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helioer

The little "earthquake machine"

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My biggest photography project since beginning of October 2014 has been to document rebuild process of the balconies in our building. I as being the chairman of the board of our "building ltd" I have an unlimited "backstage pass" to enter the construction site with my camera (agreement the the site foreman, have to wear a hard hat, protective boots etc). I did have the same agreement four years ago when the water pipes, sewers, main cabling etc was replaced. I've been shooting some 200+ pictures on the site every week.

 

Now all demolishing activity is over. Final stage - balcony roof plate taken away - the previous day when I did my round 11 April. It was done with this little beast:

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The building was built in 1962 and technology those days was a little different than today. the concrete slabs are supported (really) by railroad tracks one meter apart:

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Now we have to support it a little differently but the tracks will remain inside the new balcony slabs cast on-site. Two more pictures of the same structure:

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Being an engineer the whole process has been extremely interesting. Only minor damage so far and work quality has been very good.

 

We are on schedule and we are on budget. I did reserve some additional money to the budget for surprises one expects to find in a project like this. No real big surprises so we'll be able to to do some other nice unrelated things like:

  • re-paint the whole building
  • renovate garage doors
  • renovate main entry doors
  • etc.

Wen I gave a set of cropped pictures from that day to the construction company, they said that these are the best construction site photos they've ever seen. I'll be able to sell a bunch of them to to the company to be used for brochures and advertising.

 

Light that day was excellent and the white covering plastic shield acted as a light tent providing almost shadowless lighting.

 

Gear on the site:

  • D3s
  • 14-24/2.8G, 24-70/2.8G, 85/1.4G, one SB 800 (setting up a multi-flash environment in that messy construction area would be extremely challenging even though YoungNuo wireless triggers would work OK).

I most probably need "deep cleaning" of the gear when the construction work is over in July.

 

The project is expensive, about 1.5 M €. We get 100 k from the government as economic downturn support.

 

As an outcome the re-built balconies will be 60 cm deeper (1.2 m -> 1.8 m). They are already quite long so I'll have about 20 m2 of glazed area with my apartment on the top floor. Additionally we are building a glazed roof terrace because all apartments do not have a balcony but have to pay their share of the project. Issues linked with upgrade (deepening the balconies) will be covered by the apartments having a balcony.

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Well documented indeed - and you have to like the recycling of rail line in that fashion, no matter how primitive of expedient it may have been.

 

I understand what you say about deep-cleaning the equipment later as well - that concrete dust is as fine as talc but a whole lot more abrasive and sticks to everything. Wiping it off a lens dry is almost guaranteed to scratch the coating.

 

With Occupational Health and Safety laws these days I always carry my safety boots, hard hat and safety vest in the car, you never know when access to an area requires them these days.

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I understand what you say about deep-cleaning the equipment later as well - that concrete dust is as fine as talc but a whole lot more abrasive and sticks to everything. Wiping it off a lens dry is almost guaranteed to scratch the coating.

Yep - I've been cleaning the gear with Rocket Blower only due to the abrasive nature of the dust. Ass-gasket on pro lenses has kept the sensor surprisingly clear. And I do have filters on the 24-70 and 85. No such capability on my favorite and a must to have on the site, the 14-24.

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Well documented indeed - and you have to like the recycling of rail line in that fashion, no matter how primitive of expedient it may have been.

 

I understand what you say about deep-cleaning the equipment later as well - that concrete dust is as fine as talc but a whole lot more abrasive and sticks to everything. Wiping it off a lens dry is almost guaranteed to scratch the coating.

 

With Occupational Health and Safety laws these days I always carry my safety boots, hard hat and safety vest in the car, you never know when access to an area requires them these days.

I have to carry three vests around, as I have different projects which all insist on different variations of yellow or orange.

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I have to carry three vests around, as I have different projects which all insist on different variations of yellow or orange.

 

It's seriously becoming comical, these never-ending additions to safety laws. Pretty soon there'll be a requirement for a tag-along nanny in full fluoro kevlar armour to hold our hands in such places.

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Interesting process !

 

I like building and masonry. ( I enlarged my own stoned house),

 

This project you are showing is huge. I hope you'll post more pics, so we can follow the progression of works... :wink:

 

My main tool to clean my lenses is a very, very soft brush that I stole my daughter who l

is beautician (with her agreement, though ! :D )

 

Francis.

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Guys, Guys, you are being far too hard.  :D

 

Just imagine the vast number of overdressed Clip-Board drivers in Australia that you would put out of work if just one universal colour was allowed.  Not to mention the impact on the motor industry as the number of bloody expensive government cars being purchased was lessened!  And the reduced number of ball point pens needed to tick off the boxs on the forms that are attached to their bloody clip boards.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Nice work Helioer/Erkki - I hope that your camera and lenses survive unscathed.

 

The use of old railway track by farmers in Australia and NZ for the construction of farm buildings is not unusual.  The track provides for an economical and strong (but heavy) I-section beam.

 

 

 

 

It's seriously becoming comical, these never-ending additions to safety laws. Pretty soon there'll be a requirement for a tag-along nanny in full fluoro kevlar armour to hold our hands in such places.

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......the concrete slabs are supported (really) by railroad tracks one meter apart......

 

this house was obviously built on the ground of a former railway station :unsure:

 

using a Brokk is a good method to do these kind of jobs

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