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Guest nfoto

Challenges Arrival

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Guest nfoto

I need to remind myself that despite the current -12 C outside and a winter filled with cold-related asthma issues, scenes like this are just a few weeks ahead in time.

The crown and upper stems of our two main birch species turn beautiful reddish or light magenta when spring draws closer and sap starts to rise after the long freezing winter. Using a long lens to flatten the perspective makes the colour shift even more apparent.

Zoom-Nikkor 360-1200 mm f/11 at 1200 mm, f/22, 1/50 sec (D3X)

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Taken at Nordre Øyeren Nature Reserve, Norway, the largest inland delta in Northern Europe. The background in this frame is nearly 4 km away.

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Guest nfoto

Aargh. This is going to take some time. Spring is not here for a while. More snow coming.

This is yesterday with my newly CPU-modified 15 mm f/3.5 Nikkor AIS on the Fuji S3.

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Main challenge now is keeping up the patience.

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Bjørn, the top image is breathtakingly beautiful! Particularly I like the gradation of the red color of the foliage. How does that happen? Is the gradaton caused by the haze due to the super-tele shot?


"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

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Guest nfoto

Akira: it is not foliage, but colour of the branches and stems of these birch trees. They take on these reddish to magenta hues just a short time of the year, when the ground thaw and the sap starts to rise. There always is variability in the colouration due to differences in growth stages, dampness of the ground, what species [of birch] is present, and so on. Although all of this is clearly visible to the naked eye, the subtle changes of colours often are much better appreciated when you shoot decidious forests using a long lens. This delta is perfect as the ground is fairly flat and many trees are in the same age bracket.

The immense and often rapid changes in the manifestations of nature are what makes nature photography so enjoyable in the Nordic countries.

I'll dig up a few more from my archive to show the yearly cycle. Stay tuned.

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Guest nfoto

Now, let's have a quick tour.

The delta in winter (D2X, 200/2)

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Early springtime. Wildfires are common, but the riparian delta forest isn't dry dry enough for them to cause much damage. The end effect is that remains of dead grass are burnt away and everything else survives (F5, 50-300 ED).

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Late April, the birches take on their intense sap-rise colouration (F4, 300/2.8 + 1.4X)

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Sap rise time in the riparian forests (F5, 400/3.5). Catkin-bearing alders add to the variegated colours.

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The explosive effect of leafing to the landscape is remarkable. The birches have foliage without cuticula (waxy cover) to the leaves just for a short while after the buds open, and this lends the foliage with a glowing green colour of immense beauty, the very epitome of Nordic nature. Sadly, it is quickly gone and the forests turn dull green for the remainder of the season. (D1X, 300/2.8 AFI + 2X)

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Autumn colours typically are transient as the winds can be very strong here in the open landscape. So trees often are defoliated by wind while thier neighbours still carry green foliage. (F4, 800/8 ED-IF)

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Towards winter again. Late autumn all foliage gone (D3, 800/8 ED)

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Bjørn, thanks for the explanation. All these landscapes seems to be seasonal souvenirs from the mother nature for you people living in severe environment with endurance.


"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

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Guest Lowell

Bjorn, Stunning nature and beautiful photographs. I really like the flattening of the perspective putting the the different shades into a plane. I like the other photographs also. The trees around here which give those kinds of patterns are Aspens which aren't even closely related to Birches but are tall slender and black/white. Really nice.

Lowell

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Guest davepaterson

I'm very familiar with both the intense reds of the branches and the lush greens of the young leaves in our own birches in Scotland. But those woodlands of yours are really something; and so are the images.

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