Flickr (almost 3500 x 5000 resolution) have virtually no noise, and are still quite sharp.  The more I use this camera, the more I like it. There is little to complain about with these.  The resolution looks great!

Edited by waltonksm
typos/misspelled words

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Interesting. Thanks for posting.

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Very interesting and nice pictures. Thank you for sharing to us.

 

P.s. at first with your title I was thinking that Nikon would be the main subject! 😉

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