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Jan Anne

24/1.4 tested at Photozone.de

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I'm in that camp also. I'm not bothered by LoCa and softer corners if I get something in return. The look of that lens wide open is one I'm willing to trade some things for.

For what this is worth in the discussion, despite my returning my copy of the 24mm f/1.4G, I am still considering this lens.  The bokeh of this lens is incredibly good. 

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I've once read that vignetting of wide-angle straight (as opposed to fisheye) lenses is physically unavoidable.

Can someone tell me how much vignetting in the corners of a 24mm lens on on FX-sensor is inevitable?

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I've once read that vignetting of wide-angle straight (as opposed to fisheye) lenses is physically unavoidable.

And very much desirable imo ;D

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I've once read that vignetting of wide-angle straight (as opposed to fisheye) lenses is physically unavoidable.

Can someone tell me how much vignetting in the corners of a 24mm lens on on FX-sensor is inevitable?

I don't doubt it's possible to design the lens to have no vignetting but the question is what the compromises associated with such a design are, and whether they're acceptable. Personally I do not find the 24/1.4's vignetting distracting. It's just a part of the character of this lens ...

There are of course lenses where the vignetting gets out of hand and there may be color shift to the corners which is highly annoying and difficult to correct, but the 24/1.4 doesn't suffer from such issues.

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I also at first compared with the PZ 14-24 MTF charts, but also with the 24-70mm lens  -  from that point of view all three lens seems to be much in the same class.

But testing with charts is at 24mm not really real life  -  I shortly bought Imatest, because I want to better understand why some of my lens work well with the D700; others not. Standing with a 24mm lens in front of a 1,5 meter wide chart makes you very aware, that that is not a typical real life situations  -  I am rarely so near to an object making pictures at 24mm.

Further I made the experience while using AF during testing my 50mm 1.4 G lens, that the MTF results varied quite a lot from picture to picture  -  for reasons I do not yet fully understand.  So at F/ 1.4 lab reports are maybe not representative for situations in the field when using AF.

C:\Dokumente und Einstellungen\Alastair Gurtner\Desktop\DSC_1615_YBR89_3D.jpg

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Lens reviews do not rely on AF, because it is unreliable!

Therefore it is no surprise that you have a varying degree of critical sharpness at the point where you need it most when you use AF.

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Tom,

I am well aware of that (and test of course also with manual focussing); just only testing in an artificial way not relevant for what happens in the field is too little to please me  -  especially because I use AF a lot.

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Right! I'm totally torn when I'm reviewing a lens. And there was once a time when I swore to do only AF-based analysis. But then the non-repeatability of these tests lead to questionable results.

Today I do my reviews based on optimal manual focus controlled by CameraControlPro and give an overall impression of the reliability and repeatability of AF.

So you can make up your own mind.

That's similar to what the German magazine Color Foto does: They use a sledge to make a series of shots from slightly varying distances with constant focus and select the best of the batch. And then they give the degradation of contrast from AF by evaluating the best and the worst of 10 shots!

Can you imagine the effort that goes into professionally testing a lens?

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I've read a lot and am happy to have only half of it forgotten.

The source of my conjecture belongs unfortunately to that half.

But I'm pretty certain that Bj

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And here is the German Wiki-entry that has a nice graph showing the natural vignetting for different focal lengths e.g. for 25mm:

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vignettierung#Nat.C3.BCrlicher_Randlichtabfall

Cos4CurvesV2.jpg

You can see a fall-off to about 35%, that is approx -1.5 EV. (Please observe that the 0.5-point is drawn one tick too low in this image!)

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Well, well, graphs and precision ::)

If you want it well done, you better do it yourself...

As the 24/1,4 has an angle of view of 84

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This lens is designed to be a low light lens....... (Hense 1.4)...Stopped down it is also fantastic.... But it is a real jewel shot wide open..... The little softness in the corners at 1.4... (which adds to it's charm at 1.4) is gone by 2.0

The lens is a stellar performer as far as I am concerned.

A couple shots that I am going to show you are not cropped... and shot at 1.4... Vignetting is not a major problem with this lens.

The real test of a lens is how it performs for they way you intend to use it... for a low light lens that you are going to mostly shoot people and artistic images it is fantastic!!!! much better in the corners than my 85 1.4 D

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Here is another shot at 1.4.... I am not bragging about the shot... but show me the vignetting??

5012781885_49f6158fef_o.jpg

THIS IS WHAT THIS LENS WAS BUILT FOR!!!!! @ 2.0..... Do this with a 2.8 lens  ;D ;D ;D

4969253978_5429ac2f23_o.jpg

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I've seen it before Joe but I still like your beer bottle shot, a lot ;D

Thanks Jan Anne... That was taken while I was trying to figure out how to explain the money I spent for the lens to my wife  ;D ;D ;D >:D >:D >:D :angel: :angel: :angel:

A quick funny story that goes along with that shot.... An Irish fellow setting next to me noticed that I was photographing my beer... and confessed to me that he has been accused of "loving his beer"!!

He said now he can tell people when they say that...... "NO..... I have met the guy that "loves his beer" 

Hey... and it is tough to make a Bud Light look good  ;D ;D

Cheers, Joe

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from those figures it bests the 14-24. amazing. Yet clearly the 14-24 is weakest at 24.

    Well, is not so clearly for me... At 24, f4.0 minimal distance - most critical for 14-24 - no sharpening, direct jpg from D3. Crop. Dimitri.

post-1603-129983570142_thumb.jpg

post-1603-129983570148_thumb.jpg

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    Well, is not so clearly for me... At 24, f4.0 minimal distance - most critical for 14-24 - no sharpening, direct jpg from D3. Crop. Dimitri.

Impressive..... Now show me what it looks like at 1.4   ;D ;D ;D

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Impressive..... Now show me what it looks like at 1.4   ;D ;D ;D

Or on a 24 PC-E  >:D >:D >:D

Moment of general appreciation: do you know what jaw-dropping reactions there would have been to the images from all of today's new 24mm options (the 14-24, the 24 PC-E and the 24/1.4), 10 years ago?

How 'bout that film industry mod of the 14-24?  They've never had tools like this to work with...

Fun shots, Joe: look forward to your work unleashed with this tool over the coming months and years.

Dimitri: I'm sure the Secret Service appreciates that resolution...  ;)

Cheers, all -

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AF-S 24/1.4 serial numbers show sales of 3461 worldwide and 1633 in USA as of July 2010 (I don't have any more recent data). That is 5094 units in just 7 months production since January 2010. By contrast the AF 28/1.4 had sales of approx 7333 (maybe up to 7500) over 12 years from September 1993 to the end of 2005. If these sales figures are anything to go by, the AF-S 24/1.4 is already a winner. Of course, initial sales of the 24/1.4 may be high due to pent-up demand since the 28/1.4 was discontinued, sales may slow down over following years but it seems likely the new lens will outsell its older sibling by a wide margin.

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For 3 years there were sold more than 96.000  Nikkors 14-24 lenses, worldwide. So what does it mean? It means they are not a substitute to each other, the 14-24 and 24/1.4, NO WAY! I, personally, do not need the 24/1.4. Somebody can't live without its shallow DOF wide open - FINE! Just do not compare apples and oranges, guys. They are absolutely different instruments for different goals. Good luck! Dimitri.

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