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Guest olivier

the wave

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Guest olivier

Winter made an unexpected and welcome (for my kids at least!) comeback in the northern part of France.

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Guest nfoto

That's how it looks over here half the year :)

IR depicts snow in light grey hues. You cannot get the "pop" of snow scenes as in ordinary, visible-light photographs. Thus, making them b/w is a real challenge.

Classic composition, but somewhat detached to my eyes. Moving in closer and there are endless alternate worlds to explore.

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Guest olivier

Hello

By moving in closer I would lose the wave formed by the tree, wouldn't I? This was the purpose of the photo.

Because of your repeated (an justified) comments on moving in closer, this has become a constant thought when I am shooting outside... Thank you!

I agree with the comment on IR greyness of snow, but here I didn't find the fake color version appealing, so I went back to b&w.

Here is a color version of another shot. Almost everything was snow-white in visible light.

post-207-0-40773300-1363261694_thumb.jpg

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The latter one appeals me more, because your tase in color (which I always like) shines through it.

Compared to this, the first image looks a bit boring, sorry to say. The conifer foliage is rendered in white in IR and has lost the contrast against the snow, which makes the overall image a bit dull, I would think. Shooting in visible light might have been more successful, maybe?


"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

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Guest

Second one is good,

I fail to see the tree as a wave in the first one,,, an lower angle maybe?

Here in Copenhagen we also have snow again :)

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Guest olivier

Akira: thank you for your valuable critique, as always. We'll never know how it looked in visible light, most of the snow is already gone now... It is funny to see that my deficient color vision can lead to pleasing color rendering for people blessed with fully functionnal eyes! See below for a fake color version of the first image. Maybe this will make the wave more evident to Erik as well (thank you btw, and enjoy the snow!)

post-207-0-13795900-1363293088_thumb.jpg

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Guest olivier

and here is another view, taken this afternoon in the forest near my house. I am still playing with the different rendering of in and out of focus areas. I find this quite interesting and need to explore more...

post-207-0-37101200-1363293259_thumb.jpg

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Guest nfoto

Not bad -I can even identify the grass species !

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Guest olivier

despite me torturing the image? This is quite an achievement!

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Guest RC51

Hello Olivier,

I wanted to think of some positive comments for #1 and #2..... I don't see the wave?

But you have saved me the trouble by posting #3, it is superb. I like the way the in focus foreground is normal in appearance, while the out of focus background has a solarised look.

As you say it is an interesting effect, I look forward to more experiments.

Cheers

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Guest olivier

Hello Bez, thank you for trying! Obviously, the first one failed...

Just to explain, here is how I see the wave:

post-207-0-58327600-1363296011_thumb.jpg

About the second and third ones:

I still have to think about the in/out of focus thing, with my brutal treatment. With these shots I am more interested in the out of focus area, the foreground is necessary but should not overwhelm the image. The difficulty is actually to find the right background: it must have simple and recognizable lines, and yield interesting colors and contrasts in IR. This is hard to predict for me, so the result is always a surprise.

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Guest RC51

About the second and third ones:

I still have to think about the in/out of focus thing, with my brutal treatment. With these shots I am more interested in the out of focus area, the foreground is necessary but should not overwhelm the image. The difficulty is actually to find the right background: it must have simple and recognizable lines, and yield interesting colors and contrasts in IR. This is hard to predict for me, so the result is always a surprise.

I understand your vision, and feel you have found a successful formula. As for the "surprise" Bjørn our IR guru, often states he is also unable to predict the outcome.

Cheers

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Guest nfoto

The classic Japanese breaking wave. But no Mount Fuji in the background ...

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Although I usually have limited interest in the invisible-to-me spectra, I think these are marvelous.


Lew

My latest photo oriented blog posts include "Getting to a Final Image - some words for a new photographer."

Pictures and the occasional blog posting about photography and travel at http://lewlortonphoto.com

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Guest olivier

Next time I will build a Mt Fuji with snow, just as the gravel-Fuji at the Silver Temple in Kyoto... (photo taken two years ago)

post-207-0-96171400-1363356152_thumb.jpg

Lew: I am glad they appeal to you.

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Guest Deena

I really like the fourth one. It reminds me of a lithograph print and the processing works for me. You say you were playing with focus points. Would you share a little bit more about what you were doing and how you were processing this? Thanks.

Edited by Deena

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