Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

X-T1 & X-Pro1 will do me for work...


Alan7140

On Sunday the Forests issue got traction yet again in protest to the current Federal government's attempt to have half of the recently declared (by UNESCO, at the previous Government's request) as extensions to the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, with an on-location protest rally in the forest. Considering it was a cold day, and that there is only one road into the area and no facilities at all out there, some 2,000 people turning up from all over the State was indeed telling as to the public mood concerning the situation. The main road was parked on both sides for over 4km, which meant some had a decent return walk to accomplish, with the rally itself being held on a contentious forestry logging road.

I had been contracted specifically to photograph 13 people standing in a line holding large cut-out letters in the form of a slogan whilst standing in the old growth forest. Now this may sound easy, but the room to do that simply doesn't exist in that forest, however a combination of the X-T1 & 14mm lens on a Nodal Ninja pano head, with the people standing in a part circle each 3 metres from the camera solved the problem just fine, 9 shots left to right. When stitched they appear to be in a roughly straight line :) . (Yes, I anticipated that & did it deliberately this way). Click on for 1920px HD size.

0EXRiuH.jpg

I also covered the shot with the X-Pro1 and Samyang 8mm fisheye with the camera on a 60° tilt, and while this allowed more foreground & height it was nowhere near the IQ of the Fuji 14mm on the X-T1 above:

WXmjfM5.jpg

I love the kid in the left background who got bored and went to look at the fungi :lol:

The forest was dark as it was raining lightly, so I shot the thing @ 1/15 sec, f/7.1, ISO 1600 for each frame to avoid as much subject movement as possible without losing DOF, and despite taking 5 separate sequences on two separate setups I only had one fidgety bloke who managed to move his head each time, but slightly enough that it made no difference.

I then switched to "coverage mode", shooting a series of speakers at the mic under a green marquis at 3200 ISO with the 55-200 lens and OIS engaged and only had to cull two shots out of the lot for movement. The IQ was better than acceptable, and I would have struggled for that keeper rate with the D3s (and for which I certainly didn't have a lens that could have gotten in so close with).

dIdRmiI.jpg

Celebrity TV actress Lisa Gormley getting a bit emotional (Home & Away TV soap drama)

LpdMfle.jpg

Activist & Tasmanian forest tree-sitter (457 continuous days) Miranda Gibson

Lastly I attached the X-Pro1 & fisheye to my fully extended RRS monopod and held it up at full arm's stretch after triggering the self timer @ 2secs delay for an "overhead" of everyone turned to wave at the "official" aerial photographer who had climbed onto a platform 20 metres up the tree to take his shot... :) (I say "official" inasmuch as several photographers had each been allocated their particular tasks - this was primarily an event for publicising via the media).

iaWBRXF.jpg

So yes, I don't regret for one second switching to the Fuji - I was still fresh at the end of the day, no backache or shoulder pain, and my load including the tripod was around 6kg instead of over double that, all contained in four pouches on my Lowepro Technical vest and in my RRS Tripod bag.


  Report New article
Sign in to follow this  


Comments

Recommended Comments

OTOH they seem to be working 24/7 to get everyone off-side now, so more and more events such as this on all manner of the things they're trying to foist on us will start happening. Whatever, I can't seem to find anyone now who admits to voting for them, or anyone who likes either the PM or his treasurer. Amazing performance, to go from lauded poll heroes to loathed villains in well under a year, and it's all their own doing.

 

Of all those things, picking on the pensioners will ultimately be their undoing - nobody has ever got away with that one.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I've added it to the articles database and simultaneously shared it on Facebook so hopefully it will get you even more exposure. :) 

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alan, these images are phenomenal.  I'm particularly impressed with the stitched panoramic shot.  I can't image getting better results with larger equipment.  I think you did really well.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

That'll get me into trouble!! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: - the slogan picture (I was told too late), was to be kept under wraps until some future something-or-other whatever.

 

Still, they wouldn't have got that slogan shot in that form without me, so bad luck, I guess...

 

Unfortunately that photo didn't take too kindly to being mashed down to 1920px - the original pano is 16,239 x 4397 px....71.4MP @ 461.5MB, so to call this 1.5MB rendition a "lossy"!

I got things a bit mixed up - I've had to edit the images here, will that be a problem?

Edited by Alan7140

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

It shouldn't, provided they aren't hosted here (which I see they aren't). As I understand it the forum post and article body are linked so changes on either should automatically reflect on both sides. 

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

As panos become increasingly available to the masses as an inbuilt setting on most cameras these days, and just as it was getting impossibly hard to convince people that it was worth hiring a professional to take photographs of their events rather than rely on Uncle Harry and his iPhone when digital first hit with a vengeance, people fail to understand that someone who knows what they're doing will turn out panoramas that are highly detailed and entirely free of double-imaging as a matter of course using equipment that looks nothing like their point-and-shoot set on panorama function.

 

In the P&S case getting the result looking like this would be a happy "Well, will you look at that - they look like they're in a straight line" comment rather than actually having placed the people in that position because the end result will look like they're in a straight line.

 

As one of the letter holders remarked as I was shooting these, "you don't realise what goes into something like this when you only see the end result, do you?".

 

If she only knew the half of it - I've been shooting panos using at least partial digital output since the late 1990's, joining images scanned from negatives shot on a Hasselblad and scanned with a Nikon Coolscan 8000 ED scanner. Compared with the rapidity with which I can complete a simple one-row pano like these today, back then I was limited to B&W because neither the scanning of colour negs nor the colour shifts between shots would allow seamless stitches, and manual stretching and shaping of layers as well as much retouching was always necessary during assembly in Photoshop, even for B&W. A single pano could take days to produce, particularly given the state of computing power available then.

 

These panos took maybe 10-15 seconds each to shoot after setup, and PTGUI stitched them in roughly 10 seconds each on my current machine in comparison.

 

I think the end result could also include a banner, and this has the resolution and format that would be ideal for that use.

 

In using the Fuji I really lose nothing compared with the D3s, except that when using the same focal length lens I have to take more shots to cover the same area, however in doing that, resolution-wise I am streets ahead with the Fuji - about 30MP for the same shot area of a D3s 12MP frame. I regularly shot forest scenes at 3200 ISO with the D3s, and as the shots above of the speakers show, the Fuji is easily the equal of the D3s at 3200 ISO.

Edited by Alan7140

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't you just love it when people say "great photo, you must have a good camera"?

 

Your pano is a fine example of creativity and craftsmanship.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Anthony,  Dallas, astaab & crowecg.

 

I guess this is also the final time that I will have to make comparisons with my old FX Nikon gear and justify my choice of the Fuji system instead. There is nothing I did on Sunday that the Nikon could have done better, and some things it would have done worse (try holding well over 2kg of camera & lens attached to a fully extended RRS monopod at outstretched arm's length at about 45° steady enough to take a photo, for instance - with the lightweight Fuji it was easy).

 

I don't know quite why it panned out this way in that I seem to have spent the last 2 years+ continually defending an justifying the switch to a lightweight mirrorless system with a revolutionary new sensor design over an antiquated system that is still based firmly in the roots of a film-camera design, where it was necessary to seal the film from light completely while using a mirror and reflex finder to optically view what the lens was seeing.

There is simply no need for this today, the Fuji X-T1 EVF is without doubt the best viewfinder I have ever used in a 35mm-sized or smaller camera, and allowing as it does a light, compact, well-handling, silent and well-priced mirrorless camera that is easily the equal or better of any DSLR I used in the past means that any further justification is moot.

 

I simply have the best camera system for me and the jobs I do now, full stop, end of story. :)

Edited by Alan7140

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alan, the stiched pano is really stunning.  Also I was amazed by the fact that they were only about 3m from the camera.  Thanks for sharing!

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Akira. To further boggle the senses, the guy holding the first letter and the last guy holding the exclamation point were six paces apart and facing each other, with the camera in between them. :huh:

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm... seems that it only works in one direction. I'll do a copy and paste of what's in here onto the article side. 

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alan7140:

 

With all respect; the gear doesn`t make the pictures, you do. I don`t find the pictures in this article impressive, rather boring actually (composition etc.). 

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry, just my honest opinion - or should I've lied?

All his talk about format vs format.....

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going to stop this right here. There will be no "having a go" at any members' work on Fotozones. If members feel the need to express disapproval of other members' work they need to do so in a manner that is not antagonistic of the other members efforts. You may be critical, but do so constructively. 

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just beeing frank. I can see that I could have ben more concrete in my critique (though my conclusion stand). My apologies if bad taken!

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Frode, I couldn't care less about any opinion, one way or the other, expressed on any photos I have taken here - if you had bothered to note the section they were posted in and actually read what I wrote, you'd have seen that the photos were purely used to illustrate the point on using an X-T1 (and older X-Pro1) in a situation where I used to use Nikon D* series cameras where the shooting conditions were difficult, and was meant to point out that in under those difficult circumstances the Fuji performed in a manner that was easily on par with the Nikon gear I used to use. Reading the copy and viewing the photos at full size would have fully explained the reasons for the choice of examples to provide verification for the conclusions drawn.

 

The precise point was exactly format vs format (or perhaps better mirrorless vs DSLR) in the Gear Zone section of the forum designated exactly for such discussion.

 

If I have a photo of worthwhile merit or in need of critique in its own right, I'll post it in the Image Zone, where it belongs.

So the whole point of the posting was to compare my experience in a single actual usage situation between a DSLR cameras I used to use and the mirrorless cameras I have chosen to use now.

 

Believe it or not there are other people who have also done this or are contemplating doing this sort of systemic change, and as someone who has spent no small amount of time in both using the old and new technology professionally and now having made a full transition to a mirrorless system, I wrote this for the benefit for those people to help with their choices to do so based on my experience, or indeed to help decide if my experience with the gear was not relevant to their own use or even to help a decision to stay with what they are using now if that is the case.

 

That you think the photos I took and chose to illustrate my points are crap is irrelevant, in this case the client was happy that they filled the brief as specified and that they were shot for, and that is all that matters to me.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a follow-up on the main "Support UNESCO" photo - it finally made its appearance today in the public domain in a press release & FB posting after a recommendation by the advisory committee that the Australian Government's attempt to delist 74,000 HA of the recently declared World Heritage Area be rejected, and for a small campaign at the far corner of the Earth during Europe & America's night-time the response of over 1,000 likes and 256 shares on Facebook in under an hour on a Saturday morning here was not a bad response. It'll be interesting to see what the 12-hour response stands at later...

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this campaign will also gain traction by last week's lying performance of the budget delivery. Even the Sydney Morning Herald's Mike Carlton came right out with it and called Prime Minister Abbott a liar. Being a proven liar won't help his cause in convincing UNESCO that he isn't lying in this case, either (which he patently is - the forests are not "degraded" - I reckon I'd have a fair idea if they were... ;)  )

 

5 hours in and there are 2,000-odd likes, 500+ shares.

 

Edit: Here's the link to the Carlton article:

http://www.smh.com.au/comment/tony-abbotts-name-is-mud-20140515-zrd9w.html

Edited by Alan7140

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great photos Alan.  I hope this is resolved in favor of the trees.  Politics, you know, is the art of saying one thing, but meaning something else that is very different.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great photos Alan.  I hope this is resolved in favor of the trees.  Politics, you know, is the art of saying one thing, but meaning something else that is very different.

 

 

Thanks, Ron.

 

Unfortunately when the "meaning something very different" is actually something completely different again, you have a closer definition of the corrupt politicians we have here at the moment. Thankfully the population is largely comprised of descendants of English and Irish transported convicts via the 19th Century English legal system, liberally topped up by a huge wave of post WW2 immigrants from the wreck of Europe and a smaller number of Asians post-Vietnam war - as a whole the result has very little time for pompous tory elitists and is really adverse to tolerating the sh*t that springs from them.

 

Things are starting to get interesting here at the moment, this UNESCO thing being the first of numerous comebacks and the stand downs they'll cause in the govt ranks... :)

Edited by Alan7140

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By visiting this website you are agreeing to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy & Guidelines.