Jump to content
wildoat

FujiX-T1and 50-140/2.8 zoom, any opinions please.

Recommended Posts

I'm seriously considering this combination, I know it's mirrorless but from what I've been reading the Xt1

could offer me great performance in a very convenient package.

Also the purchase of the 16-55 f2.8 would make a great two lens kit!

 

I'm anticipating more travel type photography(Europe), the smaller kit would be less of a hindrance

and far more portable especially when traveling by motorcycle.

 

Any thoughts much appreciated.

 

cheers

tony

Edited by wildoat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I was planning big travel and to travel 'light', I'd have no hesitation to acquire a small kit of Fujifilm X cameras/lenses.

This is based on my experience of using a Fuji XE-1(one of the early models, before all the kinks were worked out) plus two lenses(14mm and 23mm) for the past 2.5 years.

Newer models, such as the XT-1 and presumably the new XPro-2 are better. 

Alan can tell you about the XT-1 and the 50-140.

Edited by pluton

Keith B.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends if you're of a mind to use Adobe product to process the Fuji raw files. In other words, to get the best out of Fuji files you'll need to train yourself in another raw processor such as Photo Ninja, C-1, Iridient, RPP.... in fact nearly anything other than LR or ACR. Fuji does have a good name for in-camera jpeg with a menu of film simulations to choose from, but I can't comment on that as I always shoot raw only.

 

Once you step over that Adobe barrier, though, the Fuji is a sweet handling little camera that is reliable, tough as nails and familiar to use for anyone who cut their teeth on a 35mm film camera - the controls are where they should be.

 

The 50-140 lens is the best zoom lens I have ever used, which puts it at the top of the Fuji line-up (and pretty much any other competitor's offerings, for that matter). It's neither small nor light in the scheme of the rest of Fuji's lenses, but still much smaller and lighter than its 135 equivalents.

 

The OIS is a thing to be marvelled at - I've regularly and successfully hand-held shots at 140mm with a shutter speed of 1/20sec, which is just nuts when applied to conventional rules and expectations regarding that angle of view.

Adding the 1.4x converter adds almost nothing to the physical length of the lens when fitted (just 14mm) but gives an appreciable increase in optical reach, and would be a very handy addition to any travel kit. The TC itself is compact (about 40mm long with caps fitted) and takes almost no room in a bag. It has no impact on IQ that I've seen made obvious, in fact I doubt I could tell a shot taken with the 1.4x fitted from one without.

 

Consider the 18-55/2.8-4 instead of the 16-55/2.8 for a travelling companion - it is lighter, a good deal smaller and more importantly has OIS whereas the 16-50/2.8 does not, which makes the 18-55 effectively better in low light overall. It isn't WR tough, so that may be the deal breaker for bike-based touring.

 

The other lens (also not WR) to consider would be the  10-24, which gives crazy ultra-wide angle possibilities along with a handy zoom range to medium-wide.

 

If I were restricted to two lenses only and not too concerned about WR my travel kit would be the 50-140/2.8 & 1.4TC, along with the 10-24/4 OIS. The lack of WR on the wide has never really concerned me as it is not so big that you can't easily shield it, and I carry a small plastic baggie with it's bottom slit open and an elastic band for attachment as a lens poncho for when things get bad enough, which thankfully isn't often here. I understand that Europe can be a different matter, though. :)

 

As far as overall weight and size goes compared with a DSLR kit - well there is no real comparison to be made. Even with what is currently Fuji's largest lens in the 50-140/2.8, the whole thing is compact enough (23cm long fitted to body) to fit into a small bag or waist pouch, and is light enough to carry for long distances without physical discomfort setting in.

 

Be aware that you'll probably have to get two or three spare batteries - with everything being electronic it does get through the power quicker than a DSLR, but the batteries are small and flat and are no bother carried in a pocket, and changing is quick and easy.

 

Several of my most recent posts have been taken with the 50-140 with 1.4x TC fitted (including a recent close-up of a couple of bees feeding in a red flowering gum's blooms in Botany thread), and processed in Photo Ninja, which will give you an idea of the IQ. It'll be pretty obvious which posts of mine use that lens - anything that looks telephoto, in fact, as it's my only long lens after the 90/2, which doesn't get used much at all at the moment.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan,

 

Hi, hope all is good with you, haven't spoken in a while!

I did manage to find some threads here where you gave your opinion on this lens, it seems to be an outstanding piece(many pieces) of glass.

Ephotozine reviewed it and were extremely impressed, image quality wise I think it's as good as any zoom I've ever seen reviewed, if not the best.

https://www.ephotozine.com/article/fujifilm-fujinon-xf-50-140mm-f-2-8-r-lm-ois-wr-lens-review-26748

 

I do use Adobe products occasionally, I'm really not bothered about having to use something else for the Fuji, I'm prepared to learn whatever gives the best results.

 

Interesting what you have to say about the 18-55, it's slightly slower speed compared with the 16-55 is not an issue providing image

quality is still good! It's cheaper too, that's always a consideration.

 

I've recently parted company with lots of my larger Nikon kit, after twenty five years of being a slave to the larger format

(slightly larger) I feel it's time to be liberated and start enjoying the freedom the more portable alternatives can offer.

I've looked long and hard at most of the options and the Fuji XT-1 seems to offer most of what I'm looking for and although I want to downsize I'm not prepared to compromise completely on image quality, the Fuji seems to be excellent in that regard.

I didn't realise quite how good their image stabilisation is, that will open up opportunities for sure. 

As far as batteries are concerned, that's no hardship they seem to be very reasonably priced.

In all I'm quite excited by the prospect of being able to take my camera gear wherever I want without the practical considerations

I've had with my Nikon kit.

I'll search out some more of your recent posts, I'm keen to see what's possible with the fuji.

 

Cheers for now and thanks very much for your helpful suggestions.

 

tony

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tony, for travelling in Europe I find the X-T1 and 18-55 are an excellent, light weight combination which covers a large range of shooting opportunities.  I have less use for a tele-zoom, but it is always good to have this available just in case.  The 18-55 is a very good performer indeed but has some barrel distortion at the wide end.  This is easily corrected in pp (I use PT Lens for this).  I have felt no need to buy the 16-55.

 

When in European cities I find I get a lot of use out of the 14mm.  I agree that the 10-24 is more versatile, but I like the light weight and simplicity of the prime.  This is obviously a personal matter.

 

You may have seen the announcement of the X-Pro 2, with a new sensor.  This is expected to be followed by the X-T2 in six months or so.  If you can wait this would probably be worth it.  If you cannot, X-T1 prices are dropping as people anticipate the new version.

 

One other thing - you will want to keep some Nikon gear for your sports and other action photography.  This is not a strong area for the X-T1.  The new version later this year may cause a reassessment of this.

 

I am sure you will enjoy your new lightweight equipment - it is such a pleasure not to be weighed down by heavy gear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tony, the f/4 slowness of the18-55 is only towards the long end, and if you have the 50-140/2.8, you have that covered anyway! ;)

 

Admittedly 18mm is not as wide as 16mm, (in fact in APS-C land this 2mm is more of a difference than you'd expect after coming from FX), but from a traveller's point of view the 18-55 is tiny, and it certainly doesn't disappoint in image quality (like all of Fuji's XF lenses).

 

If you haven't already done so, when you actually see and hold the 50-140/2.8 you will probably be a bit taken aback with its almost unexpected weight and size in comparison to the other Fuji gear, but the weather sealed construction probably had as much to do with this outcome as anything, what with internal focussing and constant length design to better enable this. The quality of construction really is peerless, though - the lens feels bulletproof and the control rings are weighted with just the right amount of resistance in the focus and zoom rings and firm but not rough or stiff detents in the aperture ring.

 

Whatever small and unexpected drawbacks there might be at first after being used to big, plastic-coated lumps I think once you get used to photography no longer being a workout session you'll warm to this equipment as I have - literally for the first time since the world went stupid with digital I have a camera outfit that I enjoy using to the point that I always carry it with me. My Nikon bag used to stay at home unless I actually needed to use it, which is hardly either an endorsement or indication of usefulness.

 

One thing to add - get an L-plate (SunwayFoto do a good one) for the camera. Not only does it give added protection to the bottom and one side of the already-strong camera, it gives your right pinky a place to park - in standard trim the small body leaves the finger grasping thin air, but the L bracket solves this, as well as being the usual mandatory tripod-attachment plate adapter. You can add the finger grip extension as well, but I've found that unnecessary - the camera grip itself protrudes far enough to carry the camera resting on one's fingertips hanging by your side, any further extension just adds bulk.

For me the swap has also been financially painless - with the last of my Nikon gear now sold, I still have change enough credit left for probably another Fuji body or new lens - plus I have also received good trade-in prices on a couple of Fuji lenses that I simply wasn't using - the 14/2.8 which I ceased to carry in favour of the brilliant 10-24/4 OIS, and the 55-200 which was rendered redundant by the 50-140 & 1.4xTC. So effectively no cash has yet changed hands between me and my supplier - I sent him used Nikon (and now Fuji) stuff, he return-mailed new Fuji stuff. Too easy!

 

Happy travelling!

 

Alan.

Edited by Alan7140

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know several landscape photographers who have sold off Nikon and gone Fuji.   When they moved to Fuji they also moved from LR/PS to C!P.  They all swear by using C1P.   


Olympus OM-D EM-1 II, 60mm Macro, 7-14mm Pro, 12-40mm Pro, 40-150mm Pro, 300mm Pro

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tony, Anthony, Alan and Vivion I now have to tell you that you've all been a terribly bad influence on me and my poor distressed wallet that I've bitten the bullet and ordered an XT-1 graphite version, naughty boys!

 

I've been impressed by the quality of images from various Fuji posters, that and part of the reason was to lighten my load, and have been looking at the various CSC systems(?) i.e. Sony, Olympus but have plumped for the Fuji system. I was quite impressed when I met up with Anthony in London and was able to handle his even if only briefly his XT-1!

 

I have also ordered the 18-55mm, other stuff well may follow if this experiment is successful I shall be using my Nikon gear to fund the change over and also maybe an XT-2 when the time comes!

 

It will be a wrench to get rid of the Nikon gear but hey ho only if the experiment is good. 

 

Regards chaps

Edited by Mike G
  • Like 1

Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When you see how much easier a mirrorless camera makes your life you will wonder why on earth more people aren't using them, Mike. Welcome aboard the new generation! :) 

 

I have been in touch with the local Fujifilm people to see if I can get a test unit. I am very interested to see how the X-T1 compares with the Oly E-M1 - not too many people writing about that comparison. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dallas, Fuji have always had a very good reputation for its lenses which was part of what swayed me, we shall see!

 

Dallas try this.http://newcameranews.com/2014/02/24/fuji-x-t1-versus-olympus-om-d-e-m1/

Edited by Mike G

Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tony, Anthony, Alan and Vivion I now have to tell you that you've all been a terribly bad influence on me and my poor distressed wallet that I've bitten the bullet and ordered an XT-1 graphite version, naughty boys!

 

I've been impressed by the quality of images from various Fuji posters, that and part of the reason was to lighten my load, and have been looking at the various CSC systems(?) i.e. Sony, Olympus but have plumped for the Fuji system. I was quite impressed when I met up with Anthony in London and was able to even if only briefly his XT-1!

 

I have also ordered the 18-55mm, other stuff well may follow if this experiment is successful using my Nikon gear to fund the change over and also maybe an XT-2 when the time comes!

 

It will be a wrench to get rid of the Nikon gear but hey ho only if the experiment is good. 

 

Regards chaps

Congratulations, Mike! There is a bit of a learning curve, but I am sure you will enjoy Fuji photography.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anthony thanks, isn't there always a learning curve for any new bit of kit!  It is of course primarily your fault.  :yes:

 

If I decide to go the Fuji way I have a shed load of gear to PX for more stuff, and I expect to be asking lots of questions in the near future, but hey that is one of the beauties of FZ so many people such as your good self who are only too willing to pass on their knowledge and experiences! 

 

i have chosen the Graphite version just to be a bit different.  : :)

 

I do like the Nikon gear but it do weigh a ton and these ageing shoulders will appreciate the loss of some weight!

Edited by Mike G

Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry Viv I missed your post. Apparently the Graphite version has some improvements over the standard model, not sure what though!

In my case perhaps it should be the "Grey" side on many fronts.  :D

 

Getting a new camera is always an excitement, and as it will be delivered on Monday already I'm getting impatient. hopefully the experiment will go well and I can sort some more stuff out before I go on holiday. 

 

Until early April I seem to almost a permanent resident at my local hospital having the very necessary Chemo, bloody nuisance but so vital for me, hey ho.

 

I like the cockney reference.  :yes:

  • Like 1

Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bless you Ann it is Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma which the medicos tell me is treatable and curable, luckily seems to have been caught at an early stage(1) so I think the chemo is the failsafe option, two treatments down and four to go, three weekly intervals hence the long time with blood tests every week. Phew

 

But I'm not going to let it beat me.

 

Many thanks for the kind thoughts.

Edited by Mike G
  • Like 1

Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gob-smacked I may well be, because to say that this is unexpected to hear is a complete understatement, Mike!

 

Be patient with the learning curve you are about to experience, and while it's obviously something you've read here repeatedly, avoid raw processing with Adobe's raw processors - you will be let down in your expectations. Photo Ninja is still the quickest and easiest processor I've used for X-Trans (I can't use Iridient or RPP as I don't have a Mac), but getting off on the best foot with something that works well rather than something mediocre is a good starting point.

 

That said, you will also probably have read from those who didn't warm to Fuji, but if you warm to the system as others like me have you are in for a very pleasant experience indeed.

 

The Graphite is a beautiful looking camera, and to be honest I'm thinking my next X-T should have that finish. Nought wrong with a bit of bling, eh? The 18-55/2.8-4 OIS is a very competent lens that belies its small size, and is one I have chosen to keep as well rather than buy the bigger premium AW 16-55/2.8 (which inexplicably doesn't have the briliant OIS).

 

Originally the Graphite body did have features the standard X-T1 didn't have (such as the electronic shutter,) but Fuji later updated the older body to similar functionality via free firmware update. In true Fuji fashion they reduced the price of the Graphite somewhat when they brought the older bodies up to spec, although it is still dearer as that special finish is a complicated extra manufacturing step.

 

Be aware that firmware updates happen semi-regularly (every 6 months or so), and each time it's almost like getting a new camera again for the added features they add. Copy and bookmark the following link to save the search, and check every now and then. Also check your new camera and lenses have the latest firmware when you get them, and note that at the end of January there's a new update due which addresses AF improvements (amongst other things).

http://www.fujifilm.com/support/digital_cameras/software/fw_table.html

 

Hold down the Disp/Back button when turning on the camera and the firmware version of the body and lens fitted at the time will be displayed on the LCD, so checking is easy.

 

If my experience is any guide, you're in for an enjoyable ride with Fuji that's a real change from using DSLR. The weight loss is an obvious thing, but the size, handling and quietness of using the camera are equally inspirational in encouraging one to carry the thing everywhere, which is really the point of the camera, the best one being the one you have with you, not the one left at home because of weight/size/presence. :)

 

You will certainly have questions, but no problem, ask away when you do! Plenty of help is available in this place.

Edited by Alan7140
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats Mike on your decision for a Fuji camera. I'm sure you won't regret it.

You'll certainly find good support in this forum.

Wishing your health getting better soon.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope all goes well with the chemo, and the follow up.  

Edited by Anthony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be sure to let us know how you are doing, both with the treatment and with the new camera, Mike.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had two friends with that version of the disease, and they both pulled through fine - and are still going strong years later. I do recall that the treatment was less than pleasant, so all the best for that to be over and done with as little discomfort as possible.

 

No doubt the X-T1 will help take your mind off it in the meantime :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Fuji X-E2 my favourite travel camera:
 

 

post-2350-0-09527400-1452928525_thumb.jp

post-2350-0-11768500-1452928545_thumb.jp

post-2350-0-85502100-1452928568_thumb.jp

post-2350-0-16333700-1452928779_thumb.jp

Edited by aerobat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for messages of support, so so kind. Luckily I'm an upbeat sort of geezer and nearly always look on the bright side of life(where have I heard that before!) onward and upward eh!

 

Alan super reply as usual from you, I fear you may get awfully bored with me asking questions, good job you live over the other side of the world or I'd camp outside your house.  :yes:

 

The Fuji camp seems to be on the rise and a burgeoning gang is appearing to populate these pages, rock on.

 

Alan I note what you say about PN(silly name) and will investigate via the free trial shortly! fingers itching to get hold of the beast on Monday sometime, till then frustration is setting in, I'm also very impatient.  ::) I've already down loaded the manual so at least I'v got something to read.

 

God bless you all, stand by for the questions. Cheers Mike

  • Like 1

Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I need to apologise to Tony I seem to be guilty of taking over his post a bit, sorry mate.  :blush:


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan I note what you say about PN(silly name) and will investigate via the free trial shortly! fingers itching to get hold of the beast on Monday sometime, till then frustration is setting in, I'm also very impatient.  ::) I've already down loaded the manual so at least I'v got something to read.

 

If you are still keeping Aperture running on your iMac, Apple's RAW converter seems to be better than Adobe products until you learn some other programme.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Crowecg yep I still have Aperture, so I'll give it a go!


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I need to apologise to Tony I seem to be guilty of taking over his post a bit, sorry mate. :blush:

Hey Mike, don't be daft, your contribution has added to the discussion some interesting points and

helpful posts posts from others, so thanks for that.

It's interesting we both seem to have had similar thoughts re our camera equipment around the same time.

I really hope your treatment goes as well as possible and you don't feel too poorly.

I'm sure your positive attitude will see you through this.

All the very best

Tony

Edited by wildoat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By visiting this website you are agreeing to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy & Guidelines.