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Alan7140

Wild Thing

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Not taken with an iPhone, but with a camera and film, and not quite a Mini, but a mini-Suzuki nonetheless... :D

 

dQ4RVv8.jpg

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That's quite a 'roo bar/roll cage!

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Brings to mind the Trogs song of the same name!

 

I remember film, thank god its only a memory. :crazy:

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I'm not trying to promote the general use of film, Mike, nor detract from the benefits of digital (and it's not lost on me that this result was achieved only by photographing the neg with a Sigma sdQ-H digital camera ;) ), but it's early days as yet for me in using film again and I have a lot of rust to remove before I get truly proficient with it.

 

Unlike digital, the old medium format USSR camera gives me zero feedback and zero help at the time of taking, and has already given me a shakeup as to how mentally lazy my approach to the taking process has become, particularly since the advent of the Fuji and its EVF displaying the end result and exposure exactly as it will be before I even take the shot. I'm also having to relearn the art of "seeing" in B&W, something I used to be really good at but have let slip badly over the past 15 years. About a third of the 24 shots I took yesterday were cutting-room floor jobs for me having been swayed by what the colours looked like rather than the tones they would reproduce with.

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I used to have a Zenit 3m I think it was, a truly awful Russian 35mm camera + Industar 50mm, later followed by an Exa 2b German and built like a tank and probably weighed as much! But they were cheap.

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Nevertheless, you produced a nicely composed image with plasing tones.

 

Proving once again that there is more than one way to make nice pictures :)

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3 hours ago, Mike G said:

I used to have a Zenit 3m I think it was, a truly awful Russian 35mm camera + Industar 50mm, later followed by an Exa 2b German and built like a tank and probably weighed as much! But they were cheap.

A big regret of mine is that I sold my Zeiss Ikon film rangefinder camera.

The nicest camera I ever used. No longer made.

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17 hours ago, Alan7140 said:

...

the old medium format USSR camera gives me zero feedback and zero help at the time of taking

...

you carry an external exposimeter ? or is this a sunny 16 rule image?

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4 hours ago, armando_m said:

you carry an external exposimeter ? or is this a sunny 16 rule image?

 

The Kiev-60 comes with a prism which houses an uncoupled exposure meter (basically a hand-held meter with a camera attached to it, reading off the viewing screen). So far I have two of these prisms, neither of which either work properly or give accurate readings.

 

So yes, I do carry a Polaris Dual-5 exposure meter, but the years of experience haven't left me and usually I'm accurate just with guessing, only using the exposure meter to confirm if the lighting is tricky (as in the shop) or the shot is too important to get right straight away. Outdoors on a sunny day here in summer with 100 ISO film, 1/125sec @ f/11 is the basic setting I return the camera to after taking any shots that may differ from this (such as backlit, which is usually around 1/60@f/8). In other words, if I left the exposure meter at home I wouldn't panic and not take photographs because of that.

 

The shot in this post was 1/125@f/11, and as can be seen by highlight detail vs deep shadow detail, exposure is correct for my developing technique, temperature and time.

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