Jump to content
Dallas

Your favourite film camera?

Recommended Posts

This is a hard question to answer because I had so many of them over the years! 

 

I would have to say that my absolute favourite to use was the Leica M3. My only problem with that camera was that the M3 only had guidelines for 50/90/135mm lenses and my favourite focal length is 35mm. It could take the 35mm lenses but you needed to have the ones with the "goggles" which looked a little weird on those bodies. 

 

I also had a black Leica M6 which had a built in meter and looked really nice, but it definitely wasn't built as well as the M3 was. 

 

On the SLR front I think it would probably be a toss-up between the Nikon FM2n and the Canon A-1. I still have an A-1 in perfect working condition. It may be time to take it out and get some frames shot! 

 

What was your favourite film camera? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In order:

1. Hasselblad.

2. Olympus OM-1.

3. Nikon F4

 

The rest I had more of a hate-love than a love-hate relationship with, although I still own both an RB67 & RZ67 and next to the Hasselblad I probably used that camera type the most in my career, I've just never warmed to using them (although the results are certainly excellent). Big, fat, heavy and awkward, and basically just unpleasant to use.

 

I also has a Mamiya M645 for many years after selling my first Hasselblad outfit (which became incompatible with the equipment at the studio I worked for when it switched to Pentax 6x7 and Mamiya M645), and that was a tinny piece of junk, although the lenses were OK (but nowhere near as good as the Hasselblad). The M645 is to this day the only camera body I had blister with rust even though it never got wet.

 

I did like using my Toyo Field 45A camera, but even though I still have it I have sold my two favourite lenses for it through lack of use (Rodenstock 65mm Grandagon & 240mm Sironar-N), so I'll probably never use it again.

 

There's something about a Hasselblad  & 250mm lens that works magic, both with people:

C7oqbSn.jpg

(Michelle, 2002)

 

and with animals:

Gub1x2D.jpg

(Deer in Velvet, 1997)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dallas, similar to you there were many for various reasons. However, the absolute the most joyous and rewarding (personally and commercially) was the Leica M3. I eventually wore the shutter brake beyond repair/rebuild. I bought it very well used and had it rebuilt with single stroke film advance, x-syncs for strobe and shutter work - it took three major breakdowns to do it but it just wore out. I still have my Sekonic Studio Delux (selenium) meter that I got after guessing Tri-X exposures for several years - learned a bunch with that incident meter.

 

From there it was the M6 and a sense of liberation with the built in light meter 

 

Now the only film body I have left is a Nikon FM3a.


Best Regards,

Roger

X-Pro2 } 18-55mm | 35mm f/2 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 OM1

2 FM2

3 F4s

I still have a F801 just in case and just one lens. She cannot stop down AFS. A rare well centered version of the AF 24/f=2.8. My dream for film would be the F6. Alas: I do not dream of film anymore. The only thing I would do with film is black & white with own wet studio. So this is hypothetically. I did never like the wet lab.

I was a slide guy!


Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are awesome photographs, Alan. I was looking through a book of Rock & Roll photography that was put together by Graham Nash (of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young fame) on the weekend and showing my younger son the awesome B&W quality of some of those images that were shot using old manual cameras in the 50's, 60's and 70's. Those guys back then often didn't even have film that went much beyond ISO 400 yet they were able to produce outstanding work in rooms with little light. True heroes of image making in my view. 

 

Roger, my M3 I bought from an estate at a ridiculously low price of around $250 at the time and it came with the 50mm and 90mm Summicrons. I got a 135mm later. So I had this camera for about a month and then one day I had my little camera bag on the back seat of my Ford Ranger, opened the suicide door and it dropped about half a meter onto concrete. It didn't seem like much of a drop but it managed to separate the prisms in the rangefinder, resulting in a complete blackout that rendered the camera useless. 

 

I took it to a local guy who found a person in Johannesburg who could repair the rangefinder, which he did, as well as refurbishing the vulcanite. It was a thing of beauty when I got it back! Sadly had to sell it a few years later when my business was going through terminal down-scaling. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Canon T90 and its slide-friendly multispot metering. Plus smooth curves...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My four film cameras are the Olympus OM-1N, OM-3Ti, OM-4Ti and OM-2 Spot/Program.

Olympus OM-3Ti and OM-4Ti both feature multi-spot metering.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nikon F and F2 with the non-meter prism finders.  More simple, you cannot get.

After having a small set of Contax RTS cams and lenses for two years, I then wished I could get  Zeiss lenses that worked on Nikon bodies.

Edited by pluton

Keith B.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All Nikons.

Meterless F, F2AS, F3P, FA, FM2, and FG (all motorized), SP rangefinder, S3 rangefinder, Cosina R2S Bessa rangefinder.


I shoot film. That's film. F...i....l....m. You remember film don't you? It was in all the papers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I shot with Canon during the film era. My favourite was F1n with motor drive - still in fully functional condition. A-1 was nice as well but F1n is more robust and works perfectly in cold conditions (below -20 C). A-1 froze at -10 C


Erkki

D3s, D3, D200, D70
FX: Nikon 14-24/2.8G, 20/1.8G, 24-70/2.8G, 28/1.8G, 70-200/2.8G VR, 300/2.8G VR1, 200-400/4G VR2, 60/2.8D+105/2.8D micro, 85/1.4G, 16/2.8D, 50/1.4G, 500/8 reflex C, Sigma 8/3.5 EX, 12-24 EX, 150/2.8 OS EX...
TC: TC-14 E II, TC-17 E II, TC-20 E III
DX: 10.5/2.8, 18-70, 18-200
4*SB800's, R1C1 kit with 3*SB-R200, YN-622 kit (TX+4*RC)...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my case it would be the Canon T90, and the the Contax G2.

 

Agree with Airee the multi spot facility of the T90 was good!


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For all those who never shot the OM-System: They were and still are the cameras that offer very small package with huge optical viewfinder. I loved the mechanical MUP on the OM1. I shot half hour with Schwarztschild tables for correction and the Gossen Lunarsix3s to know what I am doing.

Today it is Physics Engineering instead of Chemistry Mechanic Engineering.

The real task for the photographer though is to DESIGN.

This has not changed a bit.


Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No order:

 

Nikon F3, Leica M4-P, Hasselblad 500C/M.  Leica cameras were great, but I had to stop using the system because the internal lens coatings were prone to fog too easily under the humid climate.


"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cut my teeth seriously on the Nikon N90s... But then went digital.

I also enjoy using my Yashica 5000, and the Mamiya C33.


Nikon D500, D700, Df, 18-140/3.5-5.6 VR, 20/2.8D, 28-105/3.5-4.5D, 50/1.8D, 60/2.8D Macro, 80-200/4.5-5.6, 300/4E PF, 35/2D,  Tamron 70-200/2.8 VC

Manual Focus Lenses:  Nikon 55/3.5 Micro pre-AI, 105/2.5 AI, ZY Mitakon Creator 85/2

Olympus PEN-F, EM5.2, Olympus 9mm f/8 Fisheye, 17/1.8, 75-300/4.8-6.7 II, Panasonic 12-32/3.5-5.6, 12-35/2.8, 35-100/2.8, Sigma 60mm f/2.8 DN Art, ZY Mitakon 25/0.95
 

http://www.bestlightphoto.net | http://www.visualohio.com | http://bestlightphoto.blogspot.com | Flickr | SCEENEINWINDOWS Project

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nikkormat FT3, Nikon F100, and Nikon FM2nT were the three I liked the best. 

 

Hard to pick which I preferred the most, but probably the FT3.  Handles a bit like an OM1, which I acquired a copy of and rather like - both set their shutter speed the same way with a ring next to the lens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had lots, but I am going to go with an Olympus Trip.  Why?  It belonged to my parents and I borrowed it to go on a school camping safari trip to the Australian outback, and from that trip began two lifelong love affairs - the deserted, harsh, magical outback of Australia and photography. I have never looked back.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an Olympus OM-2n that once belonged to Nikongear.com member papa-g (Geoff Cronje) who sadly passed away in 2008. He gave it to me as a trade for one of my Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 lenses that I had at the time. I remember Geoff was absolutely in love with that Olympus, but when digital hit he got himself a Nikon D50 and then later a D200. 

 

Anyway, the OM-2n sits on a shelf in my lounge with the other remaining cameras in my film collection, the Canon A-1 I mentioned, a FED-2, a Voigtlander Vito B, Fujica V2 and Yashica-A. I think I did run a film through it once, but had some issues with the shutter, so didn't really warm to it. 

 

I think I would love to try some medium format film photography, so getting the Yashica-A fixed up (gummy shutter) might be something worth doing one of these days. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hasselblad 500c

Nikon F2 (Photomic and Meterless)

Olympus OM1


Bill

.... it all gets better as we grow younger and thinner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nikon FE, Nikon F3, both still operational

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Linhof Color II mono-rail

Nikon F3

Nikon F100

 

I used the F100 much more than the F3, but for low light shots with a 50 f/1.2 AiS, the F3 couldn't be beat. Also its modular design made it great for astrophotography on my telescope. 

  The Linhof was used for landscapes and is now in storage awaiting a new darkroom to support it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the day I used a Canon T70. I think I enjoyed it more than the current offerings, despite of its limitations.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

......the RB 6x7 (which, unlike Alan, I use mainly as a hand-held camera hung around my neck!)......

 

Not in a dark church during a wedding you wouldn't! :)

 

The speciality studio I was seconded to do regular weddings for in the early '80's insisted on use of an RB on tripod for the whole wedding as their main profit was selling big prints, and they used to give their photographers real curry if shots were lost through camera movement, something the RB and its ferocious mirror slap seemed to actively encourage. In exchange however they paid really well, and in the end it was my preferred way to do weddings - show up, take the photos, drop the film off at the lab, end of story. No prints, albums, or customers to deal with, and the fee was always paid on receipt of the films.

 

It was their requirements that had me buy into the Mamiya system even before I opened my own business, and the quality of prints that resulted from this rigid prerequisite couldn't be argued with - the studio's reputation was founded on those big, sharp, well-taken photographic prints.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oddly enough I also largely steered clear - until the financial requirements of a divorce settlement threw me head-first into them at a serious level in order to pay those bills - which is rather ironic, come to think of it.

 

Photograph weddings or lose your house - not much of an option there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weddings is something I have resisted from the start, but now I too have little choice but to begin doing them as the corporate market here dries up. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weddings are consistent, although in later years I've definitely seen that you can't get anything that remotely resembles a decent return from them unless you do the full upmarket thing. Too many people with a new DSLR and "photography" printed after their name on a business card willing to do it for pocket money to bolster their "real" job's income.

 

(Something I've always wondered about - why print "photography" rather than "Photographer" after one's name - which is what I've always used.

A surgeon doesn't print "surgery" after his name, nor a dentist "dentistry", nor an accountant "accountancy". I always thought that the use of the word "photography" somehow advertises a lack of confidence in one's own ability, status or qualification. Which is why I used it in any dealings with the Tax Office. :D  )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By visiting this website you are agreeing to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy & Guidelines.