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Alan7140

Eclipse

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Up at 4:45 a.m. walking up the road to a paddock with a clear view to the west as the moon slowly got eaten away by the Earth's shadow, set up and ready to shoot by 5:30 just as totality was due and the clouds moved in as if on cue....

 

Whilst Mars continued to taunt me all the while like a petulant child poking out its tongue, I spent the next 50 minutes staring at little else but blackness where the moon should be as the cold gradually seeped through two pairs of socks and three layers of clothing until 6:20 a.m. when I caught sight of the faintest bit of red blurred by the clouds. I shot off a few exposures, still barely able to see the moon other than a faint reddish smudge, but the X-T2 had no such problem, revealing a truly bloody eclipsed moon with colour smudged beyond its outline by the heavy cloud.

 

Exposure was 10 sec @ f/2.8, 3200 ISO, 50-140/2.8 lens @ 66mm and no, I didn't boost the colour - it's pretty much exactly as the camera presented it, although I did desaturate the blues and cyans slightly.

 

PW4cDj5.jpg

 

Although the result wasn't what I expected or envisaged beforehand, I have to say that I like it well enough even if only for the fact that I've never seen a lunar eclipse photo quite like it.

 

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The cloud cover in the UK was so complete that there was no point in even thinking of going out to set up.

 

You have produced an unusual and beautiful image of the event.

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I'm always amazed how the camera captures so much more detail and colors at night that what I'm able to see

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Photographing the moon is probably one of the most frustrating things I have ever tried. I just can't get a shot that I'm happy with. Last night's eclipse however gave us perfect weather, but unfortunately even with perfect conditions and the moon high in the sky at the time the eclipse began here (about 830pm) without a decent tripod and head to support my biggest lens... 

 

EM1B9778.jpg

Before it began I think I got this one handheld using spot metering while the angle was still lowish. 

 

EM1B9788.jpg

As the shadow began to sap the light from the surface of the moon things got a little trickier. 

 

EM1B9798.jpg

Eventually with this orb almost directly above my head and me trying to use the EVF (because I couldn't find the bloody thing in the LCD and keep my aim!) I got the beginning of the orange. After this one I just gave up. 

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the moon occupies only half a degree arc in the sky, so when using a long lens it is indeed hard to find

AF on a well illuminated moon works most of the time

Spot exposure gives a good indication where the exposure should be, but I usually under expose a bit to get more detail

 

exposing an eclipse ... is difficult, AF stops working and shooting when is exactly overhead is frustrating

 

so ... I think you did quite well

 

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I am always frustrated with moon shots as well. 😂 

 

Photos are the only way I will get to see this eclipse. It wasn't viewable from my location. However, it was full and bright here. 😀

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Personally I didn't see much point of locking my maximum focal length lens onto my camera to record a closeup of the moon itself as that is what everybody seems to do as a default eclipse shot, and that the Internet was bound to be bombarded with images of reddish moons on a black background as a result.

 

There are observatories with telescope cameras specifically built for the purpose which will out-do anyone with a standard camera anyway, so my original intent was to show snow-capped Mt Field at the bottom of frame as the first light of dawn lifted it from the shadows, with the eclipsed moon and Mars at its brightest in the starry sky above (hence my trek to that west-facing paddock in the pre-dawn darkness of a rapidly disappearing moon). The cloud killed that intent, though - Mt Field is in the shadow but cannot be seen unfortunately, but I was indeed fortunate in the way that the cloud  spread and amplified the colour of both objects in the heavily overcast sky.

 

Not that it means anything, but the result obviously appealed as this is now the most "liked," commented on and shared photo (and by a good margin) that I have yet posted on FB. I still would have preferred the originally intended photo would have happened, though. :) 

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43632934422_fa0172522f_o.jpg

 

 

D500 afs300mm f/2.8 @f/8 iso 8000 on tripod, manual focus

I tried a long exposure at base iso which didnt work since the moon was rising too fast 

It was the first time i ever did this learned a few things should have shot wide open raised both the shutter and iso

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That is the most original shot of the eclipse I've seen!

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