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Trying out a 10x ND filter

This was badly underexposed, processed with LR4.2

24mm f/5.6 3 min exposure

DSC7951-XL.jpg


Regards,

Armando

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it is very "surreal" looking

the 2 lighted crosses on the top of the stone church really stand out

not sure about the purple color though


Regards

Doug

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

D700, D300; D200; F2, Lumix FZ30; and a bunch of Nikon MF & AF glass (& a Rokinon 85mm f1.4)

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I like the purple. Gives an eerie atmosphere.

I'd like to see more of the church.

Congrats.


Aguinaldo

www.aguinaldodepaula.com

Nikon / Zeiss

"You are not a loser when you're defeated.
You are a loser when you quit".
(Dr. House)

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I think I'm with doug about to much purple... whenever I do a quick edit at night I end up with extreme results, because I 'm tired and I'm working in the dark

as I mentioned the image is underexposed, this is sooc

DSC7951-sooc.jpg

and here is another PP attempt

DSC7951-3-XL.jpg


Regards,

Armando

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Hi Armando,

Do you mean a 10 stop filter by 10X ND?

I did try a B+W (MRC F-Pro) 10 stop filter this summer... It's definitely not neutral: It adds an heavy warm cast to the image and it's rather 11.3 stops.

- Did you take a comparison shot without filter?

- Did you notice any color cast?

- Is it actually more than 10 stops, like mine?

- What brand is yours?

Thanks!

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Guest Lars Hansen

I prefer the last one - and really like the scene btw. :-)

It would probably also have b/w potential.

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I, for one, like the first posted version better. Certainly not because it is closer to the truth (whatever that is), but because it is not so close to the truth. Like said, the eerie, surreal feeling.


HansC, doin' life

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Hi Armando,

Do you mean a 10 stop filter by 10X ND?

I did try a B+W (MRC F-Pro) 10 stop filter this summer... It's definitely not neutral: It adds an heavy warm cast to the image and it's rather 11.3 stops.

- Did you take a comparison shot without filter?

- Did you notice any color cast?

- Is it actually more than 10 stops, like mine?

- What brand is yours?

Thanks!

Marco,

I also got the B+W 10 stop Nd filter

I have yet to get a properly exposed shot , the times I have tried are close or after sunset, and by the time I repeat this 2 or 3 times the light is gone

It definitively is more than 10 stops, thanks for the info about it being 11.4 stops, every time I tried it I have gotten under exposed images

I can not tell yet about the color cast , until I get a better exposed shot, but I wouldn't be surprised if it has some

I'm going to try again this weekend


Regards,

Armando

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Marco,

I also got the B+W 10 stop Nd filter

So you do have a ND3 or ND 1000X... ;)

I have yet to get a properly exposed shot , the times I have tried are close or after sunset, and by the time I repeat this 2 or 3 times the light is gone

It definitively is more than 10 stops, thanks for the info about it being 11.4 stops, every time I tried it I have gotten under exposed images

I can not tell yet about the color cast , until I get a better exposed shot, but I wouldn't be surprised if it has some

I'm going to try again this weekend

By the way, I did find very hard shooting on or just after the Sunset.

If the Sun is above the horizon you can take an image without the filter and then just add 11 and 1/3 stops for the image with the filter. But after the Sunset the light falls off quickly and there's no rule I know of to compensate for it. Maybe in this case a 10 stop filter is just too much. If you go beyond 10 or 15 minutes after the Sunset I'd suggest using a 6 stop filter and/or open the lens diaphragm as much as you can, before to raise the ISO.

In any case turn On both ISO and Long Exposure Noise Reduction: It'll help and you won't waist time cleaning the image in PS. Believe me!

Following my results:

1. Without Filter. 1/30s f16 100ISO, Straight from the NEF file exported with Lr4.

post-5937-0-66555700-1349910520_thumb.jp

2. With Filter and Long Exposure Noise Reduction: the color cast is evident! 81s f16 100ISO, Straight from the NEF file exported with Lr4. Exactly an 11.3 stops difference.

post-5937-0-90194400-1349910538_thumb.jp

3. With Filter and Long Exposure Noise Reduction, the same image of #2 but Post Processed in and exported with Lr4.

post-5937-0-43096600-1349910553_thumb.jp

4. This is a 100% crop of the NEF file inside Lr4 with no Post Processing. 122s f16 100ISO but any kind of Noise Reduction... They are not stars in the sky and you can imagine how some Post Processing will badly enhance that noise. (there was no filter on here, it's just to show you the noise on long exposure)

post-5937-0-96876700-1349910909_thumb.jp

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thank you Marco for the explanations

I'll be shooting the ocean this weekend :)


Regards,

Armando

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Guest Patrick Pedersen

The B+W nd110 (nd1000) MRC has quite a color cast and as all of the "heavy duty" nd filters it is NEVER exactly 10 stops(!). That's mainly just because the manufacturers aren't able to produce exactly 10 stops.The Big Stopper for instance will be from 8-8.5 stops to ten, but never over, (at least not much). The B+W nd110 filter is the very same according to how many stops we'll get, but has an tendency to give a more magenta warm colour cast to the shots than f.i. the Big Stopper from Lee, which has more of an blueish cast to it, that being said I think the Big Stopper gives more detail and sharpness than the B+W nd110 does. Although I must say I prefer using the B+W with graduated nd filters from Lee in winters time here in Norway, because the Big Stopper tends to be quite difficult to find the correct white balance in the pictures when it's cold and the environment is from the nature's side quite blue from ice, frost and the blueish light we tend to have here up in the north. That again is because of the "natural" blue/cold colour cast the Big Stopper gives.

The "wisest" thing to do about the White Balance when using such a "heavy duty" ND filters is to set the WB after you've put on the filter, at each time.

LENR (long exposure noise reduction) should ALWAYS be turned "ON", at least with shutter speed longer than 30 sec.! The kind of noise we're getting on such long exposures we can't get rid of in any noise reduction program. So eventually if you think you're saving time with having the LENR "off", your about to waste much more precious time in the post processing and you'll never do it as good as the "in camera NR"..

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