crowecg

Model goes missing in the middle of a photo shoot

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Last night a couple of Pholcus phalangioides send my wife screaming from the shower.  

 

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Daddy Long Legs 

 

Sorry only pictures of these, not my wife.

 

After capturing and taking them downstairs for mug shots before releasing them in to the back yard

 

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Mug shot

 

one of them just disappeared.  I looked everywhere for it, but couldn't find it.  I decided I wouldn't say anything about loosing one before reaching the yard and went to pack my camera away.

 

31501643101_db4605d7cf_o.jpg

Hiding 

 

There it was hiding on the front of the lens.  The Tamron SP90 does have quite a recessed front element, so plenty space for it.  I'm surprised I didn't see some sign of it in the picture given I was manually set at minimum focus.

 

Images:  Close-ups Nikon D7000 with Tamron SP90.  View of lens Nikon J1 with 10 f/2.8

 

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:D good story :)

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:D

 

Use this story as evidence that most spiders spook people because they are simply desperate to get away from you and hide. Sure there are a number of species that bite before fleeing, or worse, bite for the sheer hell of it and stand there ready to have another go at you (the Sydney Funnelweb is perhaps the quintessential example of this), but most are simply trying to flee or hide.

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13 hours ago, Alan7140 said:

:D

 

Use this story as evidence that most spiders spook people because they are simply desperate to get away from you and hide. Sure there are a number of species that bite before fleeing, or worse, bite for the sheer hell of it and stand there ready to have another go at you (the Sydney Funnelweb is perhaps the quintessential example of this), but most are simply trying to flee or hide.

 

I don't mind spiders - it's snakes that I don't like!

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Whilst searching for the missing arachnid, I did come across a dead moth.  Perhaps I should have hung onto it to give stacking a go - but then I would have the problem of where to store it!

 

31344640230_e03edcbd1e_o.jpg

Dead Moth

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10 hours ago, crowecg said:

 

I don't mind spiders - it's snakes that I don't like!

 

Quite so - I've just about walked into more Tiger snakes than the law of averages states that I should have been bitten by now, and this is made worse by the fact that unlike the rest of Australia, Tasmania's three species of snakes are all poisonous, the Tiger being the worst of a bad choice, and from February through March the most aggressive as well. As with spiders, their behaviour is usually to flee if possible, but if they feel threatened and decide to go into attack mode, unlike spiders there is zero chance of you being fast enough to get away from them. Tiger snakes will easily outpace the fastest runner. They're the one thing that makes me anxious when bushwalking, and which makes snakeless Ireland and New Zealand such appealing alternatives.

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Ireland is indeed snake-free. The only native reptiles are small harmless lizards in the mountains of the south-west.

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On 20/12/2016 at 08:29, Alan7140 said:

 

Quite so - I've just about walked into more Tiger snakes than the law of averages states that I should have been bitten by now, and this is made worse by the fact that unlike the rest of Australia, Tasmania's three species of snakes are all poisonous, the Tiger being the worst of a bad choice, and from February through March the most aggressive as well. As with spiders, their behaviour is usually to flee if possible, but if they feel threatened and decide to go into attack mode, unlike spiders there is zero chance of you being fast enough to get away from them. Tiger snakes will easily outpace the fastest runner. They're the one thing that makes me anxious when bushwalking, and which makes snakeless Ireland and New Zealand such appealing alternatives.

 

Most of my snake encounters have involved equal amounts of fleeing - so photos are rare!  My closet encounter was with a very large python in Hong Kong - it was purely a matter of who had right of way down a narrow mountain path and of course I was happy to step aside.

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Pretty emotion-inducing photos.  I wish you could have gotten more DOF on the spider, but good job here.

 

He does look like a Snow Crab, doesn't he?

 

The moth looks professional also.

 

Shoot more!

 

G

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On 02/01/2017 at 13:03, GB111 said:

Pretty emotion-inducing photos.  I wish you could have gotten more DOF on the spider, but good job here.

 

He does look like a Snow Crab, doesn't he?

 

The moth looks professional also.

 

Shoot more!

 

G

Thanks for commenting.  I tend to shoot handheld at 1:1 magnification on an APS-C sensor.  My subjects are mostly live, so DOF is limited.  I have been working on better lighting  - I've borrowed a couple of LCD panel flashlights off my kids for some of these shots to supplement the on camera flash.

 

As I mention earlier, I should have hung on to the dead moth to give stacking a try for more depth of field.   It is not something I have played with yet but is obviously problematic with live subjects.   Or perhaps I need to head out somewhere more tropical to find some larger subjects that don't need so much magnification :o

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If you're quick enough with stacking (needs lots of practice) you can usually nail live subjects while they're in their initial, defensive "if I hold still long enough maybe the giant thing won't notice me" mode. No good to try to set up on a tripod usually, but hand held and braced well you can usually get the required number of stacked shots accomplished.

 

Inch-long wolf spider very much alive...

FSNQzsb.jpg

 

Probably in excess of twenty shots, hand braced on ground. It did move its foreleg a bit, but otherwise was perfectly motionless.

 

Or smaller - a weevil on a wall, again, hand braced on the wall:

DfY9cxg.jpg

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