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wildoat

Three tractors, one lady driver and two motorcycles......

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I like colour photography probably as much as anyone but at

some of these types of events there can be lots of distracting colours

in the background, black and white can help to isolate or emphasize

your subject plus I genuinely think it can give the images a more timeless quality.

 

I'm not a tractor fanatic but I couldn't help but think of the importance

of these old machines in all of our history, basically they kept us fed

when times were much different.

 

The lady driver obviously stood out as all the other drivers were fellas, I'd

like to have known her story and how she came to be driving this lovely old

machine which I think originated from the US.

 

There is not much movement shown here as panning vehicles travelling at a moderate

walking pace is futile in my experience, lol.

 

Please view large.

 

original.jpg

 

 

 

A happy chap

 

original.jpg

 

The condition of this machine was literally as new, at least on the outside!

 

original.jpg

 

Haven't seen one of these before...original.jpg

 

 

I owned one of these over thirty years ago so to see one in mint condition was 

pretty nostalgic.

 

original.jpg

 

thanks for looking.

 

Tony

Edited by wildoat
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Tony I here what you say about trying to be nostalgic, but I think that reasoning falls down because the quality of the photos is too good and to my eyes loses any type of "old" look.  :D

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Nice collection of machinery.  The ride on that first bike must be brutal.

 

Not as bad as it looks, I suspect. High profile tyres compared to modern bikes, sprung forks and a sprung saddle. I'm not saying it will be like a Rolls Royce, but it will be some way better than brutal. Unsprung rears wheels on motorcycles went on for decades before rear suspension became the norm.

 

Nice photos, Tony. I like the lower angle on the motorcycles. I think B&W works well on a purely technical level, not sure I buy the whimsy argument though...

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I love the minimalistic design of the frist tractor.  Old machines are indeed rich in various characters which are enhanced by your B&W rendition very nicely.

 

Thanks for sharing, Tony!

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Nice collection of machinery.  The ride on that first bike must be brutal.

 

Thanks for looking and commenting Ron. 

Tony I here what you say about trying to be nostalgic, but I think that reasoning falls down because the quality of the photos is too good and to my eyes loses any type of "old" look.  :D

Thanks Mike, actually I was being lazy, getting pretty fed up with having to

remove dayglo jackets which seem to keep popping up in my photos  :D

 

Not as bad as it looks, I suspect. High profile tyres compared to modern bikes, sprung forks and a sprung saddle. I'm not saying it will be like a Rolls Royce, but it will be some way better than brutal. Unsprung rears wheels on motorcycles went on for decades before rear suspension became the norm.

 

Nice photos, Tony. I like the lower angle on the motorcycles. I think B&W works well on a purely technical level, not sure I buy the whimsy argument though...

 

Thanks for your comments Damian.

Obviously none of these tractors have suspension, handling is perhaps not

paramount, I suppose their tyres provide a reasonable ride quality on less than hard ground! lol.

 

I must be getting old, ultra low profile tyres for a daily driver car in the UK are

a major pain in the ass literally.

My new golf has sumptuous 55 profile tyres, yet it still has good body control, excellent ride

comfort and overall predictable and fairly enjoyable handling.

My previous car had 40 series tyres, they were dangerous, hit a bump mid bend in the wet 

on the road and the car would literally bounce sideways as it lost grip, not a pleasant

experience.

 

Hope your move to the US went smoothly, wish you and your family all the best

on your new adventure.

 

Tony

I love the minimalistic design of the frist tractor.  Old machines are indeed rich in various characters which are enhanced by your B&W rendition very nicely.

 

Thanks for sharing, Tony!

Thanks Akira,

 

I too liked the simple design of the "Farmall" unit.

 

Tony

Edited by wildoat

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Guest Thomas_MUA

The lady pilot is absolutely fabulous! f/4 works well to isolate...

Possible suggestions to farther isolate? 

1. Shoot wide from prone to frame against sky (back in the day we used red or yellow filters to pop the clouds) however in PS it's ridiculously easy now...

2. Bring a step ladder to the event... I assist two commercial shooters who ALWAYS have a 12 foot stepladder (which I have to carry... lol) in order to isolate for a client's needs...  It's amazing what a wide angle from 15 feet up can do... however don't try this without an assistant holding the ladder...

3. Long glass wide open... 200mm or better at f2.8 is an industry standard...

 

but as is all are superb...

 

Love the bikes... remembering the Vincent Black Shadow and Black Lightning... the rockets of my era... this British bike (Black Lightning) set the US national motorcycle speed record of 150mph in 1948 with a prone rider in swimwear... lol

 

Thanks sooooo much for sharing... yep the monochromatic rendering effect can be magical... bravo!

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Nice collection Tony. These shows are always interesting for the bunch of characters you find there and I think old machinery like this has its own natural charm.

Out of interest, can you tell us where it took place?

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Thank you Thomas for your comments

they are helpful and I'll certainly consider them next time I shoot 

this type of thing.

 

You are so right about long glass wide open, I miss my 200f2, am seriously considering getting another.

The only problem with longer glass for this type of event is ensuring folks don't get between

me and the subject, but as you suggest it can be achieved with a little

planning and thought.

I have never used a stepladder in the manner you describe but when I was at a Rolls Royce gathering

just a few weeks back the official photographer was using one to get full portrait shots of the cars looking down 

onto the bonnet/hood region of the cars, at least that way the only other element in the image is lawn, which 

is not distracting really.

 

Tony

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Nice collection Tony. These shows are always interesting for the bunch of characters you find there and I think old machinery like this has its own natural charm.

Out of interest, can you tell us where it took place?

Thanks Colin.

The photos were taken at the Cirencester steam fair, the weekend just passed.

There is an even bigger steam fair held in Dorset towards the end of this month,

apparently it's recognised as being the largest event of it's type in the World!

I may even try to get along to this one too.

 

See the included link.

 

http://www.visit-dorset.com/whats-on/the-great-dorset-steam-fair-p468653

Edited by wildoat

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Guest Thomas_MUA

Tony;

 

I hear your about missing your 200mm,,,  and yes the working distance can be a challenge however after a while you get calibrated eyes and envision where to position yourself for a clear shot...

 

As for stepladders? Might add that here across the pond the moment any free standing equipment touches the ground permits need to be pulled for shooting in public and/or private space... It's strange that a tourist can setup a tripod no problem but the instant I setup a light stand security is all over me for permits... Typically involves provided proof of professional liability insurance and a permit fee... 

 

If you are planing on shooting an event touching base with the those in responsibly charge can go a long way toward gaining preferred access... Having a commercial web site and business card are appropriate and germane here...  Another option is to query who the "official" tog for the event is and solicit them if you can assist pro-bono... works for me :)

 

Once you're a known player in the event circuit then everything changes and you'll likely receive a "Media" pass at the very least...

 

Looking forward to more of your excellent photojournalist imagery...

 

All the best on your journey... 

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There is an even bigger steam fair held in Dorset towards the end of this month,

apparently it's recognised as being the largest event of it's type in the World!

 

Definitely sounds worth checking out.

 

You may also be interested in one slightly further west just a few days earlier - we went there a few years back (my other half's family have worked on farms for a few years and know some of this kit from first hand experience)

http://www.honitonhillrally.co.uk/

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Hi Wildoat,

 

Your third photo is of a type of tractor called a Field Marshall. If you look them up on Wikipedia I think you will find the starting system, and the reason for the large flywheel, interesting.  :D 

Edited by Mebyon K

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