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Eb Mueller

Jumping the Moon

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I anticipated a timely moonrise behind the nesting Great Blue Herons.  The nests are about 125 yards distant and as much as I tried, I couldn't line up the moon parallax with a clear shot of a bird until the very end, almost fully dark.  It takes two shots, one for the moon and one for the bird combined in Zerene Stacker, (works better than trying to blend with layer masks in photoshop!)  The bird indeed jumped the moon, but I was focused on the moon at that time and not the bird! :(  Click for a more detailed, larger view.

BTW, the rookery is quite large, somewhere over 100 nests.  I was using a Better Beamer to try and get some light on the birds, but all I managed was to create headlights! :D

 

 

D800E, 200-400 VRII + TC14EII, 1/800, f/5.6, 1600 iso

 

original.jpg

 

 

 

 

D800E, 200-400 VRII + TC14EII, 1/1000s f/5.6 at 550.0mm iso400

 

original.jpg

Edited by Eb Mueller

Eb Mueller

British Columbia, Canada

http://www.pbase.com/emueller

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Fantastic!!

I am just wondering: monopod, tripod???

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Guest Foveola

Eb:

 

The top image is quite striking, the moon pulls you in and then the eye wanders around to take in the bird and other details.

 

I have mixed feelings about the 'red eye' on the heron.  In some ways it echoes the moon, which is good, but in general I don't like red eye, so perhaps try it both ways and see what works best for you.  

 

The lower image has too much clutter for my tastes.

 

Cheers

 

Randy

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I was amazed by the first pic and then disappointed to see it is a combination of two shots.

The second one is wonderful.

Congrats.


Aguinaldo

www.aguinaldodepaula.com

Nikon / Zeiss

"You are not a loser when you're defeated.
You are a loser when you quit".
(Dr. House)

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Fantastic!!

I am just wondering: monopod, tripod???

Thanks , Andrew!  The lens is mounted on a gimbal head on a tripod.  The moon is seen to move slightly between the two shots, in the few seconds as focus is racked back and forth between the bird and the moon.  That slight movement is retouched in the focus stacking software.


Eb Mueller

British Columbia, Canada

http://www.pbase.com/emueller

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Eb:

 

The top image is quite striking, the moon pulls you in and then the eye wanders around to take in the bird and other details.

 

I have mixed feelings about the 'red eye' on the heron.  In some ways it echoes the moon, which is good, but in general I don't like red eye, so perhaps try it both ways and see what works best for you.  

 

The lower image has too much clutter for my tastes.

 

Cheers

 

Randy

Thanks, Randy!  I appreciate the in-depth discussion!  I will be reducing the size of the red-eye and compare, as you suggest.  The second image was included more for reference to the setting, knowing it was not going to steal any thunder from the first!  It also gives some idea about the amount of cropping involved in the first.


Eb Mueller

British Columbia, Canada

http://www.pbase.com/emueller

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I was amazed by the first pic and then disappointed to see it is a combination of two shots.

The second one is wonderful.

Congrats.

Thanks, Atpaula!  I'm curious as to why the disappointment in the focus stacking of two images?  Nothing is altered or composited of the original scene.  I frequently use this technique with macro photography.  If you are interested, Michael Erlewine has published numerous videos on the subject in the macro and close-up forum.  It is the only way to go where it is not possible to achieve enough depth of field!  Handy for landscapes, too!  Sometimes, a shot for the foreground and one for the background is all it takes when a hyperfocal distance can not be achieved by conventional means.

Edited by Eb Mueller

Eb Mueller

British Columbia, Canada

http://www.pbase.com/emueller

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Thanks, Atpaula!  I'm curious as to why the disappointment in the focus stacking of two images?  Nothing is altered or composited of the original scene.  I frequently use this technique with macro photography.  If you are interested, Michael Erlewine has published numerous videos on the subject in the macro and close-up forum.  It is the only way to go where it is not possible to achieve enough depth of field!  Handy for landscapes, too!  Sometimes, a shot for the foreground and one for the background is all it takes when a hyperfocal distance can not be achieved by conventional means.

Thanks for the explanation Eb.

I thought it was two images from separate places. 

I'm kind of old fashion.

Best regards.


Aguinaldo

www.aguinaldodepaula.com

Nikon / Zeiss

"You are not a loser when you're defeated.
You are a loser when you quit".
(Dr. House)

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Thanks for the explanation Eb.

I thought it was two images from separate places. 

I'm kind of old fashion.

Best regards.

Sorry to be tardy in my reply, Aquinaldo!  I also appreciated you raising a concern that I may have composited the moon image.

 

I'm rather "old fashioned" as well!   :D  (Certainly old enough to be out of fashion!)  There are many post processing techniques and filters which I do not care to adopt.


Eb Mueller

British Columbia, Canada

http://www.pbase.com/emueller

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