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Nikon D5 costs more than a VW Up in South Africa

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I just heard that the local dealer price for a Nikon D5 (body only) is R131,000. You can buy a brand new VW Up base model for a little bit less than that. Or if you're inclined to buy cheaper you'll get a brand new Kia Picanto for about R120,000. 

 

Wow. 

 

I don't know how it compares with prices in other countries, but I don't know how Nikon SA are going to find buyers for their top line machine at those prices. Crazy. 

 

VW-Up-Hbrid-1_jpg_2740211b.jpg

 

nikon_1557_d5_dslr_camera_body_1214152.j

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D5 or a week at Sabi-Sabi including airfare and money left over......

Or, you can get a D500 plus a week at Sabi-Sabi.....plus some money toward your airfare.

Edited by fredazinger
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I saw that one of the guests coming to us for UB5 this year has already got their air ticket from Delta for around $1400 return, so yeah, it's really cheap for you guys to come here right now. What does the D500 cost? 

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I'd rather have the VW Up. Small, light, manoeuvrable. Not like the D5.

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I disagree on that, Ann. Even if I could afford a D5 I do not see any discernible advantage it will give me over the Olympus E-M1 for the kind of work I do. The only thing it will do better is high-ISO and AF-C. Everything else is moot as far as this professional photographer is concerned because it won't add anything to my bottom line at all. 

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I'll be willing to bet that the majority of D5 buyers are not professional photographers but rather well heeled enthusiasts, or semi-pro weekend photographers. 

 

Also, remember that most professional cameras these days are well capable of withstanding just as much abuse as the pro spec DSLR's. Unless you're planning on getting all Jeremy Clarkson on them, in which case they'll all wilt! 

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The price does not shock me and would not deter me.

 

I don't need this camera. I am not a pro or even a wannabe pro. The job would not pay me enough.

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BTW, I don't drive a VW Up!

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A propos light weight, I picked up my D700 yesterday for the first time in months (with 60 mm lens attached) and was absolutely shocked at its weight. I have been spoiled by Fuji ...

 

The D700 will be gone in two weeks, with the rest of what remains of my Nikon gear (two lenses and a flash).

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Ann, I agree with you. Horses for courses. I would not like a camera that is better at photography than I am!

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It's the local price that shocks me. That is really a lot for a camera body. You can completely equip yourself with either Sony, Fujifilm or Olympus top end equipment for much less than that.

From a photography business perspective, you'd be able to claim depreciation of around 20% a year, so your main question (if you are buying one for business purposes and not to satisfy the GAS) is whether the acquisition will benefit your business' bottom line. Otherwise it's a capital expense that may prove difficult to justify. I'm speaking from a South African perspective where photography income is very different to what it is in the first world.

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Here in Norway the D5 is less than half the price of a VW Up base model. NOK 69k vs 147k.

My D810 would cost 32K these days, and I'll keep mine for a few more years.

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I might stand corrected but my contact told me that the R131k was a dealer price, which would exclude 14% VAT and whatever the dealer decides to add on top of the dealer price (usually 5-10%). That puts the camera into super-elite territory if its true.

 

I simply can't see the average pro here shelling out even half of that for their primary tool. In real terms it would be about double what I earned from photography last year. Granted, I don't do weddings, so those guys might have a sniff at it, but knowing quite a few of them from these parts I just don't see it being back-ordered in SA...

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NOK 69k (VAT included) is about ZAR 129k so that's not far off.

 

The real problem is the insane taxes on cars in Norway.

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I'll be willing to bet that the majority of D5 buyers are not professional photographers but rather well heeled enthusiasts, or semi-pro weekend photographers. 

 

Also, remember that most professional cameras these days are well capable of withstanding just as much abuse as the pro spec DSLR's. Unless you're planning on getting all Jeremy Clarkson on them, in which case they'll all wilt! 

I believe this to be true.  The semi pro guys get an immediate tax write off for their gear, car expense and home office expense.  They take a loss against their day job.

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Well if this is what your photos of cameras look like, I just can't wait to see what your photos of fishermens catchs will look like!

 

(I suspect that PS has a lot to answer for.)

 

:D :D :D

 

 

If you thought D5 is expensive, wait for D8000.    

 

To carry it you need a VW van or a sherpa.   

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As long as buying one doesn't prevent you from being able to join safaris in the future I'm all for you getting one. :) 

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The only downside I can think of is that you may have a perpetual smirk on your face! :D 

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Just got to see the Australian price - A$9000. Unfortunately VW Up is not in the Australian line up at the moment - it was available a year or two back. Anyway, the current cheapest new car I could identify is Mitsubishi Mirage for A$12,000 - that means you can get a 24-70/2.8 with the D5 for the price of a car.

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$9,000 was inevitable. Nikon's responses to currency movements are entirely predictable, and are like Oil Company philosophy - when the currency gains value against the US$, don't drop the price to reflect this, when it loses value, increase the price immediately to the full value, or more, than the currency value lost.

 

For $9K you could buy a full-house Fuji X-T1, lenses and accessories outfit. So just a so-so D5 & a couple of lenses kit will do around $15K plus, which is bonkers.

 

Same is happening with cars, particularly that the Australian car industry is now all but finished. I'm so glad I bought my (imported) car when the $ was near parity - the replacement model is now nearly $20K dearer.

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I can buy a decent, properly equipped, used Land Rover Defender (V8, TD5 or 300TDi) for less than the cost of a new Nikon D5.

 

I have developed an unhealthy obsession with those vehicles in the past year. My friends all think I am nuts and are trying to convince me to buy a Toyota instead, but because of the high risk associated with the Japanese marque in SA, I'd put them last on the list of adventure vehicles I will consider. 

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If you have not yet had sufficient "Sticker Shock", check out the price of the Canon flag-ship Pro cameras!

 

:blink: :blink: : :)

Will never ever buy Canon. They made my lenses obsolete when they changed the mount. I had a Canon A-1 and assorted lenses at the time.

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If you thought D5 is expensive, wait for D8000.    

 

To carry it you need a VW van or a sherpa.   

Or use a VW Up!?

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I can buy a decent, properly equipped, used Land Rover Defender (V8, TD5 or 300TDi) for less than the cost of a new Nikon D5.

 

I have developed an unhealthy obsession with those vehicles in the past year. My friends all think I am nuts and are trying to convince me to buy a Toyota instead, but because of the high risk associated with the Japanese marque in SA, I'd put them last on the list of adventure vehicles I will consider. 

Don't want to put you off, but my Land Rover (bought new) was the worst vehicle I ever owned. It leaked diesel fuel (not oil) copiously from day one. Repaired many times under warranty, the problem always returned within a week.

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