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bjornthun

Capture One with X-trans support

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Thanks for the heads-up Bjørn,

I've downloaded it and my first trials are very promising so far.

Ok so onto something new to learn. I've organised all my photos in a Lightroom Catalog.

Phase One Capture One produces its own catalog. That's not really what I wanted.

Let's see whether Phase One can unlock the XTRANS potential.

Regards, Daniel

Edited by aerobat

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Phase One Capture One produces its own catalog. That's not really what I wanted.

In contrast to the LR straitjacket, C1 does not require you to use the catalog, you can work with the file browser (it has other warts though....)

cheers

afx


"Patriotism is the virtue of the vicious" - Oscar Wilde

"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin

Arca plates compatibility matrix // sRGB clipping sucks and Adobe RGB is just as bad // Images on images.afximages.com

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I don't want to sound like a wet blanket, but the sample images on dpreview.com suggests that the (in)famous artifact can be seen in the 100% crop of the detailed part of the image, although the images are very sharp in general.


"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." - Confucius

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akiraphoto/

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Guest schwett

for those who are subscribers to Lloyd Chambers' site (a mistake I'll never make again!) there is a good comparison showing ACR and Capture 1 results in detail. they're both terrible.

unfortunately this is just what many of us have been expecting. the x-trans is a fabulous sensor greatly handicapped *for some uses* by it's quirky filter array. truly a solution to a nonexistent problem.

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Guest Lars Hansen

I've downloaded it and my first trials are very promising so far.

Let's see whether Phase One can unlock the XTRANS potential.

Regards, Daniel

Daniel - any progress.. does it still look promising?

I've also downloaded the most recent C1 but unfortunately have no Fuji RAW files to work with.. :)

The examples I've seen so far on the internet is with mixed results and the published "full size samples" are often only half size. I'm a little disappointed but mostly interested in how the flaws will impact the overall IQ when printing A3 size.

Lars

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