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Fujifilm X-E1

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If you have used the Fujifilm X-E1 mirrorless camera body please rate it on our poll and/or leave your thoughts in this thread. 

 

We will keep this thread relevant by moving off topic posts to other part of fotozones.com. 

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Guest Steve060758

Great image quality. The lack of an AA filter really makes a difference. Be sure to turn down noise reduction to -1 or even -2 for optimal resolution. The analog controls are pulled me in. It's old school but I missed using it on the Nikon DSLR's. The size is just right. Large enough to balance the lenses but not too large, pretty much FE-2 size but without the mirror box. I can carry it around all day.

 

It's not made for sports or action; the auto focus on mirrorless cameras can't match the DSLR, but that's ok with me, I'm not that kind of photographer. The in-camera jpegs are excellent but if you shoot RAW the latest LR 4.4 RC works well; Silkypix has a very strange user interface I just can't get used too. If you want to keep Fuji colors then use the in-camera RAW processor. The only down side is that in really crummy light the auto focus hunts. Some have complained that you can't set minimum shutter speed in auto ISO, but that's no problem if you just spin the shutter dial to what you want. Auto white balance seems spot on and the metering is good, but sometimes tends to overexpose in bright light; so make sure to check the histogram in the viewfinder and adjust the exposure compensation as needed. It only gets four stars because no camera is perfect, although I'd be hard pressed to find a legitimate fault. This camera excels at the core functions, produces excellent images and Fuji has delivered a set of great lenses so far.

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I really like the classic control layout and the nice glass in the Fuji lineup. I like the X-E1 for travel and streetphotography. Well actually I like it for many more uses. It's always in my rucksack when I go to work. There may always be something interesting to shoot.

 

It's interesting to see the resemblance to my 25 years old Nikon FM2 which was a milestone camera.

 

Regards, Daniel 

post-154-139753961495_thumb.jpg

Edited by Aerobat

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And you've nailed it in one photo as to why so many older-school photographers are jumping ship for the Fuji X system, Daniel. For years I've seen comments all over the place asking for a "digital version of the FM/FE Nikon". Fuji has given it to them, only many are a bit tardy in realizing this fact.

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Just got my X-E1 last week.  I used it for the first time in church Sunday. Great little camera for low light!  Also, I shot about 30 photos at the church and the 35mm Fuji lens nailed the focus each and every time.

 

Dave

Edited by webco

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I'm fairly new to the X-E1 also, coming from Sony NEX cameras where mirrorless is concerned.  The X-E1 for me is replacing a NEX-7.  So far I'm very impressed by the image quality.  While the sensor in the NEX-7 is excellent, I like the sensor in the X-E1 better.  High ISO IQ is amazing for APS-C format.  Then there are the Fuji lenses.  I have the 14mm, the 18-55, and the 35mm so far - all three are truly excellent.  Of the Sony lenses I had owned, none could match these Fuji lenses.  I never had the Sony Zeiss lens - that one might have been in the same ballpark as the Fujis.

 

Others have mentioned the controls, and I too feel very at home and in control with this camera.  The menu structure is way better than Sony's.  The real blessing however is I hardly ever need to use the Fuji menu system.  Between the direct controls, and the "Q" menu, all of the commonly used items are handled.

 

What do I miss from the Sony NEX cameras?  The tilting LCD for one thing.  I did use that quite often for waist-level shooting.  Also, focus peaking.  While not necessarily good for critical focusing, it is quick to use and most often accurate enough.  Having said that, I'm not really having any problem doing manual focus through Fuji's EVF.

 

As some have mentioned, the X-E1's AF is not for sports, and does struggle sometimes in low light.  Then again, the same is true with the NEX-7.  For all the complaining I've seen about Fuji's AF system, I personally did not find the NEX-7 to be any better.

 

Another small but handy thing with the X-E1 is I can easily trigger studio strobes, using the built-in flash in Commander mode.  Not so with the Sony NEX cameras, which required some work to get around the pre-flash.

 

In summary, there's certainly room for improvement (with any of the mirrorless cameras I've used).  But overall I love the X-E1, and love the results I'm getting from it.

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Like others here, I too took the plunge and bought an X-E1 (w/ 18-55) a while ago.

 

After only 1 day of trying things out, the 35mm f1.4 and a Samyang 8mm fisheye were ordered.

 

I've been so impressed with the output that my Nikon D2X, 17-55, and 10.5mm fisheye have now gone to a new home and my enthusiasm for the hobby has been totally revived.

 

I can honestly say since getting into the Fuji XF system my D3 and D3S have hardly seen the light of day.

 

Carrying a kit that fits into a small bag is absolute heaven compared to the literal pain of carrying equivalent spec Nikon pro level gear around, especially since there is no difference in quality.

 

My only gripe is the ease with which the exposure compensation dial can be inadvertently moved, but like anything new it's just a question of learning to look at the camera body or viewfinder icon before pressing the button.

 

Andrew


Andrew

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You are really going to like the 35mm f1.4. It is a very sweet lens. You'll just have to get used to always checking the exp comp dial. It is better than the one on the X100. The damn power switch gets turned on all the time too, but these are small things compared to all the things that are right.


There is nothing worse than a brilliant image of a fuzzy concept. - Ansel Adams

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Andrew, my experience has been the same - for my work the X-Pro1 completely trumps the D3s, with the exception of events recording but that was only due to me not having bought zoom lenses for it initially. Being a lit slower when using AI-s prime lenses via adapter meant that I was getting caught in the wrong place too often with no option to move in or back out, so had to change lenses instead. I'm in the middle of rectifying that, having bought the 18-55 last week and pre-ordering the 55-200 which is scheduled for delivery in the second week of June. At that point the D3s will cease to have any relevance, and I'll get rid of that and the two zoom lenses (16-35 & 24-140 f/4s) and use the proceeds to ultimately help get a second X-Pro1 (or 1s or 2 or whatever the update will be) and also the 23/1.4, 567/1.4 and 10-24 as they are released, plus, of course, keeping all my AI-s lenses, particularly the Micro-Nikkors, which work superbly on the X-Pro1.

 

That will make me 100% Fuji, and glad of it.


As for the comp. dial, I don't know anyone who didn't find that annoying at first but have got completely used to it after only a short time of using the camera.

 

I've found that an interesting side effect of checking the indicator in the viewfinder has made me more conscious and aware of the other settings at the same time, something I had got lazy about with the D3s where the indicators are a bit obscure, something not helped by my ongoing confusion with those two bloody command dials which results from a previous time in my career where the aperture was a ring on the lens and the shutter speed was a dial on the top, side or on the lens itself of the camera. The Fuji has restored that "correct" situation. Which dial did what never became automatic for me with the D* cameras, even though I've had to deal with them through four Nikon digital cameras over the years.

Edited by Alan

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Alan, I also have not touched my D3s since the X-E1 arrived at my house.  That's really saying something too, as I really like the D3s, as well as my Nikkors that go with it.  It's just that they're so big and heavy!  With the IQ and lens quality I'm getting with the Fuji gear, there's just little reason to go the dslr route for my general needs.  Only where AF performance of the Fuji is not good enough, or maybe for flash work (Nikon gear is really hard to beat for flash work).

 

In the meantime, I'm having a lot of fun with the X-E1.  Just today received the Kipon Nikon to Fuji X adapter (thanks for the tip Alan!).  It does indeed fit very nicely, and much better than the cheap adapter I bought initially.  Here are a couple of shots using Nikkors and that Kipon adapter:

 

Two portraits of our dogs from this afternoon, using a Nikkor 105mm f/2.5 AiS

i-xHjpvHB-XL.jpg

 

i-hrvf3m3-XL.jpg

 

One more from this afternoon, using a micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8

i-hP7GPKw-X2.jpg

Edited by mnscott

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I fear the Fuji is like heroin.... most addictive. :)

 

If the AF is too slow I just flick to manual and use the 10x for critical focusing - then unless the subject moves wildly in distance to or fro I'll shoot a few frames between rechecking focus. Seems to work well enough, and just another harking back to the way it used to be done (only now it's with far greater accuracy). Perhaps that's one of the joys of using this camera - you get to feel that you're it's master, as in I'll tell the camera when it's in focus and exactly where that focus should be, not the other way around. I've used the D3s only once since the beginning of last December.

 

I really can't wait for the 55-200 to get here, just so I can see whether complete ship-jumping might be wholly practical. The kit I will have then almost equates what I used throughout '90's & early '00's with film - F4, 20mm, 24mm, 35-70mm, 80-200mm, 50mm, 60mm, only a bit more reach thanks to the APS-C and a bit more wide thanks to the 8mm fisheye. I managed OK back then, I think this should be more than OK now.

 

For macro I'm better served these days, I still have my 60mm AF-D Micro, but also have the 105/2.8 & 200/4 micros, plus PB-4 bellows, all of which I didn't have back then. With stitching and/or the Fuji's phenomenal B&W rendition there's no need for me to replace the Hasselblad 500 EL/M & 500 C/M, 40mm, 50mm, 80mm, 150mm & 250mm outfit I used to have, either - the Fuji does covers that as well quality-wise. I still have an RB & RZ with 50, 90 & 180 if film be needed, anyway.

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Alan,

It was largely down to your experience shared over on NG that convinced me to take the plunge. I recently acquired a cheap Chinese adapter and tried my wife's Nikon 55-200 on fast moving subjects as a proof of concept exercise with very promising results. I look forward to your evaluation of the new Fuji lens.

For the moment my D3's are only used with big gun NIkkors on a gimble set up where fast AF is required.

Thinking about it, years ago I was able to do everything with a pair of FM's, so perhaps I just need to re-learn the long forgotten MF techniques.

If the next generations of body from Fuji have improved AF, which better suit some of my photography needs, then I too could make the switch completely. Exciting times.


Andrew

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I hope my enthusiasm for the Fuji cameras doesn't end up with disgruntled people who don't share my appreciation of the camera to put out a contract on me.... :o - however, when I get enthusiastic about something in which I can see game-changing potential, I'm hard to shut up. :)

 

The last camera I got so enthusiastic about was the D3. That camera took digital to being a maybe-equal (but more often not) of film to being well beyond the capabilities of 35mm film in one fell swoop. At the time I was still doing weddings, perpetually hamstrung by grumpy priests who wouldn't let me use flash in their church, and I became an instant hero to both the priests and brides & grooms by shooting  entire wedding ceremonies without flash or tripod - aside from the shutter noise they wouldn't have even known I was there, and the shots gained an ambiance previously unobtainable to shots taken with flash (when I was allowed) or the static viewpoints and blurred subject movement when shot off tripod at the maximum of 400 ISO that I used, either in film days or with my D2x.

 

3200 & 6400 ISO opened up a whole new way of doing this sort of stuff hand held, sans flash.

 

If I were to ever do another wedding, the Fuji would take things that one step further by being so quiet that they won't hear me, and so small that I'll blend into the background, all without losing any functionality - the Fuji does 6400 ISO with as much competence as the D3 did, and is only marginally behind the D3s.

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Once I grow up I'll become a fire truck...

 

Fuji X-E1, 35mm f/1.4, F4.0, 1/200s, ISO 200 

post-154-139753961503_thumb.jpg

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Here's another view of the comparisons of different paths. The Nikon FE has a 50mm lens. The D800 has a 24-70mm lens. The X-E1 has the 18-55 mm lens. The D800 and X-E1 outfits are fairly comparable for focal length. When going out where either package would meet the requirements. the X-E1 package seems to go with me more often. 

 

Even indoors sneaking in a casual shot of my daughter planning a quick trip up to the mountains to walk the dog, I think the X-E1 jpg files SOOC have pretty good color and texture. 

 

I think with the improvements that will be made in this family of cameras is going to bring even more converts to a system that provides excellent results already. 

 

I really did not want to support two systems, but the ergonomics and quality of the Fuji X system has seduced me. Not sure where this is going to lead. 

post-16-139753961542_thumb.jpg

post-16-139753961554_thumb.jpg

Edited by Longhiker
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There is nothing worse than a brilliant image of a fuzzy concept. - Ansel Adams

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Although not taken with an X-E1 so a bit off topic, I thought this might back up what I've been contemplating for a while now, taken by the victor (X-Pro1) of the vanquished as it disappears below packaging prior to making its way off to be recycled into new Fuji X equipment (all of which would probably fit into the box the just the D3s body came in... ;) ) :

 

_DSF7263_zpsb027d3ef.jpg

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That's quite a decision and I can see why. My brandnew D800 hasn't seen any usage for about 4 months now and this doesn't seem to improve. I always think I might use it more but I just don't feel like lugging it around anymore. But I probably won't sell it for quite some time.
I've just had my FM2 refurbished by Nikon. Light baffles have been replaced, lightmeter checked, times adjusted, cleaned and lubricated. I was surprised they still service such old cameras. I'll use it lightly on some occasions. The FM2 has the right size body and precise build.

Regards, Daniel

Edited by Aerobat

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I've been contemplating the same move.  My big Nikon dslr gear has not seen any use in months.  The only thing stopping me from selling my D3s and related gear is the things it does better than the Fuji X-E1.  Focus tracking for example.  Also, it's hard to beat Nikon's flash technology.  Do I use either of those things often?  No.  Does it make sense to keep all of that money tied up in gear I rarely use?  That's the debate going on in my head now.

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The X-E1 is always ready to catch a glimpse...

post-154-139753963108_thumb.jpg

Edited by Aerobat

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LOL, Daniel - what a brilliant capture!

 

Scott, my D3s was used once in about 8 months before I decided to take the plunge. On that occasion I only got it out because I was doing a small birthday function and didn't have an AF zoom for the Fuji yet, and manually changing lenses was too slow. As of Friday or early next week I'll have a zoom spread from 18-200 with two small lenses, losing only 1/2 stop at the long end from my 16-35 & 24-120 f4 Nikkors in comparison so that situation will be rectified. I'll address the extreme wide zoom end as soon as the 10-24 Fujinon is released as well.

I have an EF-42 flash for the X-Pro1 for emergency use, and while it is nowhere near as competent as the Nikon SB-800, it does the job at least to the degree that all my yesteryear Metz CT flashes used to. I got by well enough back then when flash was actually essential in many cases, so this really isn't a problem. It is a pity that the SB won't work on the Fuji all the same.

However, as you say - how often is it needed anyway? With practical ISO 6400 there really is limited need in darker situations, and as I never was a proponent of fill flash in bright situations the Fuji-X DR400% setting practically obviates any need for it anyway with its ability to haul detail back from shadows and highlights in PP.

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Daniel, I love that shot!  Particularly that everyone in the frame seems oblivious to the...um, moment.

 

Alan, my copy of the 55-200 just arrived yesterday.  Haven't really shot with it yet, but will over the weekend.  I will report back with impressions.

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Really looking forward to your experience with the 55-200


Andrew

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So far I've only had time for a few snaps in the back yard.  This weekend I expect to give the 55-200 more of a workout.  Also should make another thread when I have more to share about the lens.  For now, I can report it seems very sharp.  Compared to Sony's 55-210 for the NEX series, the Fuji appears to be better in nearly every respect.  Build quality feels noticeably better.  It also seems sharper, with better contrast and generally fewer issues (like CA).  How is the Sony better?  Well, it is lighter, but that is because the Fuji is faster and better build quality.  And the Sony is less expensive - about half the price of the Fuji, in fact.  Again, that is because the Fuji is faster and better build quality, and better optically too I believe from my short time with it.  So I guess the Fuji 55-200 really is better than the Sony equivalent after all.  :lol:

 

Here are a couple of early samples from my very brief time with it today.  The first two are of our dogs, who are among my favorite test targets.  :D  The flower shot shows it can also make non-dog images.

 

i-vGJ5kVJ-X2.jpg

 

 

i-Qdc2Gxv-X2.jpg

 

i-dvxRpjQ-X2.jpg

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I will make a thread for the new Fuji zooms shortly. :) 

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Hedgehog loves strawberries...

 

A rare occasion to see a hedgehog in daylight. The X-E1 was luckily with me.

post-154-139753963348_thumb.jpg

Edited by Aerobat

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  • Similar Content

    • By danielm
      Let us rewind to the analog film days of photography. The 35-50mm taking lenses were kings of their era and were present to almost every manufacturer systems offered. Their maximum aperture were ranging from a modest F3.5 to an astounding F1.2 if you were able to afford it.
       
      With the introduction of electronic autofocus and motorized cameras  they were replaced by a plethora of different trans-standard zoom lenses from the cheapest ones to the expensive "pro" such as the 24-70mm F2.8. And that tendency has been replicated right from the start of the digital cameras era.
       
       
       

       
      With an angle of view of 63 degrees the Fujinon XF23mm F2 R WR can be assimilated as a "eye-normal" standard lens although for some their opinion is that this Fujinon model is a bit too wide to be classified easily in that category. Its close focusing ability is good and this caracteristic contribute largely to its versatility. It is not a (head) portrait optic but surely you can work full body view portrait with confidence and proximity of your main subject.
       
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      We cannot escape the (Leica) Summicron lens series analogy even if we are speaking of two very different
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      The two control rings of the Fujinon XF23mm F2 R WR allow you to select your aperture and adjust your focus manually if needed or hoped. In the case of the aperture it is handy to be able to better control the deep of field of your subject and also with the focusing ring have the capacity to choose the optimal focus point. The Fujifilm lens hood furnished with the lens is small and none-protuberant (You can leave on almost permanently except if you intend to use optional 43mm screw-in filters).
       

       
      What about the optical quality image output of the Fujinon XF23mm F2 R WR lens? Suffice to say that I cannot see any noticeable (for me!) between this optic compare to the others Fujifilm XF series lenses. To be more reassured you can consult the numerous technical tests over the web. But in my sens the best way of evaluating a lens for your specific needs is to take pictures with it. It can fit or not your style of photography and respond accordingly to your specific technical way of taking pictures. In some countries Fujifilm offers "try and test" session or even loan programs to do so.
       
      So the Fujinon XF23mm F2 R WR lens is it for you or not? That is the big question. Focal fixed lenses are optics that are asking a photographer adaptability to be ensure their complete useful. So your mobility is a key point of success when you intend to select that category of optics.  If you feel better and confortable to work from a fixed point of view and reframe with a variable focal zoom lens that can be a big issue. On the contrary if you are a kind of "active" photo takers this Fujinon XF23mm F2 R WR can be be an creative and easy manageable answer (as for all the others focal fix Fujinon lenses).
       
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    • By danielm
      Let us rewind to the analog film days of photography. The 35-50mm taking lenses were kings of their era and were present to almost every manufacturer systems offered. Their maximum aperture were ranging from a modest F3.5 to an astounding F1.2 if you were able to afford it.
       
      With the introduction of electronic autofocus and motorized cameras  they were replaced by a plethora of different trans-standard zoom lenses from the cheapest ones to the expensive "pro" such as the 24-70mm F2.8. And that tendency has been replicated right from the start of the digital cameras era.
       
       
       

       
      With an angle of view of 63 degrees the Fujinon XF23mm F2 R WR can be assimilated as a "eye-normal" standard lens although for some their opinion is that this Fujinon model is a bit too wide to be classified easily in that category. Its close focusing ability is good and this caracteristic contribute largely to its versatility. It is not a (head) portrait optic but surely you can work full body view portrait with confidence and proximity of your main subject.
       
      The Fujinon XF23mm F2 R WR lens is a useful "interior" lens providing you are not looking for a very wide view (the Fujinon XF16mm F2.8 or XF10-24mm F4 R OIS lenses for example should be more interesting choices in that case). For sure in some narrow contexts you will need to contorsion yourself to embrass the whole subject.
       
      Because of its reduced size, this Fujinon XF23mm f2 R WR is a discrete optic and more if it is coupled with a Fujifilm X-E or X-M series camera body. This particular nature will be fully appreciated if you doing street, travel or casual photography in giving you the possibility to be more spontaneous in your activity.
       

      We cannot escape the (Leica) Summicron lens series analogy even if we are speaking of two very different
       lines of optics especially considering the electronic involvement into the Fujinon X-series.
       
      The two control rings of the Fujinon XF23mm F2 R WR allow you to select your aperture and adjust your focus manually if needed or hoped. In the case of the aperture it is handy to be able to better control the deep of field of your subject and also with the focusing ring have the capacity to choose the optimal focus point. The Fujifilm lens hood furnished with the lens is small and none-protuberant (You can leave on almost permanently except if you intend to use optional 43mm screw-in filters).
       

       
      What about the optical quality image output of the Fujinon XF23mm F2 R WR lens? Suffice to say that I cannot see any noticeable (for me!) between this optic compare to the others Fujifilm XF series lenses. To be more reassured you can consult the numerous technical tests over the web. But in my sens the best way of evaluating a lens for your specific needs is to take pictures with it. It can fit or not your style of photography and respond accordingly to your specific technical way of taking pictures. In some countries Fujifilm offers "try and test" session or even loan programs to do so.
       
      So the Fujinon XF23mm F2 R WR lens is it for you or not? That is the big question. Focal fixed lenses are optics that are asking a photographer adaptability to be ensure their complete useful. So your mobility is a key point of success when you intend to select that category of optics.  If you feel better and confortable to work from a fixed point of view and reframe with a variable focal zoom lens that can be a big issue. On the contrary if you are a kind of "active" photo takers this Fujinon XF23mm F2 R WR can be be an creative and easy manageable answer (as for all the others focal fix Fujinon lenses).
       
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      View full article
    • By danielm
      I've got a long love affair with the original rangefinder cameras (Leica M4-P & M6) and the now digital rangefinder style cameras (Fujifilm X-E2, X-E2S & X-E3). I don't know if it is due of the fact that their viewfinder is located off center (meaning not in the same optical axe of the picture taking lens). But that peculiar camera body design seems to stimulate my creativity and my motivation to brought the camera in places and at moments that I will have a tendency to ignore.
       
      The Fujifilm X-E3 is the fourth version of a popular model design that many photographers like to bring with them as their main camera or at least as their back up camera body that happens to becoming eventually their most used. The X-E3 is using the same 24MP image sensor that the X-T2 and the X-T20 have. So the picture quality is at par of the two last mentioned models.
       
      One of the thing which most interesting when you are using a rangefinder style digital camera is the fact that they are less noticeable, less protuberant, less intrusive in front of the subject.. This characteristic to be more discrete is always appreciated by the spontaneous photographer on the street, during a travel and even when you taking a candid portrait of a person (The camera seems to be less "serious").
       
      Many people were tempted to make the comparaison with the Fujifilm X100F which a compact APS-C digital camera doted with a similar fixed lens of 23mm. If you combine the Xf23mm F2.0 lens with the Fujifilm X-E3 the two cameras will give the same angle of view. But the Fujifilm X100F is more a (large) pocket camera while the Fujifilm X-E3 is an interchangeable lens model that have a more standard dimension.
       

      Fujifilm X-E3 w/ Fujinon XF55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS
       
      Most people will talk in length about the good or the bad handling of a camera model. It is always a very personal and intuitive impression at the end. Ergonomics are designed by technicians that are biased by their own physical and cultural differences. All this has been said one thing that I have experimented with the Fujifilm X-E3 is its fine ergonomic in terms of the camera body and lens combination and I am surprise how good and easy it is still true even when you are using a larger zoom lens such as the Fujinon XF55-200 F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS. As a travel or street photographer I fully appreciate this ability.
       

       
      About the tiny Fujifilm EF-X8 electronic flash which is included with the furnished camera accessories I was skeptical of its practical use but I have found it very easy to bring with me and positioning on the X-E3 (You can leave it at rest on the Fujifilm X-E3 camera at its down off-position). Dont forget that the EF-X8 is using the battery pack power of your camera. As a fill-flash and as an emergency flash unit are may be the two best tasks of the EF-X8. For a more extended use of an electronic flash it is better to couple an external unit doted with its own power management.
       

      Window back lightning interior ambiant light exposed
       
      Using a fill-in flash can be one of the most rewarding thing to do with interior photography with subject that are backlighted during the daylight period. The color temperature is similar between the ambiant natural light and the electronic flash output and the only big task is to choose an interesting exposure balance between the two in preserving or not the shadows or even simply voluntarily underexposure the ambiant (effect often use in fashion photography).
       

      Using the Fujifilm F-X8 as a fill-in flash
       
      Small in-board camera flashes are a very handy solution but they are located usually too near the taking lens  and often interfering with the lens hood that you have to remove to prevent incomplete flash coverage. The Fujifilm EF-X8 give a more elevated flash reflector position. You just have to push it in its down position if you want to shut its power off.
       
      Officially the Fujifilm X-E3 is a less "sporty" camera model than let's say the X-T series models such as the X-T20 or the X-T2 or even the X-H1. The off-center viewfinder may create a small different perspective between you naked eye and the image recorded by the taking lens but if your concentrate your attention to your viewfinder it wont be noticeable. So spontaneous photography stay a strong opportunity.
       

       
      As for most of the Fujifilm X-series camera models, the controls of the photo basic parameters are designed in a similar fashion way as it is used to be for the traditional analog (film) cameras. Shutter speed, lens aperture, exposure correction and focusing options including manual adjustment can be selected with direct dials or control rings. The others parameters have to be adjusted through push buttons, touch screen options or using the versatile joystick located beside the rear screen. All these functionality controls need to be learn before really be able to master them without hesitation.
       
      Using the Quick menu (Q) and reprogramming certains function controls can facilitate the handling of the Fujifilm X-E3. Most of the menu option presentations are easy to understand and interact but some functionalities may need more time and essaies to get the habit. There is a lot of autofocusing modes at your disposal that can tailored your shooting workflow. The all-"AUTO" option (lever next to the shutter speed dial) is a good idea for emergency snapshot without disturbing your already programed setting.
       

       
      The electronic viewfinder (EVF) is fine detailed with all the (configurable) information you need and got an auto-rotation presentation very useful for vertical framing. In some specific situations the image on the EVF will be more contrasting making more difficult to evaluate low and highlights. For people who are wearing glasses like me the eye relief is more limit and will ask you to pay more attention to the corner of your framing composition of your subject. The back and none-orientable live screen (LVF) give you a better reviewing rendition of your picture facilitating a deeper image analysis.
       
      The side location of the Fujifilm X-E3 electronic viewfinder may give you a better viewing confort compare to the centered viewfinders of the X-T series models. The  instant picture review is easier and the reviewing (Play) push button is located on the bottom right side of the LVF.
       
      In all the Fujifilm X-E3 is a very convenient camera model that respond correctly to the compact size device but without sacrificing too much better handling compare to the larger DSLR model type.
       
      If you are already an owner of other Fujifilm X-series models you will fully enjoy that the X-E3 is using the same battery packs and external electronic flashes without forgetting that it is part of the same optical lens mount system.
       
       

       
      The Fujifilm X-E3 doesn't have an in-(camera)body-image-stabilization system (IBIS) and will rely on your ability to set and handle the camera to avoid generating blurry from the photographer's movement. Of course you can couple a lens with an optical image stabilization (OIS) that will help you to prevent that phenomena and further permit you to select lower shutter speed in low light situations or simply to get a smaller lens aperture (for increasing the deep of field). As a loosely rule of thumb, no stabilization is available with focal fix lenses (except for the new XF80mm F2.8 OIS Macro and the XF200mm F2 OIS) and it is the contrary with zoom lenses (with some noticeable exceptions such as the XF16-55mm F2.8 Pro). At this day the Fujifilm X-H1 is the only X-Series model equipped with an IBIS.
       
      What I am appreciated the most of the Fujifilm X-E3 is its compactness and its very discrete status in regard of other people ressent when they are facing the camera. It is what can call not only a user-friendly camera but also a subject-friendly photo device. Combined with a short fixe focal or short zoom lens, the X-E3 appears to be part of the family. It is not perceive as an agressive intruder of our life compare to the look with the DSLRs. So the interaction between the photographer and the subject is very different and much more positive.
       

       
      If you like Black & White photography you will adore to work with the Fujifilm X-E3. This lovely camera model offers you a choice of two monochrome reddition, standard Monochrome and Acros, with 3 different filtering variations, Yellow, Red or Green. So you can literally transform the X-E3 as a Monochrome camera without further expensive investment. (This remark is also good for the other Fujifilm models).
       
      Is it sufficient to simply have a good camera device that can deliver not only nice, well exposed and focused pictures but which is also a creative tool fun to use and to bring with you? Sure there will always be more performing camera models now and in the future and that is inevitable in this race for better human crafting. But in the mean time we have not to forget that the most interesting and rewarding think is to do photography.
       
      In a sense the Fujifilm X-E3 fulfill nicely the task of proximity photography essential in close urban situations or in interior contexts. The Fujifilm X-E3 is a compact photo companion that is not only a competent tool but is also an inspired creative device.
       
    • By danielm
      I've got a long love affair with the original rangefinder cameras (Leica M4-P & M6) and the now digital rangefinder style cameras (Fujifilm X-E2, X-E2S & X-E3). I don't know if it is due of the fact that their viewfinder is located off center (meaning not in the same optical axe of the picture taking lens). But that peculiar camera body design seems to stimulate my creativity and my motivation to brought the camera in places and at moments that I will have a tendency to ignore.
       
      The Fujifilm X-E3 is the fourth version of a popular model design that many photographers like to bring with them as their main camera or at least as their back up camera body that happens to becoming eventually their most used. The X-E3 is using the same 24MP image sensor that the X-T2 and the X-T20 have. So the picture quality is at par of the two last mentioned models.
       
      One of the thing which most interesting when you are using a rangefinder style digital camera is the fact that they are less noticeable, less protuberant, less intrusive in front of the subject.. This characteristic to be more discrete is always appreciated by the spontaneous photographer on the street, during a travel and even when you taking a candid portrait of a person (The camera seems to be less "serious").
       
      Many people were tempted to make the comparaison with the Fujifilm X100F which a compact APS-C digital camera doted with a similar fixed lens of 23mm. If you combine the Xf23mm F2.0 lens with the Fujifilm X-E3 the two cameras will give the same angle of view. But the Fujifilm X100F is more a (large) pocket camera while the Fujifilm X-E3 is an interchangeable lens model that have a more standard dimension.
       

      Fujifilm X-E3 w/ Fujinon XF55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS
       
      Most people will talk in length about the good or the bad handling of a camera model. It is always a very personal and intuitive impression at the end. Ergonomics are designed by technicians that are biased by their own physical and cultural differences. All this has been said one thing that I have experimented with the Fujifilm X-E3 is its fine ergonomic in terms of the camera body and lens combination and I am surprise how good and easy it is still true even when you are using a larger zoom lens such as the Fujinon XF55-200 F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS. As a travel or street photographer I fully appreciate this ability.
       

       
      About the tiny Fujifilm EF-X8 electronic flash which is included with the furnished camera accessories I was skeptical of its practical use but I have found it very easy to bring with me and positioning on the X-E3 (You can leave it at rest on the Fujifilm X-E3 camera at its down off-position). Dont forget that the EF-X8 is using the battery pack power of your camera. As a fill-flash and as an emergency flash unit are may be the two best tasks of the EF-X8. For a more extended use of an electronic flash it is better to couple an external unit doted with its own power management.
       

      Window back lightning interior ambiant light exposed
       
      Using a fill-in flash can be one of the most rewarding thing to do with interior photography with subject that are backlighted during the daylight period. The color temperature is similar between the ambiant natural light and the electronic flash output and the only big task is to choose an interesting exposure balance between the two in preserving or not the shadows or even simply voluntarily underexposure the ambiant (effect often use in fashion photography).
       

      Using the Fujifilm F-X8 as a fill-in flash
       
      Small in-board camera flashes are a very handy solution but they are located usually too near the taking lens  and often interfering with the lens hood that you have to remove to prevent incomplete flash coverage. The Fujifilm EF-X8 give a more elevated flash reflector position. You just have to push it in its down position if you want to shut its power off.
       
      Officially the Fujifilm X-E3 is a less "sporty" camera model than let's say the X-T series models such as the X-T20 or the X-T2 or even the X-H1. The off-center viewfinder may create a small different perspective between you naked eye and the image recorded by the taking lens but if your concentrate your attention to your viewfinder it wont be noticeable. So spontaneous photography stay a strong opportunity.
       

       
      As for most of the Fujifilm X-series camera models, the controls of the photo basic parameters are designed in a similar fashion way as it is used to be for the traditional analog (film) cameras. Shutter speed, lens aperture, exposure correction and focusing options including manual adjustment can be selected with direct dials or control rings. The others parameters have to be adjusted through push buttons, touch screen options or using the versatile joystick located beside the rear screen. All these functionality controls need to be learn before really be able to master them without hesitation.
       
      Using the Quick menu (Q) and reprogramming certains function controls can facilitate the handling of the Fujifilm X-E3. Most of the menu option presentations are easy to understand and interact but some functionalities may need more time and essaies to get the habit. There is a lot of autofocusing modes at your disposal that can tailored your shooting workflow. The all-"AUTO" option (lever next to the shutter speed dial) is a good idea for emergency snapshot without disturbing your already programed setting.
       

       
      The electronic viewfinder (EVF) is fine detailed with all the (configurable) information you need and got an auto-rotation presentation very useful for vertical framing. In some specific situations the image on the EVF will be more contrasting making more difficult to evaluate low and highlights. For people who are wearing glasses like me the eye relief is more limit and will ask you to pay more attention to the corner of your framing composition of your subject. The back and none-orientable live screen (LVF) give you a better reviewing rendition of your picture facilitating a deeper image analysis.
       
      The side location of the Fujifilm X-E3 electronic viewfinder may give you a better viewing confort compare to the centered viewfinders of the X-T series models. The  instant picture review is easier and the reviewing (Play) push button is located on the bottom right side of the LVF.
       
      In all the Fujifilm X-E3 is a very convenient camera model that respond correctly to the compact size device but without sacrificing too much better handling compare to the larger DSLR model type.
       
      If you are already an owner of other Fujifilm X-series models you will fully enjoy that the X-E3 is using the same battery packs and external electronic flashes without forgetting that it is part of the same optical lens mount system.
       
       

       
      The Fujifilm X-E3 doesn't have an in-(camera)body-image-stabilization system (IBIS) and will rely on your ability to set and handle the camera to avoid generating blurry from the photographer's movement. Of course you can couple a lens with an optical image stabilization (OIS) that will help you to prevent that phenomena and further permit you to select lower shutter speed in low light situations or simply to get a smaller lens aperture (for increasing the deep of field). As a loosely rule of thumb, no stabilization is available with focal fix lenses (except for the new XF80mm F2.8 OIS Macro and the XF200mm F2 OIS) and it is the contrary with zoom lenses (with some noticeable exceptions such as the XF16-55mm F2.8 Pro). At this day the Fujifilm X-H1 is the only X-Series model equipped with an IBIS.
       
      What I am appreciated the most of the Fujifilm X-E3 is its compactness and its very discrete status in regard of other people ressent when they are facing the camera. It is what can call not only a user-friendly camera but also a subject-friendly photo device. Combined with a short fixe focal or short zoom lens, the X-E3 appears to be part of the family. It is not perceive as an agressive intruder of our life compare to the look with the DSLRs. So the interaction between the photographer and the subject is very different and much more positive.
       

       
      If you like Black & White photography you will adore to work with the Fujifilm X-E3. This lovely camera model offers you a choice of two monochrome reddition, standard Monochrome and Acros, with 3 different filtering variations, Yellow, Red or Green. So you can literally transform the X-E3 as a Monochrome camera without further expensive investment. (This remark is also good for the other Fujifilm models).
       
      Is it sufficient to simply have a good camera device that can deliver not only nice, well exposed and focused pictures but which is also a creative tool fun to use and to bring with you? Sure there will always be more performing camera models now and in the future and that is inevitable in this race for better human crafting. But in the mean time we have not to forget that the most interesting and rewarding think is to do photography.
       
      In a sense the Fujifilm X-E3 fulfill nicely the task of proximity photography essential in close urban situations or in interior contexts. The Fujifilm X-E3 is a compact photo companion that is not only a competent tool but is also an inspired creative device.
       

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