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Fujinon XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 R LM OIS

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If you have used this lens, let others know what you thought of it by rating (and/or) reviewing it in this thread.

We will keep the thread as relevant as we can, so expect off-topic entries to be removed.

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I've only had the Fuji XF 55-200 for a few days.  In that short time however I've concluded that for me it's a keeper.  For comparison in the mirrorless world, I've also owned the Sony 55-210 E mount, and used it on both NEX-5N and NEX-7 bodies.  In a nutshell, in my opinion the Fuji is the better lens, and by a good margin at that.  Here are points of comparison:

 

Fuji 55-200 pros:

Much better optically than the Sony E mount 55-210.  Not that the Sony is an awful lens, however it suffers from more CA and other issues, more distortion, and noticeably less contrast than the Fuji.  The Fuji is an excellent performer even wide open, which is more than can be said of the Sony.

The Fuji build quality is really in a different league than the Sony.  By comparison, the Sony feels decidedly less expensive.  Which makes sense as the Fuji is about twice the cost of the Sony in the U.S.

The Fuji focuses faster and more accurately than the Sony did on either of my NEX bodies.  Really, for all the griping about Fuji's AF, even the NEX-7 did not focus as well with their 55-210.  I have not tried a NEX-6, so cannot speak to that one.

The Fuji 55-200 is slightly faster than the Sony 55-210 (f/3.5 vs f/4.5 on the 55mm end).

 

Sony E 55-210 pros:

The Sony lens is less expensive than the Fuji XF 55-200.  However, at $700 in the U.S., I really don't think the Fuji lens is priced out of line, especially given the quality of the product.

The Sony lens is also less weight than the Fuji lens, and is smaller diameter also.  Again, the Fuji is both faster and better quality than the Sony, so I suppose that's the trade-off.

 

A few samples - no award winners, but I had fun.  Hope some of you may find these helpful.  :P

 

At 55mm


i-GX8znMr-X2.jpg

 

At 200mm

i-hJt5x2B-X3.jpg

 

At 181mm, in a tent during a concert.  I had trouble getting a clear shot of that hair - too many people!

i-nPtRLDZ-X3.jpg

 

At 200mm, slightly cropped

i-Hs5LzBN-X2.jpg

 

At 148.5mm

i-X5HNzGP-X2.jpg

 

Not well executed, but shows at 200mm you can get nice OOF areas

i-PVCPjBT-X2.jpg

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Only just received mine, but even after a few familiarization shots I can tell that I'm going to love using this lens. Bigger than it looks in photographs, but not so big as to be cumbersome, it is about the same weight as my venerable 200/4 AI-s Nikkor prime, and about an inch longer at full 200mm extension than is the AI-s lens when focused at infinity. They've also endowed it with a good long round lens shade which offers a world of protection, fits very snugly and really does the job of keeping the sun out unless almost pointing directly at it.

 

Comparing it to my last Nikkor zooms, I reckon the thing is an absolute bargain for the quality of the build. As mnscott has already shown above, the OOF background bokeh is really rendered well, with no apparent double imaging that I've yet noticed and which seems to be common in so many longer OIS/VR lenses.

 

$700-odd spent very well, as far as I'm concerned - although this didn't cost me anything in cash, for both it and the 18-55 came courtesy of cleaning out my lens shelf of old AF-D Nikkors and other bits and pieces that I hadn't used for years :) .

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Great samples. I am now officially jealous.  :)


There is nothing worse than a brilliant image of a fuzzy concept. - Ansel Adams

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Unlike a new Nikkor zoom it appears that despite the whining about Fuji's slow AF focus that Fuji at least makes cameras and lenses which don't need calibrating or menu adjustments to get their lenses focusing exactly where the focus bracket is placed. My little spin yesterday afternoon to have my arse frozen off on the bleak copse that is the Red Hill Cemetery at Bushy Park proved that the AF hits the mark at any focal length or distance I chose, just as it did with the 18-55 and with both the 35mm and 14mm primes. There was some hunting when I tried to focusa on distant mountains under heavy overcast (very flat contrast), but a quick flick of the MF lever on the camera with my left index finger while pressing the command wheel with my right thumb for 10X viewfinder magnification and turning the wonderfully smooth and well damped focus ring with left hand again soon had precise focus attained.

 

Sharpness is excellent, perhaps only slightly soft at the long end on a distant shot (but that could also be movement even with OIS engaged - one really notices hand-held wobble out at 200mm with this lightweight setup), so I'll investigate this next time out, but in all other cases the OIS worked flawlessly to get sharp shots.

 

So, just for reference (light as flat as a tack, so very low contrast.... these were all shot at 200mm, hand held, OIS on, ISO 800 and processed in LightZone 4.0)

 

AF is bang on (1/350 f/5.6):

1-372-F56_zpsd5baf457.jpg

 

Pulling in detail over 1km away:

(whole frame) 1/480, f/5.6

_DSF7313_lzn1km_zps2babc664.jpg

 

(100% of above, click on "Save" for proper render, thumbnail has messed with sharpness):

Dist100_zpsed4c5d58.jpg

 

Closeup - AF spot-on again, bokeh (!) 1/140, f/8

_DSF7307_lznOkeyBokehF8_zpsf9ea9e9c.jpg

 

Only further comment about Bokeh - it's rougher in foreground OOF areas compared with the smooth background in the preferable tradeoff in design, and the shot of the graves in the BG isn't rough bokeh but the writing doubling up on being thrown out of focus.

 

It's not a prime lens in performance by any means, but it isn't overly hampered by the slow f/4.8 long end as the OIS works extremely well and doesn't seem to have any deleterious effect on background bokeh. Being winter here the birds have all headed north, but hopefully this lens will get me some nice shots of my resident Superb Blue Fairy Wrens when they get back from vacation.

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Impressive stuff. Looks like I'll have to start saving again!


Andrew

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I'm already juggling finances for the 10-24 when it comes out, given the quality/price ratio of the two zoom lenses so far when compared to the money I was used to paying for Nikon zooms.

 

Also a 23/1.4. 56/1.4 and a second body when the X-Pros appears and I'm done. Thinking about getting my almost disused X-100 converted to IR as well.

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I took a few shots with the 55-200 yesterday at a local annual car show.  I'm very pleased with the results.  Not only is it very sharp, but I found hand holding quite comfortable.  It balances nicely, which makes for a very stable shooting platform.  Reminds my of my much loved Nikkor 300 f/4 AF-S on a FF dslr in that respect.  Nowhere near as bulky, though.  :)

 

The 55-200 proved to be very useful for candids.  Here are a few, starting with the proud owners of a very colorful vintage truck:

 

i-vcZSMKF-X2.jpg

 

The first aid crew was wandering the grounds.

 

i-JWGrjSw-X2.jpg

 

A whole family of sunburn victims sat down beside my son and me.

i-HvPdbsp-X2.jpg

 

This kid was really getting into racing some model cars:


i-pDPPszN-X2.jpg

 

This young man seemed unable to believe what he was hearing.  Shot into late day sun - very strong back lighting!

i-sqmXhmp-X2.jpg

 

Another in the same late day sun.  This one is slightly cropped:

i-kTW9g5N-X2.jpg

 

After a double-take or two, I realized the little "kid" is a prop.  The woman on the left was real, though.

i-w7K8f5k-X2.jpg

 

 

This one is plenty sharp, and shot at a shutter speed that probably shouldn't have worked well (1/105 sec at 148.5mm).

i-CFWLSKC-X2.jpg

Edited by mnscott

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 - HEADS UP -  well that was short and sweet, the front lens block (the bit that extends when zooming) came loose yesterday. The lens is toast - keeps on asking to switch the camera off and on again (pity that was one of the standard funny lines from the TV show "The IT Crowd - this isn't bloody funny at all!).

 

First I noticed was that the lens had fully extended on its own after having been carried in its usual backward-facing position at my right hip when attached to the camera. When I tried to zoom it back to 55mm it jammed at about 2/3 retracted. Instinctively I checked the front tube for tightness and it was flopping laterally very easily, like one of the helicoid pins had fallen out or broken.

 

I say emphatically that the lens was NOT bumped or dropped in any way - the position it is carried in when on camera makes that impossible unless I'm walking backwards or the strap disconnects at both ends at the same time, neither of which happened, and most times it has been carried off-camera in a very secure LowePro technical vest pouch anyway.


I can do without this totally unexpected thing happening - I'm now forced to use manual focus Nikon AI-s lenses at an event tomorrow which will have many people moving in a crowd situation, plus after many years of dealing with Nikon I am also apprehensive that I'm in for the same sort of accusations of rough handling that Nikon are famous for throwing at people with failed equipment. I hope Fuji are more accommodating, at least their form so far has been more customer orientated.

 

Until I get confirmation of the reason for failure, take kid-gloves care of your 55-200 - it might not be constructed quite as well as it appears.

Edited by Alan

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That is truly sad news. I hope that you get a quick repair or replacement. Also, I hope that this is an isolated occurence or that will be even sadder. That worries me a bit as this was going to be my next lens. Maybe I'll get the 14mm lens instead and wait for manufacturing to get things smoothed out.


There is nothing worse than a brilliant image of a fuzzy concept. - Ansel Adams

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Sad indeed - completely rattled my faith in Fuji that this could happen. Seriously debating with myself at the moment if I can really put all my eggs in the Fuji basket, I can't afford to have unreliable gear. Unfortunately the D3s is gone now, but I think my 24-120 hasn't sold yet so maybe a panic-driven purchase of a D7100 & 10-24 lens along with the return of my 24-120 will at least give me an AF-capable alternative in cases like this.

 

I was kinda hoping that an X-Pros would be the next body, I never contemplated a lens failure such as this which has never happened to me before (physical damage, yes, but I have insurance for that and if I drop a lens it's my own stupid fault). I've always stressed more over having backup bodies....

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Alan, the failure of this new Fuji zoom lens does not surprise me.

 

I am rough on lens (climbing, hiking, camping, etc.).  Over 40 years, the only lenses I've had malfunction were zoom lenses.  I've never had any type of failure of a prime lens.

 

I have not owned a zoom lens for years. 

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I've owned both zooms and primes for years in several different format sizes, the only failures were both zooms and caused by that dead stupid Manfrotto hex-plate failing to properly seat in the hex socket of the tripod head, with the camera falling and hitting the ground (once) and carpet (once) as a result, both times dislodging the innards. This lens was not bumped, hit, dropped or in any way abused other than extremely gentle normal handling (when I say gentle, I refer to the actual conditions - hand-held, good weather, no moisture, outdoors with no hard surfaces to bump into) so it couldn't even have been an unnoticed bump.

 

I'm really hoping that this was just a one-off slip-up with whoever was screwing the thing together at the factory, but with only a couple of hundred shots under its belt this has not reassured me that the next one won't also fail. Like I say, I hate unreliable equipment, even worse I hate worrying about the possibility of failure. In this case I just thought I'd have a final run through of the lens before tomorrows job, and just as well I did - I would not have had my Nikkor primes with me as I will now be sure to take tomorrow. Manual focus on single focal length lenses for the candid long shots of moving people will really add workload, though.

 

When I do my forest photography (as is my major pursuit) I only ever take primes with me anyhow - I got the Fuji zooms specifically for the sort of people/events photography I have to do tomorrow, and it really pisses me off that I never even got to use the lens once for work - all the shots taken so far were simply familiarization exercises to get used to the lens' behaviour.

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I've never had a lens failure before, knock on wood. Our circumstances may vary however. Alan, while this hopefully is an isolated instance, it should really never happen.


There is nothing worse than a brilliant image of a fuzzy concept. - Ansel Adams

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At least I'll have my equipment dealer on side due to the sheer volume of stuff I've bought from him over the years. I'll definitely be cashing in on the loyalty points in getting this sorted ASAP.

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Several reports now starting to appear on Fuji X forums about exactly the same problem that I experienced. I'll put it down to one worker in the assembly line not tightening something up correctly whilst others did. Luck of the draw if you've got a dodgy one, but no problem with Fuji replacing the lens reported elsewhere either. I guess the intermittent likelihood of getting one from the incorrectly fastened lot don't warrant a full recall, but Fuji's voluntary replacement without question is to be lauded in light of the response likely from other manufacturers who seem to magically produce a mark or two indicating "rough usage" rather than just 'fessing up to faulty manufacture.


The replacement they sent me felt totally different in zooming - the ring was both tighter and smoother in function than the initial lens, something that has also been reported by others with the same lens problem after their replacement arrived.

 

Top marks to Fuji for excellent customer service.

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Thanks for the heads-up Alan,

 

I'll check the zoom action before buying one later this year. Very useful hint.

Glad your tele is working as it should now.


Regards, Daniel

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Finally managed to take the replacement lens into town today and shoot a few frames to make sure everything is OK, and will therefore confirm that my previous observations about the somewhat extraordinary OIS implementation was no aberration - it really is extraordinary.

 

Holding the camera vertically ( I have no extra grip fitted, so this is the least steady way to hold the camera), every frame I shot was not only bang on the focus point using the AF, but even at the full 200mm extension shooting at 1/140sec @f/6.4 @ISO 800, every frame was sharp with no shake. I always thought "meh" about Nikon's VR - all the lenses I had with that never convinced me that it was much help at all - has just been confirmed as a correct "meh" by the way Fuji's OIS keeps things steady.

 

I thought this sign to a market offered some interesting options so I took it as described above (click for size):

 

_DSF8782_lzn_zps7780260d.jpg

 

Not an exciting shot, even if slightly humorous, but note there's a little penny farthing on the top of the Mart sign, and for those who would pixel peek at a 100% section of the LightZone processed file...
100-pocent_zps38df0d79.jpg

 

For a pro-am zoom lens that cost only $895, hand held at 300mm FX equiv AOV, not only is the accuracy in AF focus point incredible, but that OIS is just amazing. It does, however, seem to mess a bit with the beautiful bokeh of un-OISed shots I've taken.

 

 

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The 55-200mm is indeed a sharp keeper - congratulations Alan.

I'm really tempted to try it on an airshow in October if I can find one. They're not readily available in Switzerland yet.

Regards, Daniel

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Every time I use mine I am once again amazed at what a good job it does. Fortunately, it is still holding together mechanically. That's more than can be said for the transmission in my motorcycle.


There is nothing worse than a brilliant image of a fuzzy concept. - Ansel Adams

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Alan, glad to hear you finally have your 55-200 troubles sorted out.  It is indeed a wonderful lens, especially for the price.  I find I use mine quite a lot.

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Guest Lars Hansen

With the reviews in this thread and the shots I've seen elsewhere here on FZ this lens has been on my wish list for a while. Two months ago when the prices dropped I finally bought one.

 

I can confirm the great IQ described here but what surprises me the most is the effectiveness of the OIS. I also have the Fujinon 18-55 with OIS and I know the value of the OIS but being able to shoot handheld (with a little support) at long focal lengths at around 1/30s and get keepers is a very nice surprise.

 

Unfortunately I haven't had a chance to use the lens much yet because I've had issues with what I believe to be a centering defect - Fuji is currently looking into the issue and as usual they've provided great support.

 

A few samples from a local church i dim light.

 

The short end - @55mm, f5.6 and 1/13s

 

In the following shots at longer focal lengths I was sitting at a chair to get a bit of extra support.

 

At the longer end - @155mm, f5.6 and 1/25s

 

And a little longer - @173mm, f5.6 and 1/20s

 

Almost at the longest end - @190mm, f5.6 and 1/30

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With the new 50-140/2.8 now released, I did give thought to swapping and taking a loss both at the longer end and financially, but quickly came to the conclusion that the 55-200 is so good despite its slower speed that I simply could not justify losing the extra 60mm in exchange for WR and a constant f/2.8, and keep my money at the same time.

 

I'll also go so far as to say that the 55-200 has a rather distinct visual character to its images - I would likely have guessed that these shots were taken with it even without them having been identified as such.\

 

Plus, as noted, the OIS is simply superb in this lens, and makes a complete nonsense of the old "twice the shutter speed of the focal length" rule to avoid camera shake during exposure.

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I think this is a very good lens.

 

post-4328-0-14221600-1425855315_thumb.jp

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      Using a fill-in flash can be one of the most rewarding thing to do with interior photography with subject that are backlighted during the daylight period. The color temperature is similar between the ambiant natural light and the electronic flash output and the only big task is to choose an interesting exposure balance between the two in preserving or not the shadows or even simply voluntarily underexposure the ambiant (effect often use in fashion photography).
       

      Using the Fujifilm F-X8 as a fill-in flash
       
      Small in-board camera flashes are a very handy solution but they are located usually too near the taking lens  and often interfering with the lens hood that you have to remove to prevent incomplete flash coverage. The Fujifilm EF-X8 give a more elevated flash reflector position. You just have to push it in its down position if you want to shut its power off.
       
      Officially the Fujifilm X-E3 is a less "sporty" camera model than let's say the X-T series models such as the X-T20 or the X-T2 or even the X-H1. The off-center viewfinder may create a small different perspective between you naked eye and the image recorded by the taking lens but if your concentrate your attention to your viewfinder it wont be noticeable. So spontaneous photography stay a strong opportunity.
       

       
      As for most of the Fujifilm X-series camera models, the controls of the photo basic parameters are designed in a similar fashion way as it is used to be for the traditional analog (film) cameras. Shutter speed, lens aperture, exposure correction and focusing options including manual adjustment can be selected with direct dials or control rings. The others parameters have to be adjusted through push buttons, touch screen options or using the versatile joystick located beside the rear screen. All these functionality controls need to be learn before really be able to master them without hesitation.
       
      Using the Quick menu (Q) and reprogramming certains function controls can facilitate the handling of the Fujifilm X-E3. Most of the menu option presentations are easy to understand and interact but some functionalities may need more time and essaies to get the habit. There is a lot of autofocusing modes at your disposal that can tailored your shooting workflow. The all-"AUTO" option (lever next to the shutter speed dial) is a good idea for emergency snapshot without disturbing your already programed setting.
       

       
      The electronic viewfinder (EVF) is fine detailed with all the (configurable) information you need and got an auto-rotation presentation very useful for vertical framing. In some specific situations the image on the EVF will be more contrasting making more difficult to evaluate low and highlights. For people who are wearing glasses like me the eye relief is more limit and will ask you to pay more attention to the corner of your framing composition of your subject. The back and none-orientable live screen (LVF) give you a better reviewing rendition of your picture facilitating a deeper image analysis.
       
      The side location of the Fujifilm X-E3 electronic viewfinder may give you a better viewing confort compare to the centered viewfinders of the X-T series models. The  instant picture review is easier and the reviewing (Play) push button is located on the bottom right side of the LVF.
       
      In all the Fujifilm X-E3 is a very convenient camera model that respond correctly to the compact size device but without sacrificing too much better handling compare to the larger DSLR model type.
       
      If you are already an owner of other Fujifilm X-series models you will fully enjoy that the X-E3 is using the same battery packs and external electronic flashes without forgetting that it is part of the same optical lens mount system.
       
       

       
      The Fujifilm X-E3 doesn't have an in-(camera)body-image-stabilization system (IBIS) and will rely on your ability to set and handle the camera to avoid generating blurry from the photographer's movement. Of course you can couple a lens with an optical image stabilization (OIS) that will help you to prevent that phenomena and further permit you to select lower shutter speed in low light situations or simply to get a smaller lens aperture (for increasing the deep of field). As a loosely rule of thumb, no stabilization is available with focal fix lenses (except for the new XF80mm F2.8 OIS Macro and the XF200mm F2 OIS) and it is the contrary with zoom lenses (with some noticeable exceptions such as the XF16-55mm F2.8 Pro). At this day the Fujifilm X-H1 is the only X-Series model equipped with an IBIS.
       
      What I am appreciated the most of the Fujifilm X-E3 is its compactness and its very discrete status in regard of other people ressent when they are facing the camera. It is what can call not only a user-friendly camera but also a subject-friendly photo device. Combined with a short fixe focal or short zoom lens, the X-E3 appears to be part of the family. It is not perceive as an agressive intruder of our life compare to the look with the DSLRs. So the interaction between the photographer and the subject is very different and much more positive.
       

       
      If you like Black & White photography you will adore to work with the Fujifilm X-E3. This lovely camera model offers you a choice of two monochrome reddition, standard Monochrome and Acros, with 3 different filtering variations, Yellow, Red or Green. So you can literally transform the X-E3 as a Monochrome camera without further expensive investment. (This remark is also good for the other Fujifilm models).
       
      Is it sufficient to simply have a good camera device that can deliver not only nice, well exposed and focused pictures but which is also a creative tool fun to use and to bring with you? Sure there will always be more performing camera models now and in the future and that is inevitable in this race for better human crafting. But in the mean time we have not to forget that the most interesting and rewarding think is to do photography.
       
      In a sense the Fujifilm X-E3 fulfill nicely the task of proximity photography essential in close urban situations or in interior contexts. The Fujifilm X-E3 is a compact photo companion that is not only a competent tool but is also an inspired creative device.
       
    • By danielm
      I've got a long love affair with the original rangefinder cameras (Leica M4-P & M6) and the now digital rangefinder style cameras (Fujifilm X-E2, X-E2S & X-E3). I don't know if it is due of the fact that their viewfinder is located off center (meaning not in the same optical axe of the picture taking lens). But that peculiar camera body design seems to stimulate my creativity and my motivation to brought the camera in places and at moments that I will have a tendency to ignore.
       
      The Fujifilm X-E3 is the fourth version of a popular model design that many photographers like to bring with them as their main camera or at least as their back up camera body that happens to becoming eventually their most used. The X-E3 is using the same 24MP image sensor that the X-T2 and the X-T20 have. So the picture quality is at par of the two last mentioned models.
       
      One of the thing which most interesting when you are using a rangefinder style digital camera is the fact that they are less noticeable, less protuberant, less intrusive in front of the subject.. This characteristic to be more discrete is always appreciated by the spontaneous photographer on the street, during a travel and even when you taking a candid portrait of a person (The camera seems to be less "serious").
       
      Many people were tempted to make the comparaison with the Fujifilm X100F which a compact APS-C digital camera doted with a similar fixed lens of 23mm. If you combine the Xf23mm F2.0 lens with the Fujifilm X-E3 the two cameras will give the same angle of view. But the Fujifilm X100F is more a (large) pocket camera while the Fujifilm X-E3 is an interchangeable lens model that have a more standard dimension.
       

      Fujifilm X-E3 w/ Fujinon XF55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS
       
      Most people will talk in length about the good or the bad handling of a camera model. It is always a very personal and intuitive impression at the end. Ergonomics are designed by technicians that are biased by their own physical and cultural differences. All this has been said one thing that I have experimented with the Fujifilm X-E3 is its fine ergonomic in terms of the camera body and lens combination and I am surprise how good and easy it is still true even when you are using a larger zoom lens such as the Fujinon XF55-200 F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS. As a travel or street photographer I fully appreciate this ability.
       

       
      About the tiny Fujifilm EF-X8 electronic flash which is included with the furnished camera accessories I was skeptical of its practical use but I have found it very easy to bring with me and positioning on the X-E3 (You can leave it at rest on the Fujifilm X-E3 camera at its down off-position). Dont forget that the EF-X8 is using the battery pack power of your camera. As a fill-flash and as an emergency flash unit are may be the two best tasks of the EF-X8. For a more extended use of an electronic flash it is better to couple an external unit doted with its own power management.
       

      Window back lightning interior ambiant light exposed
       
      Using a fill-in flash can be one of the most rewarding thing to do with interior photography with subject that are backlighted during the daylight period. The color temperature is similar between the ambiant natural light and the electronic flash output and the only big task is to choose an interesting exposure balance between the two in preserving or not the shadows or even simply voluntarily underexposure the ambiant (effect often use in fashion photography).
       

      Using the Fujifilm F-X8 as a fill-in flash
       
      Small in-board camera flashes are a very handy solution but they are located usually too near the taking lens  and often interfering with the lens hood that you have to remove to prevent incomplete flash coverage. The Fujifilm EF-X8 give a more elevated flash reflector position. You just have to push it in its down position if you want to shut its power off.
       
      Officially the Fujifilm X-E3 is a less "sporty" camera model than let's say the X-T series models such as the X-T20 or the X-T2 or even the X-H1. The off-center viewfinder may create a small different perspective between you naked eye and the image recorded by the taking lens but if your concentrate your attention to your viewfinder it wont be noticeable. So spontaneous photography stay a strong opportunity.
       

       
      As for most of the Fujifilm X-series camera models, the controls of the photo basic parameters are designed in a similar fashion way as it is used to be for the traditional analog (film) cameras. Shutter speed, lens aperture, exposure correction and focusing options including manual adjustment can be selected with direct dials or control rings. The others parameters have to be adjusted through push buttons, touch screen options or using the versatile joystick located beside the rear screen. All these functionality controls need to be learn before really be able to master them without hesitation.
       
      Using the Quick menu (Q) and reprogramming certains function controls can facilitate the handling of the Fujifilm X-E3. Most of the menu option presentations are easy to understand and interact but some functionalities may need more time and essaies to get the habit. There is a lot of autofocusing modes at your disposal that can tailored your shooting workflow. The all-"AUTO" option (lever next to the shutter speed dial) is a good idea for emergency snapshot without disturbing your already programed setting.
       

       
      The electronic viewfinder (EVF) is fine detailed with all the (configurable) information you need and got an auto-rotation presentation very useful for vertical framing. In some specific situations the image on the EVF will be more contrasting making more difficult to evaluate low and highlights. For people who are wearing glasses like me the eye relief is more limit and will ask you to pay more attention to the corner of your framing composition of your subject. The back and none-orientable live screen (LVF) give you a better reviewing rendition of your picture facilitating a deeper image analysis.
       
      The side location of the Fujifilm X-E3 electronic viewfinder may give you a better viewing confort compare to the centered viewfinders of the X-T series models. The  instant picture review is easier and the reviewing (Play) push button is located on the bottom right side of the LVF.
       
      In all the Fujifilm X-E3 is a very convenient camera model that respond correctly to the compact size device but without sacrificing too much better handling compare to the larger DSLR model type.
       
      If you are already an owner of other Fujifilm X-series models you will fully enjoy that the X-E3 is using the same battery packs and external electronic flashes without forgetting that it is part of the same optical lens mount system.
       
       

       
      The Fujifilm X-E3 doesn't have an in-(camera)body-image-stabilization system (IBIS) and will rely on your ability to set and handle the camera to avoid generating blurry from the photographer's movement. Of course you can couple a lens with an optical image stabilization (OIS) that will help you to prevent that phenomena and further permit you to select lower shutter speed in low light situations or simply to get a smaller lens aperture (for increasing the deep of field). As a loosely rule of thumb, no stabilization is available with focal fix lenses (except for the new XF80mm F2.8 OIS Macro and the XF200mm F2 OIS) and it is the contrary with zoom lenses (with some noticeable exceptions such as the XF16-55mm F2.8 Pro). At this day the Fujifilm X-H1 is the only X-Series model equipped with an IBIS.
       
      What I am appreciated the most of the Fujifilm X-E3 is its compactness and its very discrete status in regard of other people ressent when they are facing the camera. It is what can call not only a user-friendly camera but also a subject-friendly photo device. Combined with a short fixe focal or short zoom lens, the X-E3 appears to be part of the family. It is not perceive as an agressive intruder of our life compare to the look with the DSLRs. So the interaction between the photographer and the subject is very different and much more positive.
       

       
      If you like Black & White photography you will adore to work with the Fujifilm X-E3. This lovely camera model offers you a choice of two monochrome reddition, standard Monochrome and Acros, with 3 different filtering variations, Yellow, Red or Green. So you can literally transform the X-E3 as a Monochrome camera without further expensive investment. (This remark is also good for the other Fujifilm models).
       
      Is it sufficient to simply have a good camera device that can deliver not only nice, well exposed and focused pictures but which is also a creative tool fun to use and to bring with you? Sure there will always be more performing camera models now and in the future and that is inevitable in this race for better human crafting. But in the mean time we have not to forget that the most interesting and rewarding think is to do photography.
       
      In a sense the Fujifilm X-E3 fulfill nicely the task of proximity photography essential in close urban situations or in interior contexts. The Fujifilm X-E3 is a compact photo companion that is not only a competent tool but is also an inspired creative device.
       

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