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During a visit to 's-Hertogenbosch (or Den Bosch) I had a few minutes to shoot this series of images of the beautiful cathedral. Must return sometime and bring the announced 7-14mm f2.8 with me ...

 

All images Olympus E-M10 and Olympus 12-40mm f2.8. Please view large for best result.

 

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3.

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4.

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5.

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Luc you have put your equipment to good use here, although I suspect one could spend many hours indeed photographing all of the details in this splendid building.  Like many of us, the 7-14mm f2.8 lens can not arrive quickly enough.  That said, the 12-40mm lens is pretty versatile on an OMD body.

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great church, lighting not too good, can you visit another day?


Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

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Looks wonderfully bright and colourful.  My memories of the English cathedrals I have visited are much darker, plainer places.

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Luc you have put your equipment to good use here, although I suspect one could spend many hours indeed photographing all of the details in this splendid building.  Like many of us, the 7-14mm f2.8 lens can not arrive quickly enough.  That said, the 12-40mm lens is pretty versatile on an OMD body.

 

Thanks Hugh. I agree with you, lots of interesting things to see and photograph in these fantastic old buildings!

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great church, lighting not too good, can you visit another day?

 

I actually prefer the slightly clouded weather above sunny as the dynamic range of almost any camera is challenged when very bright light floods in through the windows.

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Looks wonderfully bright and colourful.  My memories of the English cathedrals I have visited are much darker, plainer places.

 

Modern technology allows these kind of images. My wife remarked "the images look better than the real thing ...".

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Those are fantastic, Luc! Absolutely love all of them. Makes me wish there were more cathedrals like that here in the USA.

Your ability to share these visions with us always makes my heart feel good.

Edited by gryphon1911

Nikon D500, D700, Df, 18-140/3.5-5.6 VR, 20/2.8D, 28-105/3.5-4.5D, 50/1.8D, 60/2.8D Macro, 80-200/4.5-5.6, 300/4E PF, 35/2D,  Tamron 70-200/2.8 VC

Manual Focus Lenses:  Nikon 55/3.5 Micro pre-AI, 105/2.5 AI, ZY Mitakon Creator 85/2

Olympus PEN-F, EM5.2, Olympus 9mm f/8 Fisheye, 17/1.8, 75-300/4.8-6.7 II, Panasonic 12-32/3.5-5.6, 12-35/2.8, 35-100/2.8, Sigma 60mm f/2.8 DN Art, ZY Mitakon 25/0.95
 

http://www.bestlightphoto.net | http://www.visualohio.com | http://bestlightphoto.blogspot.com | Flickr | SCEENEINWINDOWS Project

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Thanks Andrew, we are indeed privileged in Europe having so many historic buildings on this continent. I'm once again impressed with the performance of the 12-40mm f2.8 and the in-camera stabilization. All images where shot at iso 200 with shutter speeds as low as 1/10 sec and maximum of 1/50 sec.

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The more I see of the performance of the 12-40, the more I think that I might be able to get away without some of the primes. That is such a great performing lens.

Edited by gryphon1911

Nikon D500, D700, Df, 18-140/3.5-5.6 VR, 20/2.8D, 28-105/3.5-4.5D, 50/1.8D, 60/2.8D Macro, 80-200/4.5-5.6, 300/4E PF, 35/2D,  Tamron 70-200/2.8 VC

Manual Focus Lenses:  Nikon 55/3.5 Micro pre-AI, 105/2.5 AI, ZY Mitakon Creator 85/2

Olympus PEN-F, EM5.2, Olympus 9mm f/8 Fisheye, 17/1.8, 75-300/4.8-6.7 II, Panasonic 12-32/3.5-5.6, 12-35/2.8, 35-100/2.8, Sigma 60mm f/2.8 DN Art, ZY Mitakon 25/0.95
 

http://www.bestlightphoto.net | http://www.visualohio.com | http://bestlightphoto.blogspot.com | Flickr | SCEENEINWINDOWS Project

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Exactly my thoughts. I might sell the Olympus 25mm f1.8, 45mm f1.8 and some Nikkors I don't use that often anymore and buy the Olympus 7-14mm f2.8 and perhaps add the Panasonic 42.5mm f1.2 whose rendering I really crave for. Not sure about the Olympus 40-150mm f2.8 as the bokeh on long distance is not pleasing imo. I might add a Nikkor 70-200mm f4 for the tele range, on the Df of course.

Edited by Luc de Schepper
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Amazing details !

 

an excellent  proof than image stabilization is really useful when using wide angle lenses

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Regards,

Armando

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I like cathedrals a lot. I will point out the first one of the lot, with the lamp close the ceiling becomes "depth". Challenging exposure, I think, you handle it well.

 

  Thanks for sharing it!


Never thought the thread could take this direction

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I actually prefer the slightly clouded weather above sunny as the dynamic range of almost any camera is challenged when very bright light floods in through the windows.

The technical trouble is there. True. But I see in a lot of churches that the Architects put a lot of effort in light design. So a visit on a cloudy day is a least as rewarding as a visit on a sunny day as a visit in Winter Summer and different times of day. You will for sure find new details and perspectives. Concernig technicals the use of tripod if permitted is rewarding ... hdr ... and the use of a Fuji at DR=400 can also be a very good idea

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Regenerate green infrastructure. Let Biodiversity rule!

I blog at: http://klimafarm.com/

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Guest helioer

Excellent captures - love the detail

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The technical trouble is there. True. But I see in a lot of churches that the Architects put a lot of effort in light design. So a visit on a cloudy day is a least as rewarding as a visit on a sunny day as a visit in Winter Summer and different times of day. You will for sure find new details and perspectives. Concernig technicals the use of tripod if permitted is rewarding ... hdr ... and the use of a Fuji at DR=400 can also be a very good idea

 

Frank, I agree different light circumstances would be nice. Unfortunately this cathedral is not in my hometown ... HDR or DR400 are not needed for my use as long as even within the limitations of the relatively small M43 sensor and careful post processing these results are possible. 

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