Alan7140

BMW

29 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

this was/is a great car, even if in this time the big OPEL had the best rear axles

nice Alpina rims

...and a good picture, forgot that we are in a photo forum...

 

Edited by 56 DIN
typo(s)
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Very nice car. 

 

I like the angled pose.

 

Is it a South African made version?  It looks very similar to my nephews BMW, which was made in SA.

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Lovely car and great photo, Alan. 

 

Hugh, there is a large BMW plant in SA that I think exports most of the 3 series models to right hand drive markets. Not sure if they were doing it in 1969 though. 

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13 hours ago, Hugh_3170 said:

Is it a South African made version?  It looks very similar to my nephews BMW, which was made in SA.

 

Interesting - I'll ask him if he knows where it was built. In 1969 Australia had not yet imposed sanctions on South Africa over Apartheid, so it's possible that its origins could be from there rather than the German factories.

 

I know there was a brisk trade the other way at the time in Australian GM product (known here as Holden, but rebadged as Chevrolet for the South African market), so it's not inconceivable that trade incentives were in place for return trade of equivalent product.

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With the exception of Toyota, VW, BMW, Ford and Mercedes, all the major car manufacturers pulled out of SA during the isolation era. GM continued on under the Opel brand, but in recent years they have re-appeared here as Chevrolet and some previously Opel models are now coming into the market as Chevrolet, typical example being the Corsa Ute which is now a Chev. 

 

I've owned exactly one BMW in my life, a 1997 (E36) 316i in Fjord grey which I absolutely loved and wish I still owned. It was a beautiful machine. There's something about driving a BMW that just can't be explained. I've had later model Mercedes cars but that BMW stole my heart. 

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Unbeknownst to me, the owners of the car took a photo of me taking the main topic's photo.

 

I submit this as positive proof of the benefit of flip screens for those who still think that fixed LCD screens are somehow advantageous. :D

 

Z6VTXpt.jpg

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Your earlier experience is showing!

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Thanks, Ann.

 

Photographing cars on location was one of my favourite parts of the early advertising part of my career, even if most of the time I was playing a secondary role as assistant photographer. This was just a quick park and photograph setup, back in the day such details as jacking up the car to rotate the wheels so the logo on the centre-cap would be right-way up and perfectly level was but one of the many detail things that I was responsible for (but which I didn't bother with here). We would also probably have rolled out a bolt of black cloth just out of shot to clean up the reflections in the lower body panels.

 

Amusingly Matt (the owner) posted this on his Facebook page without explanation and someone commented "is he alright?", I guess I do look like I'm in the middle of a medical emergency there... :) 

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Alan, it's just old age creeping up on you. :D I agree since owning my Fuji's that using the flip screen is much easier on these old bones and with a proper live view very easy to use.

 

You seem to be quite far away from the car, what lens were you using?

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Even at a younger age I wouldn't have enjoyed grovelling around on my belly amidst the rubbish on the ground trying to look through a viewfinder, Mike. :) Which is also I guess why all the professional cameras I used back then had a waist level finder as a standard-equipment detachable choice. I never could understand why digital appeared to deem such a thing unnecessary, and only fit for amateur use. The Fuji GFX has finally introduced a proper digital viewfinder solution with its tilting EVF to the big-guns, pro line-ups. The tilt screen is definitely a worthwhile thing as well.

 

I used the 50-140/2.8 lens for this, Mike, set at 140mm, of course. One of the rare occasions that I also shot at base ISO of 200 in order to absolutely minimise noise and get that red as true-to-life as possible as well, and f/5.0 to give me a bit of DOF along the car without bringing the background too sharply into focus (as well as being around the optimal performance aperture of the lens sharpness-wise). Shutter speed was 1/125 sec, camera was a couple of inches off the ground hand-held, OIS on.

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I wondered if that was the lens you used as it's one of your favourites, thanks for the info, just me being nosey. :D it's just a pity that the 50-140mm is so heavy, but as you show it is very hand holdable!

 

I find it's not so much getting down and dirty but getting up afterwards, when I took the picture of my White & Bluebells, I over balanced onto my back, and spent quite a few minutes struggling to get up without a support to assist me. :crazy: Trouble is that my mind says I'm still 30 years old but the bloody body insists on telling me different. :(

 

The GFX viewfinder I would like to think points the way to the future for the rumoured "Ultimate  X camera" and maybe a modular camera so the the components could be swapped  for an improved or altered components!

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Nice car indeed. I once had a BMW 328ci which was wonderful.

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It is not that uncommon over here to see classic restored cars being used as daily drivers. A colleague just imported a Fiat 2300S coupe "wreck" from Sicily, it will take him two/three years or so of his free time to restore it in it's original state.

 

If I had to choose between flip LCD or not, I always would take the AF-ON button... :crazy:

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3 hours ago, Alan7140 said:

Even at a younger age I wouldn't have enjoyed grovelling around on my belly amidst the rubbish on the ground trying to look through a viewfinder, Mike. :) Which is also I guess why all the professional cameras I used back then had a waist level finder as a standard-equipment detachable choice. I never could understand why digital appeared to deem such a thing unnecessary, and only fit for amateur use. The Fuji GFX has finally introduced a proper digital viewfinder solution with its tilting EVF to the big-guns, pro line-ups. The tilt screen is definitely a worthwhile thing as well.

 

 

I reckon a modular digital system with a waist level finder would be a great idea.  One reason DSLR's get so big is that the circuit boards and LCD all get stacked behind the sensor at the back of the mirror box.  Shift the circuit board of to one side, put the LCD on the top and you could keep the flange distance of a DSLR for a mirrorless package.  You could also get away with a single LCD - a simple prism over the top LCD could convert you easily to an EVF.  It wouldn't even need to be the fancy penta-prism as you could correct the reversal electronically on the LCD when it detects the prism is present.

 

Interestingly, a lot of the shots I posted of last night, I was shooting as if it was a waist level camera.  Unfortunately the J1 has a fixed LCD, so pretty much point and pray, but the positioning braced against my stomach I think helped with the crazy low shutter speeds I was using.

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Nice colourful image of a great "young timer" car. My father used to drive BMW (320 and 323i 6-cylinder) when I got my driving license these were the first cars I got to drive, nice ... I also like the "making of" image. Tilting screens are a great addition to a camera!

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Ann, I cannot locate the link where you show your waist level viewing gadget that you created for your D3 DSLR - it was quite some time ago now. 

 

IIRC, it featured a mirror mounted at 45 degrees to the LCD screen and it was attached with tape or Velco.

 

I think that I saw it on this site somewhere.

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Hugh:

You have an astonishing memory because I originally posted this PDF back in 2010!

Reflex Viewfinder.pdf

(Click the Link to download the PDF to your computer.)

 

While my reflex Viewfinder works well on the D3 series, I unfortunately cannot make an upgrade for my D5 because neither Delkin nor Flipbak make their devices big enough to fit the larger LCD on the back of the D5.

 

 

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I have to agree that the flippable LCD is a huge advance in utility.

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Ann:         Many thanks for the link to your PDF.  Hopefully Delkin or Flipbak will eventually release a D5 compatible version of their product.

 

Anthony:  Me too.  I have an Oympus OMD E-M1 and I have often used its LCD in "flip mode".  As well as the convenience for waist or low level shots, its flippable screen also facilitates above head shots from within crowds or to simply get a better viewpoint.

 

 

7 hours ago, Anthony said:

I have to agree that the flippable LCD is a huge advance in utility.

 

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Flippable screens can be very convenient indeed, and the additional swing of the X-T2's screen (with a proper lock) for portrait mode is very well done. Mechanically speaking flippable screens are relatively "safe" in the closed position, but become a "Murphy" liability when flipped out and require attention in order not to get damaged. In broad daylight I find them only useful for framing, for adjustment of the focus point and exposure I still have to revert to the viewfinder in order to see anything at all.

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Just to return to an earlier question about the car - I asked Matt if it was a South African built example but he didn't know.

Does anyone have any clues as to how to determine this?

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Alan, it should be on the car's compliance plate.  These are usually found on the front firewall once the bonnet / hood is lifted.  Toyota sometimes also put them on the "B" pillar.  I will email my nephew as to where his is located.  He is a car buff and should know.  Bear with me.

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Thanks, Hugh. I'll get Matt to check the compliance plate, although there's no guarantee that'll be legible still. The car's been repainted at least once before Matt had it returned to its original red.

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One of my criteria for cameras is "Rugged and dependable" and the "rugged" Nikons (the D-single-digit models) don't have flip screens (probably because flip-screens are not rugged"?).

 

I simply use CamRanger for flip-screen situations: that lets me drive the camera in LiveView mode by wiFi remotely from my iPad, my iPhone or my computer.

 

With CamRanger, I can have total control of all of the camera's features (including stacking), zoomed in focussing etc., and all on a really big screen.

 

CamRanger instantly downloads a JPG to the device and simultaneously saves a RAW .nef to the card in the camera. Also, I can operate the camera from as far as 50 metres away if I want to. This works even better than a flip screen particularly if the camera needs to be on the floor in a tight corner or 10-feet up on the top of a pole!

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