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Mike G

Technical quality of images!

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Guest frankv

I have noticed that for the last few years the technical quality of posted images is really very high, so with very few exceptions I feel unqualified to criticise that aspect of a photo or image!

 

That leaves the aesthetic qualities to criticise i.e. the framing, composition and such like. Again for me this is an area I also think I'm not very well qualified, I don't think I have the eye! 

 

 

Here we are in the same boat. I don't have any deeper knowledge of art or related subjects, but I often get excited by what I see. When I hear the calling to write/express something about an image I see here, I try to make as much sense as possible. I don't know if it's helpful at all, but I always try to exlpain what I like, instead of just saying "nice image". But writing in english, wich is not my native tounge, can sometimes be challenging.

 

The good folks here at FZ have always treated my humble writings in a good manner, so if anyone feel the need to test their skills at analyzing images, I can't think of a better place.

 

-frank-

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Well said Frank.  :yes:


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

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RE: techiical image quality.

I just saw a big museum show of the work of the very well-known photographer Josef Koudelka

http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/koudelka/;  all mono, all originated on film, with some of the giant prints by inkjet.

Some of his shots, especially the earlier work, are blurry and/or deliberately out of focus.  Some are extremely grainy. The opposite of the current digitally-enabled super-clear(but usually content-deficient) style. 

I thought how nice it would be to have a selection of East German camera lenses from the 1950's and 1960's available.

It was nice.

Edited by pluton
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Keith B.

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Hi Mike G,

I agree, yet one of the reason I come to this site is for honest opinion, this site filled with great knowledgeable folks, whom I would enjoy learning from, at times I wish we had a couple of anonymous buttons, boring, over processed and just bad.

I know when to ignore a comment, and I also know when a comment has a bit of wisdom in it. We can create 100+ post on God and sprirtuality, which I am not certain there are many experts on the topic in this forum. Perhaps we could all accept other honest opinions on a photo or two.

I really want to know if you think a photo is just boring

 

Edited by STS

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Mike you don't have to be an artist to say something meaningful about a photograph.  Look at it and ask yourself, what do you like about it?  Does it stir your emotions?  Or, does it leave you wanting?  This is a community of photographers.  You are part of it.  Mix it up.

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See my photography at http://ronscubadiver.wordpress.com/

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Hi Mike G,

I agree, yet one of the reason I come to this site is for honest opinion, this site filled with great knowledgeable folks, whom I would enjoy learning from, at times I wish we had a couple of anonymous buttons, boring, over processed and just bad.

I know when to ignore a comment, and I also know when a comment has a bit of wisdom in it. We can create 100+ post on God and sprirtuality, which I am not certain there are many experts on the topic in this forum. Perhaps we could all accept other honest opinions on a photo or two.

I really want to know if you think a photo is just boring

 

 

Part of my quest with the Classroom that I opened on Monday is to provide a place of learning where I can teach those who will listen, my honest opinions about gear, photos and whatever else is related to photography in a private and controlled setting. 

 

One of the features of the Classroom is that when you post an image for a project that I have assigned as homework, only you and I will see it. The comments I make on there will come from my heart and won't be sugar-coated. I want to help a student understand both the technical and artistic aspects of making the images they make. If an image fails then they should know why it fails. I think that I am quite qualified to provide input in this manner. 

 

There's also a similar Ask Privately board in the Classroom Zone where students can ask me any questions about photography in private and receive a private answer. If you're looking to get answers on how to price your work, how to pack your gear, whether you should give up your medical practise to become a photographer (don't laugh, this has been asked of me before!), whatever is on your mind that you don't necessarily want a flood of answers from others for, this is a place where it can be done. 

 

Of course everyone is also free to post such questions and also their images in the open boards for the communal opinion too. the Classroom is just a mechanism that I have put in place to help those who are perhaps a little shy when it comes to things like that. 

 

It's $5 a month to gain access to the Classroom, but for the rest of this month it's open to everyone to try out. I will post new lessons each Monday and once a month I will set an assignment that you will need to complete and post in the private Homework board. 

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Please don't get me wrong chaps I'm not anti criticism, in fact all for it as it usually provokes discussion, great. When I grow old maybe I'll develop an eye.  :D

 

Obviously I didn't get my idea across, it just struck me that nowadays there are very few technically duff pictures here, even B/W.  :yes:

 

I occurred to me that it has become much more that the criticism is about the non technicalities but how it looks, so it comes down to ones perception of what you are looking at, and I love looking but get pangs of conscience when telling someone I think they've got it wrong, after all who am I?

 

Having read the comments with interest I've decided not to worry so much! 

 

Dallas nice sales pitch.  :D


Mike Gorman

 

Lumix G9 , GX8 - Leica 12, 15, 20, 25, 42.5 - 8-18, 12-60, 35-100, 45-175

 

 

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I got what you were saying, and could find nothing to comment on as it was perfectly sensible.

 

The only extension to that is that it isn't really necessary to give a critique in either aspect - technical or "artistic", but many times I simply find myself commenting that I like an image and maybe even why, without feeling any need to dissect it wine-judge style. If I don't like something, well there's no point in saying anything (or even thinking of saying anything, for that matter), just as often when I like something it doesn't necessarily bear comment, either.

 

I can see that this approach may not be the most helpful one to others, but then again I rather prefer simply enjoying the photos that people post, rather than getting all judgementally critical about things. Similarly I tend to post photos that I think others may get a kick out of, rather than choose these as if I was trying to win a competition or prize. I don't necessarily post photos that are "good", but rather those which may spark interest in ways other than the nuts and bolts of the how and the technicals of taking them.

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I suspect this is a topic that can run and run. With modern cameras the technical quality is easier to achieve than it has ever been before, but that doesn't make all pictures great. So I get what Mike is saying in that there is often (but not always) not much to say about technicalities. 

I am firmly with Ron - for me the purpose of any photo is to produce some kind of emotional impact. Now that is endless, nuanced, and deeply enjoyable to converse over. 

Game on!


"The changing of bodies into light, and light into bodies, is very conformable to the course of Nature, which seems delighted with transmutations." - Sir Isaac Newton

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I suspect this is a topic that can run and run. With modern cameras the technical quality is easier to achieve than it has ever been before, but that doesn't make all pictures great. So I get what Mike is saying in that there is often (but not always) not much to say about technicalities. 

I am firmly with Ron - for me the purpose of any photo is to produce some kind of emotional impact. Now that is endless, nuanced, and deeply enjoyable to converse over. 

Game on!

 

Ironically, superb technique may induce emotional impact!  Like, awe, envy, avarice - got to have that lens! :D


Eb Mueller

British Columbia, Canada

http://www.pbase.com/emueller

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Then there is also the factor of combination.

 

A photograph may be superb, generating awe, envy, avarice when displaying either strong visual or emotional excitement or simply superb technique.

 

Then there are the rarer few that combine both which then further generate feelings of despair and inadequacy in onlookers through their perfect brilliance. That goal is so often chased but so rarely achieved as to render the outcome ones that true respect and fame results from.

 

These are the photographs that separate these gifted practitioners from the otherwise "successful" photographers whose combined photographic adequacy and gifted marketing skills result in the monetary wealth by which their success is quantified.

 

The ultimate and almost never achieved is a combination of all when practised to perfection.

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Then there is also the factor of combination.

 

...

The ultimate and almost never achieved is a combination of all when practised to perfection.

Superb technique, inspired subject matter / composition, crafty marketing!  When combining all three, I applaud and don't begrudge anyone's success and wealth that might result.  However, success based on the latter, crafty marketing, instills a very emotional WTF moment in this viewer.  Of course, my emotional response means very little in the scheme of things.  It is the emotional response of the pecunious which counts!

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Eb Mueller

British Columbia, Canada

http://www.pbase.com/emueller

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Exactly, Eb.

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