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  1. Yesterday
  2. I like fumbling with electronic circuits and accessories related to the musical instruments. The examples are: 1. an original overdrive pedal 2. a passive DI box using a Jensen transformer 3. a restored Boss OC-2 pedal (the original input and the output jacks had corroded contacts). 4 and 5. modification of EBow. Quite nerdy, I guess.
  3. Fantastic outcome, Alan (and great images of the end result too).
  4. Well, it's photography related, but from the hesitant start into adapting Cold War-era Russian and DDR lenses rather unimpressively to my Sigma sd Quattro-H, that has burgeoned into me virtually switching full-time back to film and related cameras, which has in turn necessitated learning how to fix the things, many of which haven't been used for a couple of decades or more. That in turn led to my reinstating my old Görlitzer Kamera Werke stand camera, which led to an old Thornton Pickard half-plate field camera joining the growing queue. Easter saw it turned from a dowdy, dirty, tarnished and sloppy thing which probably would have ended up at the tip, to a camera that I'll enjoy using for many years to come. While I couldn't fix the behind-lens shutter as the curtain was disintegrated, I did spruce up the external workings and refit them and the shutter housing to the camera as well as having refinished all the brasswork on the camera itself, and the lens is now focused at infinity when the camera is unfolded as it was designed to do originally. My next project is already lined up - I managed to find an unused, brand-new Pentacon Six assembled chassis, presumably left over from the bunch of such items that Exakta bought when Pentacon closed around 1990, and which they turned into the uber-expensive Exakta66. As I also have a dysfunctional but cosmetically excellent Pentacon Six body here, assembling a brand new, working Pentacon 66 from the two is the objective. This could end badly, but hopefully I've learned enough to succeed and thus become the owner of probably the last brand new, functional Pentacon Six ever. As a hobby, this camera restoration/resuscitation thing is proving to be addictive. That I managed to assemble the Thornton Pickard shutter externals into as good as operational state from just a plastic bag full disassembled bits and no instructions (if I had a new blind to fit it would work) gave me the sort of buzz that has us eager to pursue a hobby aside from regular work, I think.
  5. Dallas

    More Cosplay

    All I can say is #metoo.
  6. Something else I would really love to do is get into car restoration, but... alas ... I could only project manage such things as I am thoroughly useless with most mechanical things. I'd have to become like Mike Brewer from Wheeler Dealers... I think I must have watched about a hundred YouTube videos on car restorations over Easter weekend. I'm also suddenly finding myself being inexplicably drawn to the Porsche 928, particularly the S4 models. They can still be found at somewhat earthly prices, but the thing is, you never know what you're getting into and the costs to repair Porsche's might just be a little less earthly...
  7. GB111

    More Cosplay

    This photo garnered a lot of attention on Facebook, I guess it's not hard to see why! This gal makes and models her own outfits. Very talented and motivated. Shot at a comic convention in Anaheim California called WonderCon.
  8. GB111

    Anza-Borrego Wildflowers

    Just before they all disappeared.
  9. I like long distance running, but I've been dealing with a foot injury which has prevented me from doing much this year. I also like many forms of art. I just started taking a silkscreen printing class, which has been on my list for 20 years (really..). It is awesome, hope to turn a number of my pictures into silk screen prints.
  10. Last week
  11. Besides photography (which I have not been doing with any sort of enthusiasm for almost a year now) my other interests include playing my guitars (which I took up again a couple of years ago after an hiatus of about 40 years), gardening, playing Ice Hockey, and of course the ever popular do-it-yourself. Being one of the rarest of the rare, a Jew who knows how to use tools, I love to repair and refurbish all manner of things including patching and sewing my Goalie equipment as it needs it. Lately, through a fellow hockey buddy who is also an excellent guitar player I've begun to do some simple Luthiering and have been repairing old acoustic guitars so they can be donated to a music school for disadvantaged kids here in Toronto. And I'm in the midst of negotiations to begin scanning a huge collection of analogue photo material for a friend, which will keep me employed two or three days per week. So along with a number of our Grandchildren's activities that my wife and I are responsible for, despite being retired, I'm a pretty busy guy. Robert
  12. Don't worry, you're not alone. I like the idea of DIY, but can't always get those ideas to fruition. The hobbies I do sometimes get somewhere with are a bit more active - hiking is one, which also fits in nicely with photography. This has also lead to something from work making the jump to a hobby! I sometimes make my own maps which solves the problem of always finding that where you want to go is on the join of two or more map sheets.
  13. I'm looking for a different hobby (since my old one became my full time job). I've got to say that I am really interested in carpentry, but at the same time I am not very good at DIY. Just the other day I up-cycled an old coffee table by sanding it down (it was full of cup rings and other signs of abuse) and then painting the base and legs white, while varnishing the top to a high gloss finish. The end result is quite pleasing, but in the process I managed to stick a screwdriver into the fleshy bit between my thumb and forefinger while attempting to open a small, plastic paint container (while following Plascon's idiotic instructions, I might add!). The thought of using things like table saws and other power tools for creating furniture excites me, but simultaneously fills me with thoughts of dread, since my blood literally went onto the table project after the paint episode. I love to create things so am interested in what my fellow forumites here do to amuse themselves when not out taking photos?
  14. vivionm

    More New York random pics

    Too late for tablets, I fear ...
  15. Mike G

    More New York random pics

    Of course you did! Keep taking the tablets. 😀
  16. Dallas

    More New York random pics

    Oh, you ain't seen nothing yet, Mike. I was reading a printed book the other day and I found myself pressing down on a word waiting for the pop-up context menu to appear so I could lookup the meaning... 🙄
  17. Mike G

    More New York random pics

    That’s called old age Dallas. 😋
  18. Dallas

    More New York random pics

    Mirrorless cameras do take a bit of time to adapt to, but like everything, once you become accustomed to them they get easier. The weirdest thing for me when I got that Canon 200D last year, was looking through an OVF again. So strange! I have my EVF set up to immediately show me what I just shot, so I'd be looking through the OVF for a couple of seconds after taking the shot and wondering what the heck was wrong with the camera!
  19. atpaula

    More New York random pics

    Thank you Dallas. The camera is very nice to handle, lightweight and with a good grip . As I walk all day during my photo sessions it is a joy. Image quality is similar to my D5, but I suspect not in low light photography. I have to confirm that. Three things I don´t like so far: 1- Batteries: I have to manage it more carefully and always carry a spare in my pocket. With My D5 and D4s I don´t have to worry about it. One battery fully charged in those cameras lasts almost one week for me, shooting everyday. 2- I like to use manual focus lenses and I miss the white/green dot focus confirmation when using these lenses. The peaking highlights sucks for my kind of photography (street and landscape). Maybe it is the best for macro work, but I don´t do that. That´s the main disadvantage of this camera for me. 3- The EVF has to be turned on every time you need it. You can set it to automatically do so when you place the camera in your eyes, but there is an annoying delay. You can train yourself to press the shutter release while bringing the camera to your eyes or leave the EVF always on, which will drain more power. I'm still waiting to purchase my first Z lens to see how the combo works. I'm planning to buy the 14-30mm f/4 zoom and the Noct. Nikon said they will be released in spring, but I'm not sure in what year!
  20. Dallas

    More New York random pics

    What are your thoughts on the Z6, Aguinaldo? (photos are excellent, as usual)
  21. atpaula

    More New York random pics

    From a recent trip. Nikon D5 and Z6. Thank you for looking. 1 2 3 4 5 6
  22. vivionm

    The GAS Conundrum

    Excellent thoughts, Walter.
  23. scenario

    Carmella

    Shot this morning
  24. Akira

    32mm f/1.8 Zeiss Touit

    I've been looking for an all-round standard lens for my X-E3. Fuji's genuine XF 35/1.4 was too noisy for me, and I don't like the inner barrel moving back and forth when focusing along with the attached hood. XF 35/2.0 suffered from sample vatiation, and my third sample, although its optics was very well centered, didn't yield acceptable sharpness at the far corners even stopped down to f8.0. I was hesitating to go for the Touit, because both Optical Limits (formerly called Fotozone) and LensTip reported their test samples was not properly assembled. Nevertheless, I decided to try one for myself, being a bit disappointed by the genuine lenses. Quite fortunately, my first sample appears to be just fine. The sharpness of the central area is fine even wide open, except when the lens is focused at the closest distant ranges. And, even focused to the closest limit, the subject is finely rendered. The sharpness of the entire frame is very good already at f4.0. What I really like is the rounded rendition of the focused area and the smooth bokeh of the area immediately in front of and behind the focused area. Apparently, the longitudinal chromatic aberration is not really apparent. The overall color-related aberration seems to be kept at bay. The focusing speed is not very fast according to today's standard for the prime lenses of this class for the mirrorless system in general. But it is on par with Nikon D750 and AF-S 50/1.8G combo that I fondly used previously and the focus accuracy is noticeably superior to that of Nikon combo. Unfortunately, the profile of Touit lenses are not yet implemented in Capture One. But the chromatic aberration can be acceptably corrected by the "analyze" function of the software, and the distortion is not very obvious in general and can be pretty well corrected by the "distortion" slider offered by the software. I also like the slightly wider angle of view of 48 degree. I've always felt that the angle of view of a 35mm lens on an APS-C sensor was a bit narrow.
  25. Akira

    Spring flowers

    Thank you, Walter. The azaleas are very common here in Japan, but here the placement of the flowers interested me.
  26. Walter Rowe

    The GAS Conundrum

    I have had spells where I felt creatively dead and believed new equipment was the solution. It can be in terms of getting me excited, but if I only take the same kind of pictures I took with the “old” equipment I quickly realize the new equipment is not resolving my issue. Go some place that is familiar to you. Sit there for a while without taking any pictures. Let your mind be at ease vs rushing into snapping frames. At some point you get a clarity and vision for something you see around you. Then you can start snapping frames. For me these “dead” times often are the result of compressing too much into too little time and not giving my mind time to “decompress”. Pausing for a while and letting my vision return ends up getting my creative juices flowing again better than new equipment. After all, it all comes down to ISO, aperture, shutter speed AND composition. No matter what camera you use, those are the basics behind every frame. What differentiates one person’s image from another’s is the creator’s vision and how they execute it through composition and controlling the ISO, shutter and aperture to convey that vision in this visual medium called photography.
  27. Walter Rowe

    Spring flowers

    I especially like #2, the azaleas.
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