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Guest n2s

Fuji X100S images

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Guest n2s

Last two weeks I was taking the new Fuji X100s with me whenever possible and now I'm starting to get accustomed to it more and more. My normal street setup for the last 4 years was the D3 with a 50, but when I started in photography I had only one lens—35/2.8, so this is sort of back to the roots for me. 


For now I use the new Fuji mostly in A priority with ISO auto 200-3200 and minimum shutter of 1/125. 


I sought to post here few photos that I took while trying to "understand" the new camera.

 

post-38-1397539607_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-38-139753960704_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-38-139753960708_thumb.jpg

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I love my X-100, but since getting my X-Pro1 I've wished that the X-100 had the X-Pro's sensor. The X-100s is very tempting now because it has that same fantastic sensor.

 

Despite the rough start to life, things are getting worked out with the new technology, as well experience and practice with processing the results has things just getting better and better, it's much like using film again for the satisfaction the results give.

 

For one thing the X-Trans sensor does the best digital B&W (apart from the dedicated B&W Leica Monochrom) as you've demonstrated here, not bad at all for such little use with the camera so far. Wait until you really get experienced with it! :) I'm not sure exactly why, but these images have a very strong 1970's street photography look about them, which I like a lot.

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Guest n2s

Thank you Alan. I'm really enjoying using the X100S. I still need to break few dSLR habits and retrain my muscle memory. I've missed quite few shots because of slight hesitation.


The raw file processing is another big topic and I'm happy that the X100S has arrived at the moment when software manufactures made (finally) at least some progress. I've built a double illuminant DNG profile (warm sunny/shade) with the ColorChecker on the first day so that ACR conversion is not that far off in colours and tones distribution.


I think you're right about the B&W from the x-trans. I was pleasantly surprised that the images have less of "digital" feeling to them. This is something I didn't expect. I've tried the X-Pro and the X-E1 before, but didn't try B&W with them at all. 


Here are few shots of architectural subject matter. I'll post later also few images in colour.

 

post-38-139753960712_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-38-139753960717_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-38-13975396072_thumb.jpg

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Nice.

 

You've pretty much helped me make up my mind, I'll trade the X-100 in for the X-100s, even if I lose a lot in the swap.

 

The X-100 always promised to be the ideal walk-around street camera, but its B&W conversion was standard digital plastic-looking as common with Bayer array cameras.

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Guest n2s

Didn't mean to hurt your wallet Alan :)


I was actually wondering why B&W from the X100S looks different. Is Fuji managing internal processing pipeline (amps, ADCs, file creation) in a specific way or the X-Trans is so different. But if you say that B&W from the X100 is not at the level of the X-Pro, then I guess it is both—the sensor and some specific tweaks. Probably Fuji understands better their own sensor.


Here are few photos in colour. The first two are kept closer to the original "Fuji colours". I was trying to get a better feeling of the dynamic range of the X100s and how better expose to maximise the sensor's output. The last image is HDR from 3 bracketed images. The sky was a bit too bright and one exposure was not enough to capture the difference in clouds and at the same time keep some details in the central archway.

 

post-38-139753960724_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-38-13975396073_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-38-139753960736_thumb.jpg

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I think the greater randomness and higher green pixel proportion of the X-Trans' 6x6 array as opposed to the more regimented and uniform 2x2 Bayer array has a lot to do with the B&W friendliness of the X-Trans. When using ISO 800 and above with the camera set to 400% DR the tone response curve also takes on a very similar shape to that of film, which further enhances the effect.


DPReview tested the tonal response, and along with the D4 when set to its maximum DR were the two curves that rolled over and didn't exit the top of the graph, which in turn represents a resistance to blowing out highlights and resulting in a lowering of highlight contrast as is the case with film. There's one thing Fuji probably understands more than any other camera manufacturer, and that is film... :) It is in fact stated as one of their goals, achieving the "look" of film. The X-Trans is a huge step in that direction.

 

Credit to DPReview:

X-Pro1-Contrast-Mode-Curves_zps0c92410b.

 

As a consequence of my own observations and the DPReview charts, my camera is always set to 800 ISO as default, with DR at 400% regardless. Only in extremely bright light will I resort to dropping the ISO below 800.


With this setup I have virtually never run out of enough adjustment in ACR to get both shadow and highlight detail to avoid having to do HDR brackets (the shadows can get a bit grainy, but I'll live with that), which were a regular way of life for me with the D3s, yet another reason why I prefer to use the Fuji these days.

Edited by Alan

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As a X100 owner I find the X100s very tempting. I have just bought the X20 which also has a X-Trans sensor.

Fuji has re-invented itself in a short period of time. A Fuji X feels like a real camera again, not a computerized box.

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Guest n2s

Thanks for the tip Alan. I've set now one of the Custom Settings banks with DR400 and minimum ISO800 in Auto and will give it a go. When I first read about it in the manual it kind of didn't make much sense to me right away. Probably because from dSLR/MF practice it got imprinted in my head that lower ISO equals greater dynamic range and I didn't investigate it further.

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Luc, that sums up my feelings on the Fuji perfectly. I was no longer enjoying taking photos with the bloated, heavy electronic thing that Nikon pro cameras have become. The D2x was bad enough, but the D3s with RRS L bracket & strap became more like a medieval mace & chain in comparison to the F4 I used to love using, and even moreso this is true of the svelt Fuji.

 

And just to clarify my inadequately written response above should anyone else be unsure, I should have mentioned that my default 800 ISO is set because the DR 400% function only becomes available at or above 800 ISO.

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The experience of using the X100S is very different from dSLR (and most mirrorless too). Probably it is not for everyone, but I enjoy it very much. 


The images have a sense of contrast and smoothness at the same time—very easy to work with in post production. JPEG and Raw files straight out of the camera have already all the groundwork inside for a good B&W conversion.

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Great photos n2s.

It looks like a great camera with great results. Something ideal as a walk around/smaller camera.

It's certainly convinced Zack Arias and David Hobby.

Zack's blog posts:

http://zackarias.com/editorial-photography/galatasaray-bests-schalke-fuji-x100s-bests-leica/

http://zackarias.com/for-photographers/gear-gadgets/fuji-x100s-review-a-camera-walks-into-a-bar/

David's post:

http://www.strobist.blogspot.com.au/2013/03/in-depth-new-fujifilm-x100s.html

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Thanks Will,


Yes, I've read both of these posts on the 22nd in anticipation while the mailman was on his way with my parcel.  :)


I must admit that it was Zack who planted the idea of the X100S in my head while we were chatting last year at the Photokina. I'm glad I chose the X100S. As shooting experience at the moment for me it is on the firm second place after a technical camera. Operating the X100S is still not completely second nature for me yet, but i'm getting there.


Here are few more pictures that I took in order to get a better understanding of the dynamic range capabilities of this camera. All at base ISO 200, single exposure, no HDR or any kind of fancy processing.

 

post-38-139753961183_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-38-139753961208_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-38-139753961218_thumb.jpg

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