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Wolf Spider


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Alan7140

I forced this one out of its burrow by using a high-pressure fine water jet aimed through the soil at an angle so the water would come up from below - worked a treat, and while it sat there stunned for a minute or two I managed to get this free-hand 24 stack, Zeiss Touit 50/2.8 Makro, 1/45 @ f/11, 1600 ISO, just at last light as the shadows crept up to it.

 

Unfortunately it moved one of its front legs during the stack, which I left unretouched as proof that it was very much alive. These things move incredibly quickly when of a mind to, which this one did shortly after as I attempted another stack - one frame it was there, next not a sign of it...

FSNQzsb.jpg

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I forced this one out of its burrow by using a high-pressure fine water jet aimed through the soil at an angle so the water would come up from below - worked a treat, and while it sat there stunned fo

Thanks, Tony & Thomas (56 DIN).   Of course the full size version (nearly three times bigger) holds even more nuances, although that moved leg is then equally more obvious.   I also like that

I had the tendency to stand up and run away from the computer. Then I calmed down realizing that it is only a picture. Uff.

Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

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Guest bjornthun

As long as these critters stay small...

I'm impressed that you manage to stack in the field. It gives much more hairy and scary(?) details! Much more interesting to look at.

Edit: typo

Edited by bjornthun
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Akira

Gorgeous spider!  The fact that you shot the critter with the stacking technique is more amazing than this critter itself...

"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

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Outstanding opportunity and resulting photo.  

Alan, When you do a freehand series intended for stacking, do you shoot at a high FPS rate and continuously rack the focus, or is each shot and focus move made individually and sequentially?

Keith B.

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Alan7140

Thanks for the comments - for me the triumph was to finally work out a way of extracting these critters from their burrows without harming them or getting them too messed up. At the first touch of the water from below they simply pop up out of the burrow, looking, I suppose, like a spider looks in stunned surprise. :) Interesting was that the spider burrow hole looks exactly like those for large earwigs (1½-2" long), several of which I flushed before getting the spider, and none of which I photographed because they were all wriggling violently after being flushed out.

 

Answering direct questions:

 

Ann: it's about ¾" in body length. That small size and those long, athletic legs make it the fastest moving spider I've ever seen.

 

Keith: Shooting individual shots in S mode, moving the focus ring manually, watching the focus overlaps through focus peaking on the LCD tilt-screen with the lens hood resting on the ground for stability at that slow shutter speed. There is no OIS in that Zeiss lens.

 

Shooting that way is very quick - according to the exif the 24 shots took 33 seconds, including a reflex pause to contemplate finishing or starting again when I saw that leg move.

I used to try the CH while turning the focus, but it was too much of a hit-or-miss affair, plus the shutter speed had to be fast which isn't so commonly achievable in on-ground macros.

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Guest Thomas Van Dyke

Amazing capture in situ... so much more relevant to see this arachnid in it's habit...

 

Thank you for providing the technical data... helps one get their head around the methodologies involved...

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Alan7140

I prefer to photograph live insects where I find them, Thomas.

 

While it may not be possible to achieve the phenomenal technical perfection and detail that some achieve with studio set-ups, there's something about getting down in the dirt with the live insect that appeals to me. I was extremely lucky to get this little wolf holding still enough for long enough to get the shot.

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everything positive is already written, I just want to applaude for your technical skills and your ideas how to manage this, as well as your understanding of nature together with the cabability to show it in your pictures

Thomas

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wildoat

Alan the detail when viewed large is mighty impressive  :D

Great work, thanks for sharing the technicals.

 

Mother nature really has to be the best designer there is, amazing little creature!

 

tony

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Alan7140

Thanks, Tony & Thomas (56 DIN).

 

Of course the full size version (nearly three times bigger) holds even more nuances, although that moved leg is then equally more obvious.

 

I also like that my silhouette with the late evening sun low behind my left shoulder and the branches of my oak tree spreading over upper right are visible reflected in the eye facing me:

(1:1)

GZAZA8a.jpg

 

(Click through to "view full size" - the forum software has turned this embedded image and first clicked preview window to mush)

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Alan7140

I was a bit cautious of spiders when I lived in a city, but once I moved into bush and rural areas I grew accustomed to them, observing very quickly that most spiders are scared almost to death of you and will do anything to get away rather than attack.

 

I say "most" as you soon learn that there are a few that behave exactly the opposite and deliberately try to sink the fangs in. The trick is learning which is which, so Huntsmen in particular are welcome to hang around my walls and deal with everything else of the insect world - including other less friendly spiders - whereas funnel-web and white-tail spiders immediately get shown the door (or sole of the boot, more likely).

 

I'm particularly fond of Huntsmen as they don't leave trails of cobweb all over the place, although their sudden appearance in the corner of your vision at unexpected times can cause a bit of a reflexive start. However they usually come in when rain is approaching, so that's a good sign (particularly around here at the moment - it's been awfully dry this year and late last year).

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crowecg

Hairy — with knobs on (or spikes anyway)! I wonder if all spiders have spines on their legs?

.

Looking through my spider pictures, it seems hairy legs are common, but not so the spikes - even among other wolf spiders.

I abhor unethical treatment of invertebrates for photography reasons.

I do keep them alive in my shots, but they can be quite lively if you want to get stacks for greater depth of field. Perhaps someone will sone come out with an in-camera stacking system one day.

Edited by crowecg
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