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merlin

Canyon Scene

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It's difficult to represent the 3-dimensionality of canyons photographically, mainly because the 2 dimensional medium requires a little manipulation to trick our eyes into seeing the third dimension. Try using scale of objects in the foreground and background to lead the eye in the frame. 

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To my eyes the brown shrubbery obscures the canyon view!

 

But I love the colours. 

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13 hours ago, Dallas said:

It's difficult to represent the 3-dimensionality of canyons photographically, mainly because the 2 dimensional medium requires a little manipulation to trick our eyes into seeing the third dimension. Try using scale of objects in the foreground and background to lead the eye in the frame. 

 

Thanks for the tip, Dallas -- much appreciated!

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11 hours ago, Mike G said:

To my eyes the brown shrubbery obscures the canyon view!

 

But I love the colours. 

 

Thanks, Mike!  I titled this "Canyon Scene" rather than "Canyon View" because it is taken within the canyon, not looking into it.  The trail runs along a creek at the bottom of the canyon, and this is a photograph taken along the way.

 

And due to the very steep slopes, it is impossible, in most places, to get any other views.

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Posted (edited)

Or do the sideways-step shuffle when taking two consecutive portrait-oriented shots, and present them side-by side with the left shot on the right, and right shot on the left. Going cross-eyed when looking at the pair renders the scene as 3-D, after a bit of practice. The camera should move about 2.5 inches to the right, try to keep the frame borders containing the same image boundaries, though. Many people can't get the hang of this method of viewing, but with practice it becomes second nature.

 

Display the following photo full-size and sit back from the screen a bit, then while looking at the pair slowly go cross-eyed until a third, 3-D image appears in the middle when the side pictures register. Once they register concentrate on that middle image and the two side images will fade as the brain's optical processor takes over. To help this along, bring your hands up to the sides of your face like horse's blinkers and gradually move them inwards until the side images completely disappear. As I said, it takes practice, but this scene suddenly goes from flat 2-D to incredible depth and distance.

 

qfdELlH.jpg

 

As the viewer, it becomes immediately apparent that you are standing right on the edge of a fatally high cliff... :D

Edited by Alan7140
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Will definitely have to practice!  Thanks for sharing this, Alan.

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Using a wide angle lens helps the effect, and it would definitely sort the foreground from background in your canyon shot. This solitary tree shot was taken with an 8mm fisheye, which was de-fished using Fisheye Hemi software.

 

I remember what a struggle it was initially to get things working properly, but now I can acquire the 3-D image in one or two seconds from first looking at the pair. A friend who worked at the Aerial Photographic section of the State Government said they used this cross-over technique when examining the 10"x10" contact prints of aerial views rather than use their stereo viewer stands as it was far quicker to do so. The only drawback is that the 3-D image appears to be about half the size of the original (hence the viewers have magnifying lenses) - the brain indeed works in mysterious ways.

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Phone screens are actually quite good for your 3D viewing (unless you are a bit too long sighted).  Turn to landscape orientation and you can bring the phone in close enough that you almost can’t help but see the 3D effect.  

 

For this his one I did find it a bit difficult looking down into the bottom right corner to see the cliff.

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