Jump to content
FrankF

Volunteers at church

Recommended Posts

Ai-S 1.4/35mm @1.4

 

post-546-0-38215600-1456938727_thumb.jpg

  • Like 2

Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a great photo, Frank! Well done! Fantastic B&W conversion too. It's going up next on the #Inspiration column (but right now I need some rest, so first thing in the morning). 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Superbly done, Frank. You are wringing the best from that lens, I'm truly envious as it defeated me when I had it, as I've mentioned before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dallas. I fell honored.

 

Alan. It is more the way I talk to people has changed. People seem to trust me more.

 

post-546-0-18607600-1456958958_thumb.jpg

  • Like 2

Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're being too modest, Frank - that first shot is outstanding beyond what simple rapport between photographer and subject alone could produce.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you.


Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As others have said, Frank - that first shot just moves you!  The composition, the look on the people's faces.  Excellent work and am so glad you shared it and the others in the series with us!

 

One of my favorites from you!  :D

  • Like 1

Nikon D500, D700, Df, 18-140/3.5-5.6 VR, 20/2.8D, 28-105/3.5-4.5D, 50/1.8D, 60/2.8D Macro, 80-200/4.5-5.6, 300/4E PF, 35/2D,  Tamron 70-200/2.8 VC

Manual Focus Lenses:  Nikon 55/3.5 Micro pre-AI, 105/2.5 AI, ZY Mitakon Creator 85/2

Olympus PEN-F, EM5.2, Olympus 9mm f/8 Fisheye, 17/1.8, 75-300/4.8-6.7 II, Panasonic 12-32/3.5-5.6, 12-35/2.8, 35-100/2.8, Sigma 60mm f/2.8 DN Art, ZY Mitakon 25/0.95
 

http://www.bestlightphoto.net | http://www.visualohio.com | http://bestlightphoto.blogspot.com | Flickr | SCEENEINWINDOWS Project

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad to see this images on the inspired by column

 

#1 is as said a superb image, and the people look relaxed , the 35mm includes more than the person , also the surroundings, and in this image it all works together, not a simple fit to accomplish with a wide angle, I mean combine portrait with the whole scenario.

 

3 more  things worthy of mentioning:

  • the ambient light in #1 works really well
  • the lens is manual focus,  and the focus is correct even when using a fairly wide aperture, not something I can do easily
  • the conversion to b&w is very pleasant

 

 

Thanks for sharing it Frank, truly an image to be inspired by


Regards,

Armando

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your kind words, Armando, Andrew.

 

Dallas: I am honored with yet another POTW from my daily workout. I try hard currently to take a significant portait per day.

 

The 35/1.4 Ai-S is really hard to focus @1.4 ... BUT: the way the lens draws is very forgiving, and the way I edit for an extra analogue look adds to that. So: If I hit the lips or the nose more than the eyes it does not hurt so much.


Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mongo is quite starting to notice a Frank "style" in these images. It is distinctive and appealing.

 

The only CC Mongo can offer is about the darkness of the eyes in #1. The conditions were extreme but it is a small shame the eyes were not just a hint lighter. Mongo tried this edit at home and it seems to almost change his charter a little. Not sure if that is closer to his character or the other way but it is a little different in its overall feel.

 

Forgot to mention that he light diffusion pattern on the bench top is just great !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mongo. The darkness in the eyes stems from the edit. In the color version eyes are more prominent.

The composition is though more focussed on the body language. That is where his calm and friendly expression comes from. The eyes do not contribute much to the impression. I will show my color version later.

Thank you for stopping by.

  • Like 1

Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here is the crop / head only:

 

post-546-0-90861800-1457174761_thumb.jpg

 

 

One can also see that it is very hard to nail focus @1.4. I feel the shirt is much sharper than the eyes.


Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although, Ann, the 1.4/35 Ai-S does not have AF.

 

I think though you might mean that the "green dot" does not show what really is the case.


Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That lens is extremely difficult to focus wide-open. The various optical flaws are at full flight there, the image looking soft and flared under most conditions which really hinders focussing. Unfortunately I sold my copy before Fuji introduced focus peaking so was unable to see if that helped define the sharp point when adapted, but through the D3 and D3s viewfinders that I actually used this lens with, primarily for multi-stacked & stitched panos 35mm is the best focal length for those, I reckon) it was a complete mongrel to focus.

 

Designed in the film era I guess the problem wasn't so prominent with the excellent viewfinders that Nikon equipped their F cameras with (the 35/1.4 AI-s appeared much more usable through my F4's viewfinder), along with the lesser acutance of the films that this lens was used with in its primarily journalistic roles (and in which use it gained its "legendary" status), but with the coming of digital Nikon definitely went backwards in the viewfinder stakes and this lens became a very difficult thing to master indeed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ann: I might have green-dottet the eyes and then recomposed...


Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan: The F4 finder was excellent. The F4 was the ONE manual focus camera that stood out because of its terrific view finder!

 

Yes, I know the F4 was AF, but I tried it and decided not to use this feature.


Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frank: The  D2x fixed, small, dim finder was a rude shock to me compared to that brilliant and versatile viewfinder in the F4. The F4's detachable prism (I also had a waist-level finder for it which made copy stand use so easy) and easily changed screens with several optional choices made the camera incredibly versatile - the sort of features one expects should be on a flagship pro camera, but have now disappeared from everything other than maybe a few medium format cameras.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

/offtopic continued/

 

The DX-Format, Alan, meant: the holes that allow light to enter the camera are much smaller than in a 24x36-Film camera

 

The other Problem with DX for me was a psychological: I do not have to lift the camera to know where to stand shooting 24, 35, 50, 60, 85, 105, 135. I guess I am well above 500.000 clicks in 33 years. Suddenly the lenses I was used to meant something else.

 

That combined with the dark whole unprecise viewfinder meant I needed nearly one year to be secure in hadling these new thinggies.

 

I needed 3 Shots to be up and running, ... at home ... with the D3. The D3 was for me very much lieke a reincarnation of the F4.

 

Main difference: my wife was pretty comfortable with the F4 and took many great shots with it, but not with the F100 or D3 or any other DSLR I owned since the D70.

 

I also loved the huge knob to set the time. It was a very specially designed knob, very ergonomically.


Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By visiting this website you are agreeing to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy & Guidelines.